British Literature II eng 2020, Section 0892 Course Syllabus Course Description



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British Literature II

ENG 2020, Section 0892

Course Syllabus


Course Description

This class will introduce you to the literature of the United Kingdom from roughly 1750 to the present day. The main literary movements we will cover include Romanticism, Victorianism, and Modernism.

If you've taken online courses before, you'll notice that this is one is quite different, designed to emulate the classroom experience (and responsibilites). There may be bit of a learning curve as you get used to the rhythm of the class. You are expected to read, take quizzes, "attend" the lectures, and participate. Indeed, each of these aspects are "sequenced" so that you must do one to get to the next. It is therefore a pretty intense class, with long online lectures and lessons, and whereas the reading may not be intense (sometimes just a few poems), the level of understanding, engagement with the material, and participation are expected to be very high.

That being said, you do have freedom within each weekly session, which consist of two "classes" each.  I expect you to listen to all the lectures in each session -- break them up into smaller sessions, if need be. Discussions and exams will depend upon the content of the lectures (i.e. this isn't the kind of online course where I just send you off to read some articles, do a quiz, and move on. This is lecture driven). The class modules are staggered in such a way that you need to complete each task in order to open up the next, but you have a week to do so. 


Course Goals

By the end of the semester, students will have a familiarity with the overarching trends of the periods, and the general/work style of major figures, as well as the historical, political, social, and cultural tensions and how they affected the literature of the time.



Professor Information

Dr. David M. Earle

Office: Bldg 50, Room, 247

Email: dearle@uwf.edu

 

Office Hours and Communication: Office hours will be via email and discussion board. I will respond the quickest to emails, and if the question/comment is helpful to the class as a whole, I shall remove your name and post it to the discussion board. But expect at least 24 hous for a response. Due to the large number of student inquiries in this class, please post general questions to the course website under the discussion board prompt "General Class Concerns," and save questions regarding your particular situation to email.  Additionally, please check the course website prior to posting or contacting me to confirm that your question has not previously been answered. ("News" and "Discussions" are good places to check).

Due to the on-line nature of this course, course communication will occur primarily via eLearning and via "Groupmail." It is thestudent's responsibility to check elearning and their email  regularly. Failure to do so may result in missed instructions/assignments.

Texts / Materials

I'll be supplying all the reading material for the class, either through pdfs or links to online texts. For the most part, texts will be drawn from The Norton Anthology of British Literature,  either the Eighth or Ninth Editions, as well as open access electronic texts. Page numbers will refer to these texts and are hold overs to earlier versions of this class where I made the Norton mandatory for students. Whereas this will result in some confusion and flipping through pages, I daresay that is preferrable to me having you buy an $80 book. 

There are two exceptions to the online reading depending upon whether you prefer reading actual books or online texts. These are the two longer works we'll be reading: Frankenstein and Heart of Darkness. If you want to buy a material version of Frankenstein, I suggest 

Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, Signet Classics.

ISBN-13: 978-0451527714

If you decide to use an online or different edition, it is important to make sure it is the 1831 text with the "Author's Introduction." Besides that, page references in my lectures will correspond to this Signet edition. 

As far as Heart of Darkness goes, any edition is fine but I suggest the Dover thrift edition available on Amazon, mostly because it is inexpensive. The lectures will refer to the pages of the Norton, so don't be confused.

All the texts will be available under "course documents" and linked within the individual class modules



Required Materials:

  • Internet Access (broadband is recommended)

  • Activated UWF ArgoNet E-mail Account

  • Headphones/Speakers for lectures

As well as the texts we will be examining, I will occasionally provide links to other sources, such as pdfs or videos, in the learning modules and online lectures. I encourage students to explore these additional materials in order to enhance your experience in the course.

Topics:


Broadly speaking, the three main areas of study shall include Romanticism, Victorianism, and Modernism. Mostly, these are organized around different major authors, but sometimes they'll be organized around a topic such as "World War One Poetry" or "The Woman Question." 

Weekly Topics (two modules per week) include:



  • The Enlightenment and the French Revolution Debate

  • First Generation Romantics: Wordsworth and Coleridge

  • Second Generation Romantics: Keats and Shelley

  • Frankenstein

  • Victorianism

  • Tennyson, Imperialism, and the "Woman Question" 

  • Doyle, Stephenson, and Degeneration

  • Thomas Hardy, Intro to Modernism

  • Conrad's "Heart of Darkness"

  • WWI Poetry and W.B. Yeats

  • Joyce and Woolf

Class Organization 

Each module is staggered to open as you work through it: quizzes open the lecture. The lecture opens the discussion prompts. Once you post to the discussion board, the study guide/lecture outline will be released. It is therefore necessary to complete each aspect. Important: the quizzes will only be available for four days (a new module opens every wed and sun at 12:01 AM); you NEED to take the quiz in this time or the lecture wont be accessible. Once you take the quiz, then the lecture will remain open and accessible. Once the quiz closes, and if you haven't submitted it, then you've lost the option to hear the lecture, contribute to the discussions, etc -- just as if you missed class.



Course Schedule and Assignments

Dates

Module Title/ Topic

Course Material

Assignments

Due Dates

1/6-1/12

Week 1 -Enlightenment to Romanticism

  1. Read the General Introduction to Romanticism and the Burke and Wollestonecraft sections of the "Revolution Controversy and the 'Spirit of the Age'" Cluster

  2. Watch Lecture (I'd suggest breaking this one in two. Take notes)

  3. Contribute to Discussion Board, which will open the study guide.

  4. Download or Print the Study Guide

  1. Complete Bio Info in " Meet your Classmates"

  2. Complete  Discussion on Lecture

 Opens Midnight 1/6. Discussions are due, 12 am 1/12

1/12-1/19

Week 2: Wordsworth and Coleridge

  1. Download and read Wordsworth, “Preface to Lyrical Ballads,”  “Lines Composed…”

  2. Download and read Coleridge: “Eolian Harp,” “Kubla Khan” (with intro),  “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”  

  3. Take Quiz to open Wordsworth Lecture

  4. Watch Lecture 

  5. Take Coleridge Quiz

  6. Watch Coleridge Lecture (which will open discussion prompts)

  7. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  8. Print out or download study guide




  1. Complete Wordsworth Quiz

  2. Complete Coleridge Quiz

  3. Contribute to Weekly discussion prompts

Quiz needs to be completed by 12am, 1/19

1/19-1/26

Week 3 - Keats and Shelley

  1. Read Keats:  “On Seeing the Elgin Marbles,” “Ode to a nightingale.” 

  2. Shelley: “To Wordsworth,”  “Mont Blanc,”  “Men of England,”  “England, 1819” 

  3. Take Quizzes to open Lectures

  4. Watch Lectures Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  5. Print out or download study guide

  1. Complete Quizzes

  2. Watch Lectures

  3. Contribute to Weekly Discussion Prompts

Quiz needs to be completed by midnight 1/26

1/26-2/2

Week 4: Frankenstein part I

  1. Read Frankenstein through Chapter 13 

  2. Take Quiz to open Lecture

  3. Watch Lecture 

  4. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  5. Print out or download study guide

  1. Complete Quiz

  2. Contribute to the Discussion Board

Quiz needs to be completed by midnight 2/2

2/2-2/9

Week 5 – Frankenstein part II

  1. Finish Frankenstein 

  2. Take Quiz to open Lecture

  3. Watch Lecture 

  4. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  5. Print out or download study guide

  1. Complete Quiz 

  2. Contribute to the Discussion Board

 

Quiz needs to be completed by midnight 2/9

2/12

Exam I 

Covering Romanticism

 

Feb 12 (between 12:01 am and 11:59 pm)

2/9 -2/16

Week 6 - Intro to Victorianism  

  1. Read the general Introduction to "The Victorian Age." 

  2. Watch Lecture 

  3. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  4. Print out or download study guide

  1. Contribute to the Discussion Board

 

 n/a

2/16-2/23

Week 7 –Tennyson and The Woman Question

  1.   Read Tennyson, “The Epic [Morte d’Arthur],” “The Lady of Shallot,”  “Ulysses,”  “Charge of the Light Brigade”

  2. read “The Woman Question" cluster: Ellis, Patmore." Elizabeth Barret Browning, “[The education of] Aurora Leigh.”  Christina Rossetti, “The Goblin Market,”

  3. Take Quiz to open Lectures

  4. Watch Lectures

  5. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  6. Print out or download study guide

  1.  Take Reading Quiz

  2. Contribute to the Discussion Board

 Quiz needs to be completed by midnight 2/23

2/23 -3/2

Week 8 – Doyle and Stevenson

  1. Read Doyle, "Man with the Twisted Lip," online;

  2. Robert Louis Stevenson, “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” 1643

  3. Take Quiz to open Lectures

  4. Watch Lectures

  5. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  6. Print out or download study guide

  1.  Take Reading Quizzes

  2. Contribute to the Discussion Board

 Quiz needs to be completed by midnight 3/2

3/5

Exam II

Covering Victorianism

3/5

3/5, Open from 12:02 AM – 11:59 pm

3/2-3/9

Week 9 - Introduction to Modernism and Hardy

  1. Read the General Introduction to Modernism; Read intro to "Modernist Manifestos," and excerpts from Blast and "some Imagist Poetry";

  2. Read Matthew Arnold, “Dover Beach”; Text’s Intro to Modernism; Thomas Hardy, Thomas Hardy, Hardy “Hap,” “The Darkling Thrush,” “Channel Firing,” Who’s that Digging on my Grave

  3. Watch Modernism Lecture 

  4. Take Hardy Quiz,

  5. Watch Hardy Lecture (which will open discussion prompts)

  6. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  7. Print out or download study guide

 

    1. Take Hardy Quiz

    2. Contribute to Discussion Board

 Quiz n/a to be completed by midnight 3/9

3/9-3/16

Week 10: No Class—Spring Break










3/16-3/23

Week 11 - Conrad's "Heart of Darkness," “Preface” and part I

  1. Read Conrad, “Preface to The Nigger of the Narcissus”; “Heart of Darkness,” Part

  2. Take Quiz to open first Conrad Lecture

  3. Watch Lecture 

  4. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  5. Print out or download study guide

 

  1. Take Conrad I quiz

 Quiz needs to be completed by midnight 3/23

3/23-3/30

Week 12 – Conrad’s HOD, parts 2 & 3

  1. Read HOD, parts 2 & 3

  2. Take second Quiz,

  3. Watch second Conrad Lecture (which will open discussion prompts)

  4. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  5. Print out or download study guide




  1. Take second Conrad quiz

  2. Contribute to the Discussion Board




Quiz needs to be completed by midnight 3/30

3/30-4/6

Week 13 - "Voices from WWI" and Yeats

  1. Read “Voices from WWI,” and supplemental poetry

  2. Read Yeats: “Lake of Innisfree,” “Who Goes with Fergus,”  “Sept. 1913,” “Easter 1916,” ”Second Coming,” “Sailing to Byzantium,” “The Circus Animal’s Desertion.”

  3. Take WWI Quiz

  4. Watch WWI Lecture 

  5. Take Yeats Quiz

  6. Watch Yeats Lecture (which will open discussion prompts)

  7. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  8. Print out or download study guide

  1. Take WWI Quiz

  2. Take Yeats Quiz

  3. Contribute to Discussion Board

 

Quiz needs to be completed by midnight 4/6

4/6-4/13

Week 14: Joyce and Woolf

  1. James Joyce: “The Sisters” (handout), “Araby.”

  2. Virginia Woolf, “Modern Fiction” “Professions for Women” “A Sketch of the Past”  

  3. Take Joyce Quiz to open Joyce Lecture I

  4. Watch Joyce Lecture 

  5. Take Woolf Quis

  6. Watch Woolf Lecture (which will open discussion prompts)

  7. Contribute to Discussion Board (which will open study guide)

  8. Print out or download study guide

 

  1.  Take Quizzes

  2. Contribute to Discussion Board

Quiz needs to be completed by midnight 4/13

4/13-4/23

Week 15: Exam Preparation










4/23

Week 16: Exam III

 

 4/23

 Available, 4/23 between 12:01 am – 11:59 pm.

Assignments

Quizzes: There will be quizzes on the reading that must be taken before the lecture can be accessed in the learning module. These will be short and of differing types, ranging from True/False to short answer. It is imperative that you read before hand, since if you try to use your texts, you'll run out of time. You will have 6- 10 minutes for each quiz, depending upon the number of questions. Since much of the reading consists of poetry and short reading assignments, a deeper level of reading will be expected.

Discussion Questions: Whereas the quizzes test basic comprehension, the Discussion questions that follow the lectures test more abstract literary tropes such as symbolism, theme, characterization, etc...These Discussion prompts will often ask you to identify key objects and explain their importance to both plot and the larger "meaning" of the story. These questions stem from both the reading and the lectures and are to be attempted only after the lectures are listened to. I will give you a choice of a number of prompts, you will respond to two of them on the discussion board. This will open up the lecture study guides. Once you post your discussion prompts, I'll go through them and post or release a selection of them to the board; you are also required to respond to at least one of these; these responses will add to your participation grade.

Exams: There will be three exams over the course of the semester, each one dedicated to a major literary movement. They shall be released about four days after we finish a section. The questions shall draw from readings, the on-line lectures, and discussion board prompts. Some, but not all of the material, may come from daily quizzes and discussion prompts. The exams themselves will be of varied composition: short answer, identification, and both short (one to two paragraph) and long timed essays. The goal is not only to test the student's basic comprehension, but also the student's ability to make larger connections across and between movements and authors.

I will designate an online "study session" a few days before each exam, as well as release a general study guide for the lecture. I can't stop you from using your books for the exam, but I have timed the exams in such a way that if you spend too much time with your books on the early quantifiable questions, you'll run out of time on the later qualifiable essay questions. It is therefore necessary that you study!  



Grading Policy 

Your grade will consist of three exams, quizzes, and participation on the discussion board.



Quizzes: 20%

Discussion and Participation: 20%

Exam 1: 20%

Exam 2: 20%

Exam 3: 20%

Attendance Policy

Again, let me reiterate that this in an on-line class. It is the student's responsibility to check the due dates for quizzes, discussion assignments, and the exams. Late exams, quizzes, and discussion assignments will not be accepted. Once the due date for an assignment has passed, it will no longer be available in eLearning. Assignments not completed as scheduled will receive a grade of zero.



Minimum Technical Skills and Special Technology Utilized by Students

This course is totally on-line. All instructional content and interaction takes place over the WWW. In addition to baseline word processing skills and sending/receiving email with attachments, students will be expected to search the internet and upload / download files. In addition, students may need one or more of the following plug-ins:



  • Adobe Acrobat Reader: http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

  • PowerPoint Viewer: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=048DC840-14E1-467D-8DCA-19D2A8FD7485&displaylang=en

  • Windows Media Player: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia/download/

  • QuickTime Player: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/

  • Real Player: http://www.real.com/realplayer/search

  • Adobe Flash Player: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

  • eLearning's Accessibilty Resource Guides for users: http://www.desire2learn.com/access/resources/





Expectations for Academic Conduct / Plagiarism Policy

Academic Conduct Policy: (Web Site) | (PDF Format) | 


Plagiarism Policy: (WORD Format) | UWF Library Online Tutorial: Plagiarism |
Student Handbook: (PDF Format)

Assistance for Students with Disabilities

The Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC) at the University of West Florida supports an inclusive learning environment for all students. If there are aspects of the instruction or design of this course that hinder your full participation, such as time-limited exams, inaccessible web content, or the use of non-captioned videos and podcasts, please notify the instructor or the SDRC as soon as possible. You may contact the SDRC office by e-mail at sdrc@uwf.edu or by phone at (850) 474-2387. Appropriate academic accommodations will be determined based on the documented needs of the individual.



Accessibility Resources

  • Follow this link for information on accessibility settings in eLearning.

  • Follow this link for information on accessibility features in UWF's Learning Management System (LMS), Desire2Learn.

 

TurnItIn

UWF maintains a university license agreement for an online text matching service called TurnItIn.  At my discretion, I will use the TurnItIn service to determine the originality of student papers.  If I submit your paper to TurnItIn, it will be stored in a TurnItIn database for as long as the service remains in existence.  If you object to this storage of your paper:



  1. You must let me know no later than two weeks after the start of this class. 

  2. I will utilize other services and techniques to evaluate your work for evidence of appropriate authorship practices.

Weather Emergency Information

In the case of severe weather or other emergency, the campus might be closed and classes cancelled. Official closures and delays are announced on the UWF website and broadcast on WUWF-FM.



  • WUWF-FM (88.1MHz) is the official information source for the university. Any pertinent information regarding closings, cancellations, and the re-opening of campus will be broadcast.

  • In the event that hurricane preparation procedures are initiated, the UWF Home Web Page and Argus will both provide current information regarding hurricane preparation procedures, the status of classes and the closing of the university.

Emergency plans for the University of West Florida related to weather or other emergencies are available on the following UWF web pages:

  • Information about hurricane preparedness plans is available on the UWF web site:
    http://uwfemergency.org/hurricaneprep.cfm

  • Information about other emergency procedures is available on the UWF web site:
    http://uwfemergency.org/


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