Course Catalog Advanced Placement & College Now 2006-2007 Course Catalog Table of Contents



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Staten Island Technical High School

Vincent Maniscalco, Principal



Advanced Placement

and

College Now
2006-2007 Course Catalog

Advanced Placement & College Now

2006-2007 Course Catalog

Table of Contents
Advanced Placement Courses
Welcome to the AP Program 3

Selection Criteria Explanation 4

AP Selection Criteria Chart 5
Science
AP Biology* 6

AP Chemistry* 7

AP Physics* 8

Forensic Science* (Non-AP) 9

Biotechnology and Molecular Sciences (Non-AP) 10
Humanities
AP English Language and Composition 11

AP English Literature and Composition* 12

College Creative Writing* (Non-AP) 13

AP World History* 14

AP United States History 15

AP United States Government and Politics 16

AP Macroeconomics 17

AP Russian 18


Math
AP Calculus AB and BC 19
College Now
Welcome to the College Now Program 21

College Now Course Descriptions 22

* Denotes college credit granted via the St. John’s College Extension Program.

Welcome to the AP® Program
The Advanced Placement Program (AP) is a collaborative effort between motivated students; dedicated teachers; and committed high schools, colleges, and universities. Since its inception in 1955, the Program has enabled millions of students to take college-level courses and exams, and to earn college credit or placement, while still in high school.
Most colleges and universities in the United States, as well as colleges and universities in more than 30 other countries, have an AP policy grant­ing incoming students credit, placement, or both on the basis of their AP Exam grades. Many of these institutions grant up to a full year of college credit (sophomore standing) to students who earn a sufficient number of qualifying AP grades.
Each year, an increasing number of parents, students, teachers, high schools, and colleges and universities turn to the AP Program as a model of educational excellence.
More information about the AP Program is available at the AP student site (www.collegeboard.com/apstudents).


AP Courses & Exams Offered at Staten Island Technical High School
12 AP courses in a wide variety of subject areas are available now at Staten Island Technical High School.
Each AP course has a corresponding exam that participating schools worldwide administer in May. AP Exams contain multiple-choice questions and a free-response section (either essay or problem solving). AP Exams are a culminating assessment in all AP courses and are thus an integral part of the program. As a result, many schools, such as Staten Island Technical High School, foster the expectation that students who enroll in an AP course will take the corre­sponding AP Exam.
The cost for taking the exam is $82.00 (cost is subject to change). There is a fee reduction available for families requiring financial support.


St. John’s College Extension Program
Staten Island Technical High School participates in the St. John’s College Extension program offering college credit to juniors and seniors in selected courses. This is an excellent opportunity to gain college credits at a nominal cost. Students are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity.

Students in the following courses have an opportunity to register for college credit through their high school in both the fall and spring semesters.

The following courses have been approved for credit:


Courses

Credits per Semester

AP Biology

4

AP Chemistry

5

AP Physics

4

AP Literature (fall semester only)

3

AP World History

3

College Creative Writing

(One semester only, Fall or Spring)



3

Registration takes place in early September and February through the subject classes. The nominal fee is $150 per semester per course (cost is subject to change). Student must adhere to deadlines in order to register.


For a listing of schools that don’t accept St. John’s College Extension Credits, please visit Staten Island Technical High School’s website www.siths.org .

AP Course Selection Criteria Explained:
The Advanced Placement Course Selection Criteria is designed to give priority to those students with accumulated credit and demonstrated academic excellence in a specific subject area.

EXAMPLE #1






PSAT

2 %


REGENTS

14%


REGENTS

4 %


CLASS AVERAGES

70 %

TEACHER RECOMMENDATION

10 %

AP Chemistry

Math

Percentile



Living Env. Regents (SXRK)

Chemistry Regents (SXRX)

Math A Regents (MXRA)


Physics Regents (SXR$)

Sci. Engineering Res Prog

(SCOR)


1) Living Environment 1 (S$1)

2) Living Environment 2 (S$2)

3) Chemistry 1 (SC1)

4) Chemistry 2 (SC2)

5) Physics 1 (SP1)

Rating: 0-100




Using the criteria reflected in the above table for AP Chemistry, let’s examine two contrasting scenarios in which a sophomore and a junior apply for the same Advanced Placement Chemistry course.


  • PSAT, CLASS AVERAGES and TEACHER RECOMMENDATION CATEGORIES – Let’s begin by examining above the three shaded categories and their subsequent criteria. Our immediate question then becomes, “How is a partial power score for each student determined?”

ANSWER: If a student attains a “perfect score” in his/her PSAT, CLASS AVERAGES and TEACHER RECOMMENDATION categories, that student would receive a partial power score of 2% + 70% +10% = 82% . If a student does not have a “perfect score,” then he/she will receive the designated percentage of his/her overall average in that category.




  • REGENTS CATEGORIES - The remaining 18% of the student’s power score is calculated through his/her Regents scores shown in the shaded categories below. That is, the Living Environment, Chemistry and Math A Regents account for 14%, while the Physics Regents and SERP program encompass the remaining 4%.

Under the heading “Regents 14%,” if a student completed his/her Living Environment and Math A Regents, then he/she will be awarded 4.66 % (of the Regents grade) for each Regents taken and will not receive 4.66% for not having a Chemistry Regents grade.


Under the heading “Regents 4%,” if a student completed his/her Physics Regents, then he/she is will be awarded 2 % (of the Regents grade) for that Regents, but will not receive 2 % for not taking S.E.R.P. (an honors level Science, Engineering Research Program).





PSAT

2 %

REGENTS

14%

REGENTS

4 %

CLASS AVERAGES

70 %

TEACHER RECOMMENDATION

10 %

AP Chemistry

Math Percentile

Living Env. Regents (SXRK)

Chemistry Regents (SXRX)

Math A Regents (MXRA)


Physics Regents (SXR$)

Sci. Engineering Res Prog

(SCOR)


1) Living Environment 1 (S$1)

2) Living Environment 2 (S$2)

3) Chemistry 1 (SC1)

4) Chemistry 2 (SC2)

5) Physics 1 (SP1)

Rating: 0-100




EXAMPLE #2
Example #2 involves two students, a Sophomore and a Junior, who wish to apply for the same Advanced Placement Chemistry course. Please take the time to examine how both their final power scores were calculated and the significance of 91.3% vs. 94.71%. *


Sophomore

Grade Received

Power Score




Junior

Grade Received

Power Score

2 % - PSAT


Math - 100

2 %




2 % - PSAT


Math – 100

2 %

14 % - Regents


100 (Liv Env)

100 (Math A)

n/a (Chem)


4.66 %

4.66%

0 %




14 % - Regents


100 (Liv Env)

78 (Math A)

100 (Chem)



4.66 %

3.63%

4.66%

4 % - Regents


n/a Phys

n/a SERP


0 %

0 %




4 % - Regents


n/a Phys

100 SERP


0 %

2 %

70 % - Class Avg.


100 (Living Env. 1)

100 (Living Env. 2)

100 (Chemistry 1)

100 (Chemistry 2)

100 (Physics 1)


70%




70 % - Class Avg.


100 (Living Env. 1)

89 (Living Env. 2)

100 (Chemistry 1)



95 (Chemistry 2)

100 (Physics 1)



67.76 %

10 % - Teacher Rec.

100

10 %




10 % - Teacher Rec.

100

10 %




Power Score:

91.3 %







Power Score:

* 94.71 %


* On the list of candidates for the AP Chemistry class, the Junior with a 94.71% power score will rank higher than the Sophomore.

AP Course Selection Criteria

2006-2007





AP Biology* Junior/Senior Year
The Course
The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. After showing themselves to be qualified on the AP Exam, some students, in their freshman year, are permitted to undertake upper-level courses in biology or to register for courses for which biology is a prerequisite. Other students may have fulfilled a basic requirement for a laboratory-science course and will be able to undertake other courses to pursue their majors.
AP Biology should include those topics regularly covered in a college biology course for majors. The college course in biology differs signifi­cantly from the usual first high school course in biology (Living Environment) with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the type of laboratory work done by students, and the time and effort required of students. The textbooks used for AP Biology are those used by college biology majors. The kinds of labs done by AP students must are the equivalent of those done by college students.

Prerequisites
The AP Biology course is designed to be taken by students after the suc­cessful completion of a first course in high school biology and one in high school chemistry. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.

Goals of the Course
The AP Biology Exam seeks to be representative of the topics covered by the survey group. Accordingly, goals have been set for percentage cover­age of three general areas:
I. Molecules and Cells, 25%

II. Heredity arid Evolution, 25%

III. Organisms and Populations, 50%
These three areas have been subdivided into major categories with percentage goals specified for each. The exam is constructed using the percent­age goals as guidelines for question distribution.
The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and an appreciation of science as a process. The ongoing knowledge explosion in biology makes these goals even more challenging. Primary emphasis in an AP Biology course is on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on mem­orizing terms and technical details. Essential to this conceptual under­standing are a grasp of science as a process rather than as an accumulation of facts; personal experience in scientific inquiry; recognition of uniting themes that integrate the major topics of biology; and application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns.
Themes, Topics, and Concepts
Themes, topics, and concepts all give structure to an AP Biology course. Themes are overarching features of biology that apply throughout the curriculum, and are often the subject of constructed response questions on the AP exam. Topics are the subject areas in biology, and concepts are the most important ideas that form our current understanding of a particular topic.
The major themes of the AP Biology course are as follows:


I. Science as a Process

II. Evolution

III. Energy Transfer

IV. Continuity and Change

V. Relationship of Structure to Function

VI. Regulation

VII. Interdependence in Nature

VIII. Science, Technology, and Society

* Students who take this course will receive 4 college credits (per term / 8 credits total) via the St. John’s College Extension program.



AP Chemistry* Junior/Senior Year
The Course
The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, in their college freshman year, second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where general chemistry is a prerequi­site. For other students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses.
AP Chemistry will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course will contribute to the development of the stu­dents’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. The college course in general chemistry dif­fers qualitatively from the usual first secondary school course in chemistry with respect to the kind of textbook used, the topics covered, the empha­sis on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of princi­ples, and the kind of laboratory work done by students. Quantitative differences appear in the number of topics treated, the time spent on the course by students, and the nature and the variety of experiments done in the laboratory.

Prerequisites
The AP Chemistry course is designated to be taken only after the success­ful completion of a first course in high school chemistry. Surveys of students who take the AP Chemistry Exam indicate that the probability of achieving a grade of 3 or higher is significantly greater for students who successfully complete a first course in high school chemistry prior to undertaking the AP course. Thus it is mandatory that credit in a first-year high school chemistry course be a prerequisite for enrollment in an AP Chemistry class. In addition, the recommended mathematics prerequisite for an AP Chemistry class is the successful completion of a second-year algebra course.

Time Allocations
It is assumed that the student will spend at least five hours a week in unsupervised individual study.
Topic Outline
The importance of the theoretical aspects of chemistry has brought about an increasing emphasis on these aspects of the content of general chem­istry courses. Topics such as the structure of matter, kinetic theory of gases, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, and the basic concepts of thermodynamics are presented in considerable depth.
The following list of topics for an AP course is intended to be a guide to the level and breadth of treatment expected rather than to be a syllabus. The percentage after each major topic indicates the approximate proportion of multiple-choice questions on the exam that pertain to the topic.
I. Structure of Matter (20%) Atomic theory / structure; Chemical bonding; Nuclear chemistry

II. States of Matter (20%) Gases; Liquids and Solids; Solutions

III. Reactions (35 - 40%) Reaction types; Stoichiometry; Equilibrium; Kinetics; Thermodynamics

IV. Descriptive Chemistry (10—15%)

V. Laboratory (5—10%)

* Students who take this course will receive 5 college credits (per term / 10 credits total) via the St. John’s College Extension program.



AP Physics* Senior Year
The Course
Two AP Physics Exams, identified as Physics B and Physics C, are offered. These exams are designed to test student achievement in the Physics B and Physics C courses, as described below. These courses are intended to be representative of courses commonly offered in colleges and universities, but they do not necessarily correspond precisely to courses at any particular institution.
Prerequisites & Goals of the Course
The AP Physics B course builds on the conceptual understanding attained in the New York State Regents Physics curriculum. This course provides a systematic development of the main principles of physics, emphasizing problem solving and helping students develop a deep understanding of physics concepts. It is assumed that students are familiar with algebra and trigonometry, although some theoretical developments may use basic concepts of calculus. In most colleges, this is a one-year terminal course including a laboratory component and is not the usual preparation for more advanced physics and engineering courses. However, Category B courses often provides a foundation in physics for students in the life sciences, premedicine, and some applied sciences, as well as other fields not directly related to science. The AP Physics B course is intended to be equivalent to such courses. This is representative of the Regents Physics curriculum that all junior must take.
The AP Physics B course covers the following major areas:


  1. Mechanics

  2. Heat & Thermodynamics

  3. Light and Geometric Optics

  4. Waves and Sound

  5. Fluids

  6. Electricity

  7. Magnetism

  8. Atomic and Nuclear Physics

  9. Quantum Physics

The AP Physics C course builds on the conceptual understanding attained in the New York State Regents Physics curriculum. This course normally forms the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. The sequence is parallel to or preceded by mathematics courses that include calculus. Methods of calculus are used in formulating physical principles and in applying them to physical problems. The sequence is more intensive and analytic than the AP Physics B course. Strong emphasis is placed on solving a variety of challenging problems, some requiring calculus, as well as continuing to develop a deep under­standing of physics concepts. A Category C sequence may be a very intensive one-year course in college but often will extend over one and one-half to two years, and a laboratory component is also included.

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