English department medium term plan



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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

MEDIUM TERM PLAN

YEAR 9

Detective Fiction

AIMS:

  • This scheme is designed to build students’ ability to produce formal essays, which are well organised and make appropriate use of references and quotations.

  • It is designed to make them enthusiastic about detective fiction, by exploring a variety of authors (and celebrated sleuths) through the last two centuries.

  • The final assessment (formal essay) should provide a solid base to build upon for the GCSE course.


DURATION: 6 weeks
RESOURCES: Copies of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (Penguin)

Photocopied booklet of The Philomel Cottage

Numerous worksheets including:

Photocopied extracts of Inspector Morse

Extracts from other Holmes stories

Writing frame(s)



Character study sheets

Most students will: read the two main short stories in class and building on prior knowledge, be able to identify key aspects of the writers’ craft (Christie and Conan Doyle). They will also be able to to use the Point Evidence Explain formula to produce a formal essay which compares and contrasts two detective stories.
Some students will not have progressed so far and will: be able to make comments about the texts studied, identifying key features about character and setting. These students will be encouraged to produce a shorter essay using a writing frame as a guide. Each teacher will use their discretion with regard to the use of quotations, guiding weaker pupils to relevant extracts.
Some students will have progressed further and will: be able to produce a formal essay in which they have identified key extracts which justify their comments. More able students will also make use of other extracts of modern detective fiction, by identifying the development of the detective character through time.


KEY TEACHING AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES




TEXT LEVEL - READING

  • Compare themes and styles of two writers from different times (R9)

  • Extend their understanding of literary heritage by relating major writers to their historical context, and explaining their appeal over time (R15)

  • Discuss a substantial prose text, sharing perceptions, negotiating common readings and accounting for differences of view (R18)




TEXT LEVEL - WRITING



  • Explore how non-fiction texts can convey information or ideas in amusing or entertaining ways; (W7)

  • Explain the precise connections between ideas with clarity and an appropriate degree of formality; (W10)

  • Cite specific and relevant textual evidence to justify critical judgements about texts. (W17)




SENTENCE LEVEL


  • Integrate speech, reference and quotation effectively into what they write (S4)




WORD LEVEL


  • applying knowledge of word origins, families and morphology;

  • identifying with words through strategies which include:

  • common spelling patterns and conventions in their growing vocabulary;

(Wd4)




TEXT LEVEL – SPEAKING AND LISTENING


  • Discuss and evaluate conflicting evidence to arrive at a considered viewpoint; (S&L9)




R15 Extend their understanding of literary heritage by relating major writers to their

historical context, and explaining their appeal over time


WEEK 1 – INTRODUCTION TO DETECTIVE FICTION



Objectives:


Resources:
SP to deliver talk to each group (40mins) about Jack the Ripper

Worksheets: Conan Doyle biography

Victorian London sheet

The Hound of the Baskervilles extract



Focus:


  • Sue Parry delivers a talk to the group about Jack the Ripper with the focus on crime in Victorian London.




  • Pupils conduct research work into Victorian London.

From this they learn about the emergence of detective fiction as a new genre (Poe is credited with the first detective book, but Conan Doyle created the first regular sleuth).

  • Pupils find out about the character of Holmes - Biography

Based on Conan Doyle’s tutor in Edinburgh (Dr Joseph Bell)

Sherlock Holmes appears in The Strand magazine

Popular image of Holmes (deer-stalker hat, pipe etc created not by the stories, but by the illustrator of The Strand).


  • Pupils discuss and then complete the Watching the Detectives worksheet which asks them to consider the formula of the detective story based on what they know from TV and/or literature.




  • Group work – Why do we enjoy detective fiction?

-Solving the puzzle

-A hero figure in society

-Watching the criminal pay

-Excitement of murder and danger




  • Pupils look at an extract from The Hound of the Baskervilles.

How does Conan Doyle build up suspense in the scene?

Teacher-led exercise in which the pupils consider how the writer creates atmosphere and suspense (produce a chart). *This could be used alongside the Hound of the Baskervilles video extract to help pupils create a storyboard of the chosen scene.


Outcomes:


  • Students have an appreciation of the historical background to Holmes and the genre.

  • Students must produce a story board which clearly makes use of the writer’s choice of words/phrases from the Hound of the Baskervilles extract.




W7 Explore how non-fiction texts can convey information or ideas in amusing or

entertaining ways



S4 Integrate speech, reference and quotation effectively into what they write

S&L9 Discuss and evaluate conflicting evidence to arrive at a considered viewpoint
WEEK 2 – THE SPECKLED BAND



Objectives:
Resources:

The Speckled Band (in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes)

Worksheets:Holmes character study

Helen Stoner’s speech

Helping Holmes with his investigations

Mystery and suspense


Focus:


  • Pupils begin reading The Speckled Band in class (the scheme is designed so that all the reading is done in class).

  • Stop! at the point “forming an opinion about the matter”:

At this point, pupils should be asked to find quotations which give the reader clues about the character of Holmes (weaker pupils can be given the extract sheet, more able pupils will be able to skim the text for valuable information).

Read on.


  • Stop! at the point “she dropped her thick black veil and glided from the room”:

At this point pupils should engage in a discussion. They have heard all the clues which Holmes has at this point, encourage them to be literary detectives and to try to solve the crime, using prompt sheets, from the clues so far they need to find

Suspect – Grimesby Roylott

Motive – the inheritance

Opportunity – the strange goings on in Stoke Moran.


Look also at the extract on the mystery and suspense sheet and ask pupils to write about how Conan Doyle builds suspense.
Outcomes:

Pupils produce Dr Watson’s diary about the visit from Helen Stoner. They need to include the main points as they see them, thereby identifying the key clues which they believe are pertinent to the case. This ensures sound comprehension of this difficult and at times confusing story opening.



Wd7 Recognise layers of meaning in the writer’s choice of words, e.g. connotation, implied

meaning, different types or multiple meanings;



S4 Integrate speech, reference and quotation effectively into what they write

S&L9 Discuss and evaluate conflicting evidence to arrive at a considered viewpoint

R18 Discuss a substantial prose text, sharing perceptions, negotiating common readings and accounting for differences of view


WEEK 3 – THE SPECKLED BAND cont’d



Objectives:


Resources: The Speckled Band

Worksheets: Investigating Dr Roylott

Settings in the story
Focus:


  • This week should be devoted to finishing the story.

Based on previous weeks work, teachers can use their discretion about which points of the story deserve discussion i.e. were the pupils’ guesses correct about the crime?


  • Pupils should use their prior knowledge to complete the Settings in the Story sheet.




  • They should also move onto the character of Dr Roylott. Weaker pupils can use the worksheet to help them find important prompts. Stronger pupils will be able to skim the text for clues as to his character.

For the above, use:


Point


Evidence

Explain

So that pupils recognise the importance of using the text to justify their claims, and then explaining their ideas. This will be the basis of their essay technique for their final assessment.


Outcomes:
Pupils produce a character study of Dr Roylott using the point evidence explain technique.


W17 Cite specific and relevant textual evidence to justify critical judgements about texts.

Wd4 Address personal difficulties experimenting with different ways of learning and remembering difficult spellings, e.g. mnemonics



  • Applying knowledge of word origins, families and morphology

  • Identifying with words through strategies which include

  • Common spelling patterns and conventions in their growing vocabulary

R9 Compare themes and styles of two writers from different times
WEEK 4 – HOLMES AND BEYOND



Objectives:

Resources: Holmes character study.

Chosen extracts of Patricia Cornwell and Colin Dexter.

Detective character worksheet.

Focus:
Pupils should begin by feeding back about the work on Dr Roylott. Attention should be paid to how they have completed the PEE format of answering the question.


  • As an extension to this, and to consolidate the work already done, pupils should use the character sheet, and their chosen moments from the book to build up a character profile of Sherlock Holmes (PEE format).



  • Moving away from Holmes…


Ask pupils to consider from their own knowledge how the genre has changed – it is no longer the realm of the super sleuth, but about a more gritty realism. See Judy Hammer in Southern Cross and answer questions.


  • Teachers could perhaps produce charts/group presentations about current detectives which they are aware of, focussing on how the detective figure has changed (See JA – loats of Wexford, Morse and Dalgleish in library).

Pupils should then be led through the extracts of Inspector Morse, and the Southern Cross by Patricia Cornwell noting any clues about the character – compare to Holmes.

Pupils will be expected to identify the contrasts between the sleuths over the last century considering such issues as:

Women as the central hero

The nature of the crime

The anti-hero detective – alcoholic etc

A new breed of villain


They should read the extracts carefully (teachers to use discretion about which extract(s) to use depending on ability and timing).
Pupils create their own detective. They must produce a story opening which does not necessarily focus on creating a crime, but sets the scene with an in-depth character description. They can create a detective in the classic mould or on the modern detective.

Outcomes:
Their own story opening in which their modern detective is introduced to the audience. This work must demonstrate that the pupils have understood how the writer conveys the character through:

More able pupils could also produce an accompanying evaluation of their detective explaining what kind of character they were trying to create, and referring to any fictional influences.



R9 Compare themes and styles of two writers from different times

R15 Extend their understanding of literary heritage by relating major writers to their

historical context, and explaining their appeal over time

W17 Cite specific and relevant textual evidence to justify critical judgements about texts.

Wd7 Recognise layers of meaning in the writer’s choice of words, e.g. connotation, implied

meaning, different types or multiple meanings;


WEEK 5 – AGATHA CHRISTIE’S THE PHILOMEL COTTAGE



Objectives:


Resources: The Philomel Cottage (photo copied short story)
Focus:
Begin with research work into Agatha Christie. When did she live etc. Who are her famous detectives? How are these characters like/unlike Sherlock Holmes?
Pupils to locate Christie works, then compare and contrast the characters of Sherlock Holmes and either Jane Marple or Hercule Poirot (lots of Christie books in the library. See JA). Character chart or spider diagram which considers appearance, attitude to clients, mannerisms, foibles, date of creation, how others react to them*.
Read chapter one. Pupils use prior knowledge of the genre to predict the outcome.

What clues has the writer given her audience?


The story should be read over two lessons (3 maximum).

Stop! at the end of pg53.

Consider the following questions

What might be happening at 9pm?

What has occurred in Gerald’s past?

What could be the truth about the payment for the cottage?

Pupils should consider motive and opportunity.


Stop! at the end of chapter 3

Who is Gerald?

What will happen?

How is Alix Martin acting as the detective in this story?


On completion:

Pupils fill in the prompt sheet to reinforce the story.

Pupils should consider the differences between the two stories. Points to consider are:

How the role of women has changed between the time Conan Doyle wrote, and the time Christie was writing (focus on the characters of Helen Stoner and Alix Martin).

The fact that there is no super sleuth involved. Does this help to create more tension in the story?

Moments of suspense in the two stories.



Questions left unanswered at the end of the story.

Outcomes:
Completion of the Philomel Cottage prompt sheet.

(Comparative essay to be written next week).

Background work on Agatha Christie (biography).
*Teachers may feel at this point that there has been a lot of written work for your group. This outcome can therefore take the form of a presentation, chart, or dossier-style written exercise.


R9 Compare themes and styles of two writers from different times

W10 Explain the precise connections between ideas with clarity and an appropriate degree of formality

W17 Cite specific and relevant textual evidence to justify critical judgements about texts.

Wd4 Address personal difficulties experimenting with different ways of learning and remembering difficult spellings, e.g. mnemonics



  • Applying knowledge of word origins, families and morphology

  • Identifying with words through strategies which include

  • Common spelling patterns and conventions in their growing vocabulary



WEEK 6 – PRODUCING A FORMAL ESSAY




Objectives:



Resources: The Speckled Band


The Philomel Cottage

Writing frame(s)



Focus:


  • The work so far has been building up to the production of their final essay.




  • Pupils should be confident to:

Locate appropriate textual references.

Make statements about the author’s craft

Use the PEE system with confidence

Write in paragraphs.


This weeks work depends very much on the ability of the class. Numerous writing frames are available to help with the completion of the essay entitled:

A Comparison of Two Detective Short Stories



The following lessons are designed to allow the pupils to work independently, while the teacher can circulate and offer assistance top whoever may need it.

Lesson 1 should be devoted to the preparation work: what comments will we make in our essay? Pupils should be encouraged to identify a number of points they want to make. Each point will be a paragraph, and each paragraph will, in turn be made up of the PEE system. Pupils should be given guidence as to how to approach the essay (i.e. one story after the other, or alternate paragraphs etc).
Lesson 2 should be a continuation of the preparation work, this time selecting the finer points which will be made and selecting appropriate quotations from the text. This may take some time, although pupils should have a good selection of quotations from The Speckled Band to use.
Lesson 3 Pupil should begin to write the essay, working closely from their notes. This is likely to be a rough draft.

Outcome:
Formal essay.


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