Human migration in atlantic canada nova scotia middle school



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HUMAN MIGRATION IN ATLANTIC CANADA NOVA SCOTIA – MIDDLE SCHOOL

Human Migration in Atlantic Canada
Lesson Overview:

The Human Migration Story is one that can be told at any grade level within any classroom in Canada. The focus of this lesson is to help students at a grade 8 and 9 level to use technology to access statistical data from Statistics Canada. Students will go through a series of activities that will generate a series of migration charts using the Excel software program. From the charts, students will analyze trends and make predictions with regard to migration in Atlantic Canada. Students will also be introduced to the concept of “push-pull” factors as well as G.E. Ravenstein’s Laws of Migration. Teachers can create many variations of this lesson or use some of the extension lessons offered at the end of the lesson plan.


Special Note: Statistics Canada is acknowledged for their considerable effort in putting forth many readily usable lessons for the classroom as well as a vast array of statistical data that can be used with pen and paper, software programs such as Excel, or inputted into a Geographic Information System (GIS) program such as Arcview.
Teachers are encouraged to get in touch with their local StatCan representative, and get on the Internet and explore the many benefits that Statistics Canada can bring to their classroom.

Grade Level:

Grade 8 and 9

Time Required:


One or two lessons (lesson length 60 minutes)
Curriculum Connection (Province and course):

Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation:

Atlantic Canada In The Global Community”, Grade 9, Nova Scotia (Nova Scotia Grade 9 Atlantic Studies), Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador, Grade 8, New Brunswick



Physical Setting 1.5

The students will be expected to, for example, identify and trace population and settlement patterns affecting Atlantic Canadians from aboriginal to early new-world migration to the present day.



      1. Suggest reasons for changes in settlement patterns in Atlantic Canada in the twentieth century

      2. Examine the attractions of living Atlantic Canada today

      3. Research out-migration in Atlantic Canada during the twentieth century and suggest reasons for this trend

      4. Discuss trends in population pattern that might appear in Atlantic Canada in the next decade

      5. Determine the percentage of the urban to rural population patters for each of the Atlantic provinces


Link to Canadian National Geography Standards:

Essential Element #1: The World in Spatial Terms

  • Geography studies the spatial relationships among people, places and environments. Maps reveal the complex spatial interactions that touch the lives of all citizens.

  • Map, globe and atlas use (e.g. observing and analyzing relationships)


Essential Element #4: Human Systems

  • Earth’s surface is shaped by human activities. The spatial organization of society is a mosaic of population movements, settlement patterns, economic activity, transportation, communication and political organizations.

  • Demographic transition

  • Impact of human migration

  • Changes in human patterns over time (from villages to mega cities)


Geographic Skill #1: Asking Geographic Questions

  • Plan and organize a geographic research project (e.g. specify a problem, pose a research question or hypothesis and identify data sources).


Geographic Skill #3: Organize Geographic Information

  • Select and design appropriate forms of maps to organize geographic information

  • Select and design appropriate forms of graphs, diagrams, tables and charts to organize geographic information

  • Use a variety of media to develop and organize integrated summaries of geographic information



Additional Resources, Materials and Equipment Required:


  • Access to the Internet

  • Map blanks of Atlantic Canada

  • Student activity sheets (attached)

  • World map



Main Objective:


  • To have students understand the migration patterns and trends within Atlantic Canada.

  • To develop this understanding by collecting, analyzing and displaying various types of data.



Learning Outcomes:


By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

  • Acquire information about migration.

  • To access information from Statistics Canada, E-STAT.**

(Some access is by password only. Make sure you have registered for an account before proceeding with students)

  • Collect and compile information.

  • Interpret information obtained from maps, graphs, and data tables.

  • Analyze data, identify trends and make predictions.

  • Create maps.

  • Develop an understanding of the relationship between migration & push pull factors.


The Lesson:






Teacher Activity

Student Activity

Introduction

Teacher will put up a map of the world and give the students one large colour dot for each of their grand parents. Then have the students in-turn put each dot on the birth locations of their grandparents. Teacher will lead a discussion about the patterns seen on the map. This will lead to push/pull factors and reasons why people migrate.


Pass out the Push-Pull Sheet #1



Students will find the names/locations of the places where their grand parents were born.

Have the students fill out the chart.




Lesson Development

Pass out the Immigration Data



Sheet for Nova Scotia and other Atlantic Provinces. Sheets #2-5

Pass out the Question Sheet for the graphs. Sheet #6

Have the students go to:

http://estat.statcan.ca/cgi-win/cnsmcgi.exe ** Password required

Have the students complete graphing the immigration data for the Atlantic Provinces. Make line graphs. (Use Excel if possible).

Have the students complete the graphing question sheet.



Conclusion

Teacher will pass out E.G Ravenstein’s Basic Laws of Migration and lead a decision on the information found on the graphs about migration in Atlantic Canada and how it relates to Ravenstein’s Basic Laws. Sheet #7


Students will contribute their observations. Students will review the handout ‘




Lesson Extension:


Include suggestions for extending this lesson into a follow-up lesson, homework assignment or culminating activity.

  • Have the students look and analyze the data sheet title and answer the questions found on the sheet.

  • Have students work in small groups and create a poster that visualizes the attractions of living Atlantic Canada today. Answer the questions of why people would have immigrated to Atlantic Canada.

  • Create a research project using data from Statistics Canada on out-migration in Atlantic Canada during the twentieth century.

  • Using the white board do a brainstorming activity discussing possible trends in population patterns that might appear in Atlantic Canada in the next decade.

  • Using a world map, pins, and coloured strings, connect the place names in the Atlantic Canada to their place of origin, e.g., new Glasgow-Glasgow, Scotland.

  • In groups create charts in order to compare and contrast the location of Acadian settlements (or other settlements) pre and post expulsion by examining the following factors: locations, physical landscape, economic activity, political, and social status (majority to minority).

  • Explain why the following acres are thinly settled:

-Interior of New Brunswick

-Interior of Newfoundland and Labrador

-Highlands of Cape Breton


  • Examine population tables and explain why population growth in Atlantic regions has been slower than other regions of Canada.

  • Explore migration patterns in Atlantic Canada of various groups.

  • Discuss the relevance of the following statement; “Many Atlantic Canadians today can trace their ancestry to those who came to this region as refugees.”

  • Use a visual organizer to outline factors influencing out-migration from Atlantic Canada within a selected time period.



Assessment of Student Learning:


Have the students satisfactorily complete the following:

  • Assess the push/pull activity.

  • Evaluate one or more of the line graphs.

  • Evaluate the answers for the line graphs.

  • Assess students contributions Ravenstein’s Basic Laws of Migration.



Further Reading:


Use your textbook and www.statcan.ca. There are many other online sources that deal with the topic of human migration. Go to http://www.nationalgeographic.com and use their search and type in “Human Migration”.

Human Migration in Atlantic Canada: Push and Pull Factors

Activity Sheet #1

Human migration can be studied by looking at the factors that cause people to move. These factors are called Push and Pull factors. Push means what conditions exist where you live that would cause you to leave. Pull factors refer to those influences that exist elsewhere that would draw you or cause you to move there. Push and pull factors fall into four main groups: physical. economic social, and political. Make a copy of the table below, and place two different items from the following list in each of the categories:



  • Freedom of speech

  • Poverty

  • Harsh climate

  • Fertile soils

  • Heavy taxes

  • Promotion

  • Good wages

  • Marriage

  • Political asylum

  • Persecution

  • Discrimination

  • Bereavement

  • Planning Decision

  • Natural Disaster

  • Attractive Climate

  • Relatives and friends






Push

Pull

Physical










Economic










Social










Political










Now try to add further examples of your own to the table to complete a thorough classification of push and pull factors.


Human Migration in Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia-International Migrants



(Table 051-0011)

Activity Sheet #2


Sex

Both Sexes

Males

Females

1974

3064

1516

1548

1975

2342

1177

1
Instructions:

  1. Open up Excel spreadsheet and enter the Both Sexes Data for each even year. 1974, 2976, 1978, to 2002, 2004.

  2. Use the “Chart Wizard”, located on the Excel tool bar to create a line graph displaying the data for Prince Edward Island -International Migrants.

  3. Be sure to label the X and Y-axis as well as, creating a title for your graph.

  4. Key points to remember about using Excel:

  • Place a colon or semi-colon in from of the year. I.e.: 1978 this allows the graphing program to read the date as a year instead of a mathematical number.

  • Remove any commas that separate the thousands and hundreds places. I.e.: change 1,548 to 1548

5. Analyze your graph, get question sheet

for your graph and answer the questions.



165

1976

2004

1006

998

1977

1854

954

900

1978

1219

601

618

1979

967

451

516

1980

1885

1004

881

1981

1271

615

656

1982

1470

752

718

1983

937

461

476

1984

939

446

493

1985

1049

522

527

1986

974

505

469

1987

1170

611

559

1988

1212

621

591

1989

1452

771

681

1990

1454

757

697

1991

1542

807

735

1992

1927

980

947

1993

2599

1297

1302

1994

3084

1607

1477

1995

3726

1932

1794

1996

3397

1785

1612

1997

3111

1649

1462

1998

2590

1333

1257

1999

1624

819

805

2000

1674

860

814

2001

1761

886

875

2002

1615

817

798

2003

1257

642

615

2004

1697

842

855

Source: Statistics Canada
Human Migration in Atlantic Canada: Prince Edward Island-International Migrants, (Table 051-0011)

Activity Sheet #3



Sex

Both Sexes

Males

Females

1974

377

176

201

1975

284

134

150

1976

222

115

1
Instructions:

  1. Open up Excel spreadsheet and enter the Both Sexes data for each even year. 1974, 2976, 1978, to 2002, 2004.

  2. Use the “Chart Wizard”, located on the Excel tool bar to create a line graph displaying the data for Prince Edward Island -International Migrants.

  3. Be sure to label the X and Y-axis as well as, creating a title for your graph.

  4. Key points to remember about using Excel:

  • Place a colon or semi-colon in from of the year. Ie: 1978 this allows the graphing program to read the date as a year instead of a mathematical number.

  • Remove any commas that separate the thousands and hundreds places. I.e.: change 1,548 to 1548

5. Analyze your graph, get question sheet

for your graph and answer the questions.


07

1977

200

100

100

1978

174

76

98

1979

168

79

89

1980

300

152

148

1981

146

75

71

1982

148

75

73

1983

139

61

78

1984

103

41

62

1985

116

58

58

1986

129

68

61

1987

165

85

80

1988

165

84

81

1989

139

67

72

1990

181

88

93

1991

149

74

75

1992

165

79

86

1993

161

76

85

1994

139

66

73

1995

200

106

94

1996

127

61

66

1997

185

96

89

1998

123

64

59

1999

125

64

61

2000

142

71

71

2001

190

101

89

2002

145

75

70

2003

89

43

46

2004

262

125

137

Source: Statistics Canada

Human Migration in Atlantic Canada: New Brunswick-International Migrants, (Table 051-0011)



Activity Sheet #4



Sex

Both Sexes

Males

Females

1974

2279

1133

1
Instructions:

  1. Open up Excel spreadsheet and enter the Both Sexes data for each even year. 1974, 2976, 1978, to 2002, 2004.

  2. Use the “Chart Wizard”, located on the Excel tool bar to create a line graph displaying the data for Prince Edward Island -International Migrants.

  3. Be sure to label the X and Y-axis as well as, creating a title for your graph.

  4. Key points to remember about using Excel:

  • Place a colon or semi-colon in from of the year. I.e.: 1978 this allows the graphing program to read the date as a year instead of a mathematical number.

  • Remove any commas that separate the thousands and hundreds places. I.e.: change 1,548 to 1548

5. Analyze your graph, get question sheet

for your graph and answer the questions.



146

1975

1998

1021

977

1976

2241

1134

1107

1977

1425

701

724

1978

751

358

393

1979

689

336

353

1980

1530

748

782

1981

963

463

500

1982

883

430

453

1983

662

314

348

1984

558

263

295

1985

596

298

298

1986

625

337

288

1987

678

359

319

1988

580

279

301

1989

732

423

309

1990

954

496

458

1991

738

384

354

1992

804

400

404

1993

748

357

391

1994

589

267

322

1995

676

332

344

1996

646

319

327

1997

673

344

329

1998

717

361

356

1999

752

362

390

2000

609

306

303

2001

883

438

445

2002

768

371

397

2003

648

323

325

2004

753

389

364

Source: Statistics Canada

Human Migration in Atlantic Canada: Newfoundland & Labrador-International Migrants, 1975 to 2004 (Table 051-0011)



Activity Sheet #5


Sex

Both Sexes

Males

Females

1974

1128

610

5
Instructions:

  1. Open up Excel spreadsheet and enter the Both Sexes data for each even year. 1974, 2976, 1978, to 2002, 2004.

  2. Use the “Chart Wizard”, located on the Excel tool bar to create a line graph displaying the data for Prince Edward Island -International Migrants.

  3. Be sure to label the X and Y-axis as well as, creating a title for your graph.

  4. Key points to remember about using Excel:

  • Place a colon or semi-colon in from of the year. I.e.: 1978 this allows the graphing program to read the date as a year instead of a mathematical number.

  • Remove any commas that separate the thousands and hundreds places. I.e.: change 1,548 to 1548

5. Analyze your graph, get question sheet

for your graph and answer the questions.



18

1975

995

505

490

1976

1013

527

486

1977

648

316

332

1978

466

251

215

1979

377

198

179

1980

681

372

309

1981

483

239

244

1982

424

219

205

1983

356

162

194

1984

311

166

145

1985

300

159

141

1986

298

144

154

1987

355

187

168

1988

434

215

219

1989

431

225

206

1990

483

258

225

1991

614

346

268

1992

704

372

332

1993

806

425

381

1994

704

364

340

1995

615

336

279

1996

557

306

251

1997

479

252

227

1998

411

213

198

1999

368

198

170

2000

425

225

200

2001

453

226

227

2002

422

203

219

2003

313

174

139

2004

549

301

248

Source: Statistics Canada


Human Migration in Atlantic Canada: Questions

Activity Sheet #6

Graph #1


  1. Write the title of the graph: _________________________________________________.

  2. Describe the pattern seen (demonstrated) on the graph.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. Are there any anomalies? If so, suggest possible reasons for this.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. Predict the trend for the next ten years.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Graph #2


1. Write the title of the graph: ______________________________________________________________

2. Describe the pattern seen (demonstrated) on the graph.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. Are there any anomalies? If so, suggest possible reasons for this.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4. Predict the trend for the next ten years.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Graph #3


  1. Write the title of the graph: ___________________________________________________________

  2. Describe the pattern seen (demonstrated) on the graph.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. Are there any anomalies? If so, suggest possible reasons for this.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. Predict the trend for the next ten years.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Graph #4


1. Write the title of the graph: ______________________________________________________________

2. Describe the pattern seen (demonstrated) on the graph.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. Are there any anomalies? If so, suggest possible reasons for this.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4. Predict the trend for the next ten years.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Human Migration in Atlantic Canada: E.G Ravenstein’s Basic Laws of Migration
Activity Sheet #7
E.G. Ravenstein was a pioneer in the field of human migration. He lived in the late 19th century. From his research and studies he concluded that there were basic laws of migration. The following are the basic laws of migration suggested by E.G. Ravenstein in the late 19th century.

Read and discuss each law as presented by E.G Ravenstein:




  • Most migrants travel short distances and with increasing distance the numbers of migrants decrease.

  • Most migration movements produce a compensation counter-movement.

  • Migration occurs in stages and with a wave-like motion.

  • The major direction of migration is from agricultural area to centres of industry and commerce.

  • Large towns grow more by migration than by natural increase.

  • Migration increases in volume as industries and commerce develop and transport improves.

  • Most migrants are adults, and families rarely migrate outside their country of birth.

  • Women are more migratory than men within their country of birth, but men more frequently venture beyond it.

  • Town dwellers are less migratory that country dwellers.


Teacher Reference:

http://www.csiss.org/classics/content/90

Ernest George Ravenstein: The Laws of Migration, 1885.


By John Corbett


Canadian Council for Geographic Education (www.ccge.org)

Statistics Canada (www.statcan.ca)


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