Ap u. S. History syllabus matthew S. Garrett Washington County High School



Download 413.34 Kb.
Page1/7
Date conversion20.10.2016
Size413.34 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Page


Page





AP U.S. HISTORY SYLLABUS

Matthew S. Garrett

Washington County High School

Matthew.garrett@washington.kyschools.us
The NEW***2014-15 Historical Thinking Skills

 From the AP Website....

 

 

Historical Thinking Skills: Students use of historical thinking skills will be assessed throughout the exam.



I.                   Chronological Reasoning

a.       Historical Causation- students will examine relationships between causes and consequences of events or processes.  Long Essay Focus



Students should be able to…

                -Compare causes and/or effects, including between short and long term effects.

                -Analyze and evaluate the interaction of multiple causes and effects.

                -Assess historical contingency by distinguishing among coincidence, causation,

                and correlation, as well as critiquing existing interpretations of cause and effect.

b.      Patterns of Continuity and Change over time – students will identify and analyze patterns of continuity and change over time and connect them to larger historical processes and themes. Long Essay Focus



Students should be able to…

-Analyze and evaluate historical patterns of continuity and change over time

-Connect patterns of continuity and change over time to larger historical processes or themes

c.       Periodization – students will investigate and construct different models of historical periodization. Long Essay Focus



Students should be able to…

-Explain ways that historical events and processes can be organized within blocks of time.

-Analyze and evaluate competing models of periodization of U. S. history.

II.                 Comparison and Contextualization

a.       Comparison – students will compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and geographical contexts. Long Essay Focus



Students should be able to…

-Compare related historical developments and processes across place, time, and/or different societies or within one society

-Explain and evaluate multiple and differing perspectives on a given phenomenon

b.      Contextualization – students will connect historical developments to specific circumstances of time and place, and to broader regional, national, or global processes.



Students should be able to…

-Explain and evaluate ways in which specific historical phenomena, events, or processes connect to broader regional, national, or global processes occurring at the same time.

-Explain and evaluate ways in which a phenomenon, event, or process connects to other, similar historical phenomena across time and place.

III.              Crafting Historical Arguments from Historical Evidence

a.       Historical Argumentation-Students will develop coherent written arguments that have a thesis supported by relevant historical evidence.



Students should be able to…

-Analyze commonly accepted historical arguments and explain how an argument has been constructed from historical evidence.

-Construct convincing interpretations through analysis of disparate, relevant historical evidence.

-Evaluate and synthesize conflicting historical evidence to construct persuasive historical arguments.

b.      Appropriate Use of Relevant Historical Evidence- students will analyze evidence about the past from diverse sources, such as written documents, maps, images, quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables), and works of art.



Students should be able to…

-Analyze features of historical evidence such as audience, purpose, point of view, format, argument, limitations, and context germane to the evidence considered.

-Based on analysis and evaluation of historical evidence, make supportable inferences and draw appropriate conclusions.

IV.              Historical Interpretation and Synthesis

a.       Interpretation – students will identify and evaluated diverse historical interpretations.



Students should be able to…

-Analyze diverse historical interpretations.

-Evaluate how historians’ perspectives influence their interpretations and how models of historical interpretation change over time.

b.      Synthesis – students will combine disparate, sometimes contradictory evidence from primary sources and secondary works in order to create a persuasive understanding of the past, and to apply insights about the past to other historical contexts or circumstances, including the present.



Students should be able to…

-Combine disparate, sometimes contradictory evidence from primary sources and secondary works in order to create a persuasive understanding of the past.

-Apply insights about the past to other historical contexts or circumstances, including the present.

Textbook:

Brinkley, Alan. American History: A Survey w/PSI CD, 12th edition. McGraw-Hill, 2008.

Zinn Link - http://www.historyisaweapon.com/zinnapeopleshistory.html

Secondary Sources [CR1c]

Davis, Kenneth, Don’t Know Much About History: Everything You Need to Know about American History but Never Learned.New York: Harper Collins, 2003.

Loewen, James W. Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything your American history textbook got

! wrong. (New York: Touchstone, 2007).
Taking Sides: Clashing Views in United States History, Volumes I & II, Fifteenth Edition. Ed.

! Madaras, Larry and James M. SoRelle. (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2013).



Each unit of study will address the concept questions (7) as related to the time period


  1. How has the American national identity changed over time? (Identity)




  1. How have changes in markets, transportation, and technology affected American society? (Work, Exchange, and Technology)




  1. How have changes in migration and population patterns affected American life? (Peopling)




  1. How have various groups sought to change the federal government’s role in American political, social, and economic life? (Politics and Power)




  1. How has U.S. involvement in global conflicts set the stage for domestic social changes? (America in the World)


Curriculum Requirements
CR1a The course includes a college-level U.S.history textbook.
CR1b The course includes diverse primary sources consisting of written documents, maps, images, quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables), and works of art.
CR1c The course includes secondary sources written by historians or scholars interpreting the past.
CR2 Each of the course historical periods receives explicit attention.
CR3 The course provides opportunities for students to apply detailed and specific knowledge (such as names, chronology, facts, and events) to broader historical understandings.
CR4 The course provides students with opportunities for instruction in the learning objectives in each of the seven themes throughout the course, as described in the AP U.S. History Curriculum Framework.
CR5 The course provides opportunities for students to develop coherent written arguments that have a thesis supported by relevant historical evidence.— Historical argumentation
CR6 The course provides opportunities for students to identify and evaluate diverse historical interpretations.— Interpretation
CR7 The course provides opportunities for students to analyze evidence about the past from diverse sources, such as written documents, maps, images, quantitative data (charts, graphs, tables), and works of art.— Appropriate use of relevant historical evidence
CR8 The course provides opportunities for students to examine relationships between causes and consequences of events or processes.— Historical causation
Example




CR9 The course provides opportunities for students to identify and analyze patterns of continuity and change over time and connect them to larger historical processes or themes.— Patterns of change and continuity over time



CR10 The course provides opportunities for students to investigate and construct different models of historical periodization.— Periodization
CR11 The course provides opportunities for students to compare historical developments across or within societies in various chronological and geographical contexts.— Comparison
CR12 The course provides opportunities for students to connect historical developments to specific circumstances of time and place, and to broader regional, national, or global processes.— Contextualization
CR13a The course provides opportunities for students to combine disparate, sometimes contradictory evidence from primary sources and secondary works in order to create a persuasive understanding of the past.— Synthesis
CR13b The course provides opportunities for students to apply insights about the past to other historical contexts or circumstances, including the present.— Synthesis
CLASS GRADING SCALE:

The following grading scale has been established to determine the student’s nine weeks grade on all

quizzes, tests, projects, final grades, etc.

A = 100-90% B = 89-80% C = 79-70% D = 69-60% F = 59-0%



The New Exam: time/scoring%

The AP Exam is 3 hours and 15 minutes and includes a 100 minute multiple choice/ short answer section and a 95 minute free response section. Each section is divided into two parts. Student performance will be compiled and weighted to determine an AP Exam Score.

Section 1:

55 Multiple Choice Questions: 55 minutes/40%

Multiple-choice questions will focus on students’ ability to reason about different types of historical evidence. They are organized into sets of 2 to 6 questions related to a stimulus (i.e., readings and images).

The questions will draw upon knowledge required by the curriculum framework, and each question will address one of the learning objectives for the course (Concept Outline). Events and topics contained in the illustrative example boxes of the curriculum framework will NOT appear in m/c q’s (unless fully explained by text).

4 Short Answer Questions: 45 minutes/20%

Short-answer questions (timed at 10 to 15 minutes each) are a new addition to the exam. This type of question asks students to respond to historical source material and problems. The questions measure students’ ability to use specific historical thinking skills rather than to develop a thesis.

The questions will directly address one or more of the thematic learning objectives for the course. At least 2 of the 4 questions will have elements of internal choice. All of the q’s will require students to use HTS to respond to a primary source, a historian’s argument, non-textual sources such as data or maps, or general propositions about U.S. history. Each q will ask students to identify and analyze examples of historical evidence relevant to the source or question…these could be from the concept outline or from classroom instruction not specifically mentioned in the outline.

Section 2:

No document-based question or long-essay question will focus exclusively on events prior to 1607 (period 1) or after 1980 (period 9). Students will always write at least one essay – in either the DBQ or LE sections – that examines long-term developments that cross historical time periods.



1 Document Based Question: 60 minutes/25%

The DBQ will have one of the following historical thinking skills as its main focus: Causation, Change and Continuity over time, comparison, interpretation, or periodization. All DBQ’s will also always assess the historical thinking skills of Historical Argumentation, appropriate use of relevant historical evidence, contextualization, and synthesis.

The DBQ Rubric asks the student to offer plausible analysis of both the content of all or all but one of the documents AND use one of the following: intended audience, purpose, historical context, or author’s point of view…for all or all but one of the documents …to earn the full 3pts for ANALYSIS, Outside Info adds 1 for a total of a possible 4…

Maximum Points= 7   Rubric:  Thesis (1pt), Analysis of historical evidence and support of argument (3pts) AND Analysis of outside examples to support thesis/argument (1pt) Total of 4pts, Contextualization (1pt), and Synthesis (1pt)



1 Long-essay Question: 35 Minutes/15%

Students will be given a choice between two questions. Questions will be limited to topics or examples specifically mentioned in the concept outline. The essay will measure the use of historical thinking skills to explain and analyze significant issues in U.S. History as defined by the thematic learning objectives. Types of questions: Continuity and Change over time, Comparison, Causation, or Periodization

Maximum points= 6   Rubric: Thesis (1pt), Support for Argument (2pts), Application of targeted historical thinking skill( 2pts)…describes HC & COT with analysis of specific examples to illustrate both , Describes S & D with reasons , describes C & E with analysis of examples , analyzes the extent to which historical development (periodization) was diff or sim to events that preceded or followed providing specific examples to illustrate…Synthesis (1pt).


UNIT 1: Pre and Post-Columbian America (3 days) (Peopling, Identify, America in the World, Environment and Geography, Ideas, Beliefs, Culture, Politics and Power

Curriculum Framework: Period 1 (1491 – 1607)

Organizing Principles:
What were the major patterns of American Indian life in North America before Europeans arrived?

To what extent did American Indian and European ideas of freedom differ on the eve of contact?

Identify the causes which impelled European explorers to look west across the ocean? Which of these were the most important, why?

Identify the major consequences of European contact with American Indians? Which of these were the most significant, why? (CR8)

What were the chief features of the Spanish empire in America?

Compare and contrast the Spanish, French, and Dutch empires in North America?

SFI: hunter gathers, maize, Pueblo, Iroquois, mestizo, encomienda system, joint stock company

Unit 2: Columbus to the French and Indian War 1492-1763 13 days Ch. 1-4

Organizing Principles: (Politics and Power, America in the World, Environment and Geography, Ideas, Beliefs, Culture, Work, Exchange, Technology, Identify, Peopling)


  1. Between 1607 and 1763, the British North American colonies developed experience in, and the expectation of self-government and autonomy in the political, religious, economic, and social aspects of life.




  1. Between 1607 and 1763 British North American colonies developed distinct political, economic, and social characteristics based on geographical and historical explanations.


Unit SFI (Specific Factual Information)

    1. SFI: Columbus, Columbian Exchange, Spain vs. France vs. England

Columbian Exchange, Jesuits, Juan de Sepúlveda, Bartolomé de Las Casas, Wool Act, Molasses Act, widespread smuggling in Spanish and English colonies



    1. SFI: Roanoke, John Smith, Virginia Company, Royal vs. Proprietary vs. Charter Colony, Church of England, Indentured Servants, Headright System, House of Burgesses, Anglican Church

    2. SFI: Calvinist Puritans, Plymouth Plantation, Pilgrims/Separatists, William Bradford, John Winthrop, Mayflower Compact, Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, “Town Meetings”, “City on a Hill” Salem Witch Trials, misogyny, theocracy

Quakers, William Penn, James Oglethorpe, Act of Religious Toleration

    1. Atlantic Economy, Atlantic Economy, Northern vs. Southern Economy

Triangular trade, Trade/Navigation Acts, Plantation slavery, Merchant Capitalists, Mercantilism,

Casta system, mulatto, Métis

    1. Pequot War, King Phillips War, Indentured Servants, Bacon’s Rebellion

    2. Religion vs. Secularism, Education, Early Governments and Law

    3. SFI: The Great Awakening, Enlightenment, Jonathan Edwards, George Whitefield, Harvard College,

New vs. Old Lights, Phyllis Wheatley, Poor Richard’s Almanac, Peter Zenger Trial, Colonial Governments

    1. King William’s War, Queen Anne’s War, Iroquois Confederacy, Albany Plan, “Join or Die,” French and Indian War, Salutary Neglect, Peace of Paris 1763, Braddock’s Defeat, Proclamation of 1763

Assignments: Main Idea Log: Maryland



Main Idea Log: Trade/Navigation Acts

Main Idea Log: The French and Indian War

Discussions:

Winthrop, “A Model of Christian Charity”

Edwards, Jonathan “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” Analysis (1b)

John Locke, Second Treatise on Civil Government

Benjamin Franklin on George Whitefield

Carol F Karlsen, from The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England


Assessments: Students will analyze primary sources from John Locke and Adam Smith to discover the influence of both authors in mainstream American political and economic values.(WXT-1)(WXT-2)(WXT-6)(WOR-2)(CUL-4) [CR3] [CR4]
Long Essay in class: Explain the Enlightenment’s impact upon the First Great Awakening. (CR5)

  1. Essays: Assess the relationship between Indians and Europeans in Colonial America. Confine your answers between 1607-1763 (CR5)




  1. Discuss the impact of Salutary Neglect in early Colonial America. Confine your answers to 1607-1763. (CR5)

Unit 3: From Colonies to the United States of America 1763-1789 14 days Ch 4-6
Organizing Principles: (Politics and Power, America in the World, Environment and Geography, Ideas, Beliefs, Culture, Work, Exchange, Technology, Identify, Peopling)


  1. Between 1763 and 1776, British attempts to exert control over the colonies led to violent and non-violent, organized, successful resistance.




  1. The Articles of Confederation provided a reasonable and workable transition from the unitary system of British rule to the federal system established under the Constitution.


Unit 3 SFI

    1. British Salutary Neglect, Colonial Reactions, Violent/Non-Violence Pontiac’s Rebellion, George Grenville, Sugar Act of 1764, Currency Act of 1764, Mutiny Quartering) Act of 1765, Stamp Act of 1765, Stamp Act Congress, Paxton Boys, Regulator Movement, Post War Depression, Sons of Liberty, Declaratory Act 1766, Virginia Resolves, Thomas Hutchinson’s House, Colonial Boycotts

    2. Philosophy of the Revolution, Acts of Defiance , Acts of Unity

Non-Importation Agreements of 1766, Townshend Acts of 1767, Vice-Admiralty Courts, Boston Massacre of 1770, Virtual and actual representation, “no taxation without representation,” Sons of Liberty, Daughters of Liberty, American Board of Customs Commissioners, Spinning Bees, “homespun”

    1. Colonial Divisions, State Constitutions

    2. SFI: Olive Branch Petition, Common Sense , Declaration of Independence 1776, John Locke, Social Compact Theory, Loyalists/Tories

    3. Phase I—New England, Phase II—Mid-Atlantic, Phase III—South

    4. SFI: Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation, Battle of Saratoga, Treaty of Paris, Hessians

    5. Judith Sargent Murray, Republican Motherhood, Benjamin Banneker, Abigail Adams, Pennsylvania Gradual Emancipation Law, Articles of Confederation, Shay’s Rebellion, frontier vs. tidewater Virginia

    6. Corridos, Spanish Missions Architecture, Vaqueros

    7. Virginia’s Statue on Religious Toleration, Land Ordinance of 1784 and 1785, Northwest Ordinance, Annapolis Convention

    8. Virginia and New Jersey Plans, The Great Compromise (Connecticut Compromise), Three-Fifths Compromise, Federalist Papers

    9. The Federalist Papers, Federalist No. 10, The Bill of Rights, Judiciary Act of 1789, “ratifying conventions”, Federalists, Anti-Federalists

Student Activities

Main Idea Log: Townshend Duties and Customs Racketeering.

Main Idea Log: Women and Colonial Resistance

Main Idea Log: Declaration of Independence and Common Sense

Image: Paul Revere’s version of the Boston Massacre [CR1b]

Image: John Trumbull: The Battle of Bunker Hill (CR1b)

Document: John Andres to William Barrell: Letter Regarding the Boston Tea Party [CR1b]

Document: The Declaration of Independence (1B)

Document: James Madison Defends the Constitution (1B)

Causation (students will construct a cause / effect chart tracing the causes and effects of the American Revolution).[CR8]



Periodization (students will construct a periodization chart in which they identify a beginning and ending date / event for the American Revolution; next they will identify specific details which reinforce / contradict commonly held beliefs of the period).[CR10]
Essay: Assess the relationship between Indians and Europeans in Colonial America. Confine your answers between 1607-1763. (CR5)

Essay: Discuss the impact of Salutary Neglect in early Colonial America. Confine your answers to 1607-1763. (CR5)


Unit 4: From Washington to the Era of Good Feelings 1789-1824 11 days Ch 6-8

Organizing Principles (Politics and Power, America in the World, Environment and Geography, Ideas, Beliefs, Culture, Work, Exchange, Technology, Identify, Peopling)


  1. Between 1789 and 1824, conflict over the increasing power of the national government created intensified sectional tension.




  1. Between 1789 and 1824, geographic isolation allowed the United States to pursue a policy of selective involvement in world affairs.




  1. Between 1789 and 1824, political parties, presidents, and the nation debated the authority of the Constitution through strict and loose constructionism.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7


The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2016
send message

    Main page