Muse 250 Table Of Contents Name/Group Page



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Brass Artists

MUSE 250


Table Of Contents

Name/Group Page

Canadian Brass …………………………………………………………………………………………….3

Christopher Martin……………………………………………………………………………………….5

Chuck Mangione……………………………………………………………………………………………8

Curtis Fuller………………………………………………………………………………………………..10

Genghis Barbie……………………………………………………………………………………………13

Glenn Miller………………………………………………………………………………………………...17

In the Mood…………………………………………………………………………………………………21

J.J. Johnson………………………………………………………………………………………………….23

Maynard Ferguson……………………………………………………………………………………...26

Philip Farkas……………………………………………………………………………………………….29

Philip Jones Brass Ensemble………………………………………………………………………..33

Stiletto Brass………………………………………………………………………………………………37

Tommy Johnson………………………………………………………………………………………….42

Wynton Marsalis…………………………………………………………………………………………48

Brass Artist Project

Canadian Brass

Canadian Brass is a brass quintet, which was originally formed in 1970 by Chuck Daellenbach and Gene Watts. The members of Canadian Brass consist of founding member Chuck Daellenbach (tuba), Christopher Coletti and Caleb Hudson (trumpets), Achilles Liarmakopoulos (trombone) and Bernhard Scully (horn). Though, brass quintets were not new at the time, Canadian Brass was the first to achieve a successful career has achieved over the last 40 something years. Their concerts usually have a wide range of repertoire from trademark Baroque to Dixieland tunes to new compositions. Their presentation of their music also has a wide range. They present music in ways such as formal classical presentations to music with dialogue and theatrical effects.

The Canadian Brass ensemble has produced over 130 albums and has toured all over the world. They were the first brass ensemble from the West to perform in the People’s Republic of China as well as the first brass ensemble to take the stage in Carnegie Hall. The varied Canadian Brass repertoire features brass standards as well as a ranging library of original arrangements. These include the works from the Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical eras, marches, holiday tunes, ragtime, Dixieland, Latin, Jazz, Big band, Broadway and Christian music, as well as pop songs.

Music performed by the Canadian Brass ensemble can be found on youtube, itunes, as well as their many albums. Below are some samples of some of their most popular pieces.

Canon in D: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ut_vq0eN1WA

Fugue in g minor, Bach: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qvc4955x_W8

Flight of the Bumblebee: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZO5KTJTwhE

Bad Romance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Cy3tjg1tVw

Beale Street Blues: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXMLuiPBIao

The Canadian Brass, even with all of their touring around the world, the members will often teach master classes and are happy to teach young students and audiences. They also have outreach programs through their involvement at various schools including the Eastman School of Music as well as being exclusive artists for Conn-Selmer Musical Instruments.

Sources


Canadian Brass Website: http://www.canadianbrass.com/

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/

iTunes

Christopher Martin


Brass Artist Research Project

Christopher Martin is the principal trumpet of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra since 2005. Prior to that, he served as principal trumpet of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and associate principal trumpet of the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra. He studied under Barbara Butler and Charles Geyer, esteemed trumpet pedagogues, at the Eastman School of Music, earning a BM with performer’s certificate. He has been on faculty at Northwestern University (Chicago Symphony Orchestra).

He grew up in Marietta, Georgia alongside his brother Michael Martin, another famed trumpet player. Michael Martin is currently serves as Third/Utility Trumpet of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He also studied under Barbara Butler and Charles Geyer at Northwestern University following their tenure at Eastman (Boston Symphony Orchestra). In both brothers’ younger years, they participated in Drum Corps International. Michael Martin played and now works with the Cavaliers, and Chris Martin played with the Spirit of Atlanta.

Christopher Martin’s career is primarily cited in the orchestral world; however, he does perform as a soloist occasionally with major orchestras. Most notably, he performed as a soloist with the National Symphony Orchestra under the composer John Williams for the soundtrack for the major motion picture, Lincoln on “With Malice Toward None” (Williams). Another notable experience of Chris Martin’s solo career was his performance of the premier of “A Tribute to Adolph ‘Bud’ Herseth” written by Jim Stevenson at the International Trumpet Guild Conference in 2013. Most recently, he performed the world premier of “Heimdall’s Trumpet,” a concerto commissioned for him in 2012 (Chicago Symphony Orchestra).

Since Mr. Martin’s solo career is limited, there are limited recordings that feature him primarily; however, there are numerous recordings that feature the brass section of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. These include “Chicago Symphony Orchestra Brass Live” from 2011 and “Prokofiev: Suite from Romeo and Juliet” from 2014. In addition to these, the “Gabrielli – National Brass Ensemble” recording from 2015 is a fantastic demonstration of extraordinary brass playing that includes Christopher Martin. Lastly, the “Lincoln” soundtrack from 2012 best exemplifies the amazing sound that Mr. Martin holds (Chicago Symphony Orchestra).

The most fascinating and very recent news regarding Chris Martin was released only days ago. According to Last Row Music, Chris will be taking a leave of absence from his position in Chicago to temporarily fill the first chair of the New York Philharmonic. In a personal conversation with Ethan Bensdorf, the acting associate principal trumpet in New York, Chris was rumored to have been moving from Chicago to New York. If he moves, he will be one of two trumpet players ever to be a member of the CSO and the New York Philharmonic. The other is Phil Smith (Last Row Music).

In my personal time spent listening to Chris’s playing as a soloist and an orchestral principal player, I have deduced that he is my model for sound. Particularly in his solo work, his vibrato and and sweet cornet-like tone have set him apart from hundreds of other candidates for his job. In addition to his sound, his ease in playing, a common trait among students of Barbara Butler and Charles Geyer, distinguish him as a true master of his instrument.

Discography is listed in the top paragraph of page 2.
Works Cited

"| Boston Symphony Orchestra | Bso.org." | Boston Symphony Orchestra | Bso.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.


"Brass Arranger, Brass Caption Head." Cavaliers Drum and Bugle Corps. The Cavaliers Drum

and Bugle Corps, n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.


"Chicago Principal Trumpet to Take Leave of Absence." Last Row Music. N.p., 21 Apr. 2016. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.
"CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: TRUMPET." Chicago Symphony Orchestra. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2016.
Williams, John. WILLIAMS, J.: Lincoln (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) (Chicago Symphony Chorus and Orchestra, J. Williams). Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Naxos Digital Services US Inc., 2013. CD.
Chuck Mangione

For over five decades, the music of Chuck Mangione has provided energy and joy to music lovers across the world. Chuck Mangione is an American flugelhorn player, trumpeter, and composer. Chuck Mangione achieved international success in 1977 with his most popular piece “Feels So Good”. He has released thirty more albums since 1960.

Chuck Mangione was born on November 29, 1940 in Rochester, New York. Both he and his brother Gaspare Mangione started music at a very young age. Chuck Mangione attended Eastman School of Music from 1958-1963, and afterwards he joined Art Blakey’s Jazz ensemble where he played trumpet. Later, he served as director of the Eastman Jazz ensemble from 1968-1972. This teaching position led to Chuck Mangione earning a major recording contract with Mercury records. He also earned a Grammy nomination during his time with the Eastman Jazz ensemble.

Chuck Mangione won his first Grammy Award in 1977 in the Best Instrumental Category. During this time, Mangione worked closely with saxophonist Gerry Niewood. The two recorded many albums together including the Grammy winning album “Feels So Good”. His music was also used at the 1976 summer Olympics in Montreal, Quebec and at the 1980 winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York. He preformed live at both closing ceremonies for the 1976 and 1980 Olympic games.

Chuck Mangione won his second Grammy in 1979 for his soundtrack on the film The Children of Sanchez. The Grammy was won in the Best Pop instrumental performance category. Mangione continued to compose for other movie soundtracks in the future.

The 1980’s were a big time for Chuck Mangione. He signed with Columbia records and released many more albums. He was also busy with many interviews and performances during these years. In 1989, Chuck Mangione released two albums. Following these releases and playing 25 years of one-night events around the world, Chuck Mangione stopped playing music.

Chuck Mangione disappeared form the music industry for many years. It was not until 1994 that he resurfaced with a new drive and passion for music. Many attribute the death of Dizzy Gillespie to his resurface in the music industry. During 1994, Chuck Mangione recorded two new albums and also numerous nightclub performances.

Chuck Mangione is a Jazz legend as well as a Grammy winner who changed the landscape of Jazz in the 1970’s and 1980’s. In 2012, Chuck Mangione was inducted into the Rochester Music Hall of Fame. His dedication to Jazz, music education, and music in general shaped the way a whole generation listed to Jazz music.

Resource list and Discography
http://www.chuckmangione.com

Recording can be found on his website as well as tour dates



Miller, Frederic P., Agnes F. Vandome, and John McBrewster. Chuck Mangione. VDM, 2010. Print.

Curtis Fuller: A brief biography and selected Discography

Curtis Fuller is an American Jazz Trombonist. When looking at his discography it is readily apparent that he is the real deal. Curtis Fuller has worked with pretty much all of the Jazz greats. He’s worked with Miles Davis, Cannonball Adderley, John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter, Lee Morgan, Paul Chambers, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie, and was the sixth member of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. He is famed for his graceful and virtuosic style of playing. He took what could be an awkward instrument and made it sound very fluid. His signature move on trombone were octave jumps in his solos and his overall virtuosity.

Curtis Fuller was born on December 15th, 1934 in Detroit. Fuller’s parents died while he was still very young so Fuller was raised in an orphanage. Fuller was raise in the orphanage for ten years. Fuller’s interest in Jazz is credited to when a nun to him to see Illinois Jacquet’s band which featured JJ Johnson on the Trombone. While going to school Fuller became friends with the legendary bass player Paul Chambers. High School was when Fuller began to study music. Fuller started playing the baritone in High School but eventually made the fateful switch to trombone at the age of 16. After High School Fuller played in one of the Army Bands. This was were Fuller would really develop as a musician. While in the army band Fuller met and played alongside Cannonball Adderley. Fuller played in the Army for 2 years and then returned to Detroit. After returning to Detroit Fuller played in the Yusef Lateef Quintet before the quintet moved to New York in 1957 and recorded several records.

After the move to New York Fuller seemed to never stop being busy. It was at this time that Fuller started to play with Miles Davis. An executive from Blue Note Records saw Fuller performing with Miles Davis and then signed him as a Blue Note artist. Following this Fuller played on Blue Train by John Coltrane, which is likely Fuller’s most listened to work. In 1961 Curtis Fuller turned Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers into a sextet and created what many consider to be one of the most exciting bands of the Hard Bop genre. Fuller played with the Jazz Messengers for four years until 1965.

In 1968 Fuller toured throughout Europe with Dizzy Gillespie. After returning to America Fuller did several sessions in New York. In the 1970s fuller experimented quite a bit. Fuller played in a band which played hard bop arrangements with electronic instruments. Fuller headed the group along with guitar player Bill Washer and bassist Stanley Clarke. Following this period of experimentation Fuller toured with Count Basie. He toured with Count Basie from 1975-1977. Fuller has done many projects since then and has worked with many of the great jazz artists.

In more recent years Curtis Fuller has turn more towards education and is an in demand clinician. Curtis Fuller has done clinics at many prestigious universities. Curtis Fuller also holds an honorary Doctorate from Berklee College of Music.

Selected Discography



Blues-ette, Savoy, 1956

Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, Ugetsu, Riverside/OJC, 1963

Crankin', MRL, 1973

The Jazztet, Real Time, Contemporary, 1986

Keep It Simple, Savant, 2003
Reference list

"Curtis Fuller." : The Hard Bop Homepage. Web. 24 Apr. 2016.

"NEA Jazz Masters." Home. Web. 24 Apr. 2016.

“The Opener” Curtis Fuller. Blue Note, 1957. CD.

Brass Artist Research Project

This all female French horn quartet that began in 2010, considers themselves the “most innovative and energizing chamber ensemble of its generation.” The members of Genghis Barbie (Freedom Barbie, Cosmic Barbie, Velvet Barbie and Attila the Horn) all vowed that every performance will be “distinctive, interactive, and personal.”

The name Genghis Barbie came from, as member Danielle Kuhlmann (Velvet Barbie) says, from one of her dad’s friend’s daughter who just learned about Genghis Kahn in school and played with Barbie since she was about five years old. This little girl drew up a comic strip for school called Genghis Barbie and Kuhlmann told all her friends that if she was to start a band she would call it Genghis Barbie. When the group came up with the idea of the horn quartet they had a couple of names, some “that were slightly more inappropriate” than others, so they just decided to stick with Genghis Barbie.

Genghis Barbie was actually formed at one of the quartet member’s bachelorette party. These women had already been friends and just happened to all do the same thing, play French horn. At the time they were all freelancers, but the idea just popped into their heads to start a horn quartet and play pop music that they loved.

Before the group was formed each individual had their own work that they were previously devoted. Danielle Kuhlmann, aka Velvet Barbie, volunteered for the group Culture in Harmony, a New York based NGO that promotes cultural diplomacy through music. Kuhlmann also volunteered to teach music at the Afghanistan National Institute of Music. Rachel Drehmann, aka Attila the Horn, performs a series of baroque horn concertos, Banda de Los Muertos, the Chamber Orchestra of New York, and was also a member of the indie rock band A Whisper In The Noise. Drehmann also performed, as a soloist, with the Brooklyn Sumphony Orchestra, as well as the American Symphony Orchestra, Albany Symphony, Princeton Symphony, Northeast Pennsylvania Philharmonic, The Knights, and Metropolis Ensemble and numerous Broadway shows. Alana Vegter, aka Freedom Barbie, played with The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, The New York Philharmonic, The Orchestra of St. Luke’s, The Knights Chamber Orchestra, International Contemporary Ensemble, and City Music Cleveland. Vegter has also performed in many orchestral and chamber music settings with the Spoleto Festival USA, Pacific Music Festival, Chamber Music Northwest, Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Bay Chamber Concerts, The Verbier Festival Orchestra, The Julliard Orchestra, and The Aspen Music Festival. Then there is Leelanee Sterrett, aka Cosmic Barbie, who is third horn in the New York Philharmonic, and is a member of the New Haven Symphony, La Crosse and Fox Valley Symphony Orchestras.

Genghis Barbie performs “arrangements of pop music from the 60’s, 70’s, 80’s, 90’s, 00’s and today, contemporary commissions, and classical works.” This group takes pieces that they enjoy and rearranges the song into a quartet that could be played by horns. Some of the time a piece does not work out because it does not sound right between the four horns, but most of the time the piece comes out pretty successfully. When rearranging the piece, the group tries and to give each individual the parts of the song that they like the most, but if that cannot happen then they usually get first choice on the next piece.

The group finds it absolutely “important that people see something out of the box and people doing something they love.” The goal of the group is to inspire other people to find what they love to do because that is why Genghis Barbie does what they do. They say, “It’s not necessarily that what we are doing is unique or different, it’s that we care about what we do.” This is because Genghis Barbie likes to have fun with each performance and wants the audience to react however they want to; they are going to continue to do what they do and have a good time with it and hope that their audience does too.

Genghis Barbie just recently came out with a new CD making that a total of four in the past couple of years. These recordings include “Genghis Barbie’s Debut,” “Genghis Barbie- Home for the Holidays,” “Genghis Barbie- Songs for Noa,” and “Genghis Barbie- Amp It Up!”

Works Cited

Yeh, Molly. “Q&A With Genghis Barbie.” The Juilliard Journal. October (2012). Print.



Genghis Barbie. www.genghisbarbie.com. 2012. Web. 23 November 2014.

Glenn Miller

Glenn Miller, an American, was born in Clarinda, Iowa, on March 1, 1904. Glenn grew up playing the rather unusual mandolin, but eventually he got his hands on a brass instrument and stuck with it. His family whisked him away to many different cities throughout his schooling life. Glenn eventually found himself at Fort Morgan, Colorado playing in the band there. He graduated high school in 1921 and quickly joined the Boyd Senter’s orchestra afterwards. After two years of the professional musician’s life, he quit to go to college at the University of Colorado.

College seemed to not suite Miller, though, and dropped out after a year of attendance to return to the life of a musician. He soon moved out to Los Angeles where he hopped into Ben Pollack’s band. After awhile, he decided to head on again with another move; this time to New York City. For quite a few years, he freelanced as a trombonist and arranger in the Big Apple. In 1934, he worked as a director for a couple different bands including Tommy Dorsey’s band as well as the American orchestra for a British bandleader Ray Noble. After a few years of soul searching, trial and error, and a whole lot of instrumentalists later, Glenn got his own band off the ground; the Glenn Miller Orchestra.

His band was struggling to gain popularity until he landed some gigs at the Glen Island Casino in New Rochelle, New York. This opportunity, which occurred in 1939, gave the Miller name its fame. These gigs were broadcast on the radio, spreading their sound far and wide. Later that year, Glenn composed his first big hit named “Wishing (Will Make it So)” which put him even farther up the popularity scale. One of the most famous of his ballades, “Moonlight Serenade,” was published soon afterwards gaining him top position in the charts. Miller’s Orchestra soon became the most beloved swing band in America with the addition of popular hits like “In the Mood,” “Pennsylvania 6-5000,” and “Tuxedo Junction.” All of these were released in 1940 and can be found on such recordings such as “Glenn Miller’s Original Recordings; Plays selections from the Glenn Miller Story and Other Hits.”

In the next few years he produced a couple of films featuring some of his new hits including Sun Valley Serenade in 1941, and Orchestra Wives in 1942. Sun Valley Serenade featured his song “Chattanooga Choo Choo.” After producing his second film, Orchestra Wives, he was inducted into the U.S. Army to participate in the Second World War. He later transferred into the Army Air Force and became part of the Army Air Force Band, giving him the chance to avoid most of the dangers of war.

The world mysteriously lost the “King of Jazz” in 1944 when he received word that he was to be moved to the newly liberated city of Paris for a performance. He boarded a plane leaving ahead of the others to make early preparations. Somewhere between England, the station just prior, and France, his plane disappeared. No one to this day knows what happened to the plane; whether it crashed, was shot down, or any other number of tragedies. His body was never recovered, leaving behind his wife and two children. His band did not disband after his death, and kept playing for a couple months after his disappearance. It was later revived to honor the life and works of Glenn and still tours today.

Glenn Miller left the world with an amazing legacy. He even had a film produced about his story in 1954 called The Glenn Miller Story! Some of the most famous and popular big band jazz charts even in the modern age were composed by Miller. No big band jazz swing dance would be complete without a blaring, upbeat “In the Mood,” or the classy and fun “Pennsylvania 6-5000.” He paved the way for many other big band jazz groups, and helped spur the uprising of the swing era and venue. Overall, America, and the world, was blessed by the brilliant ideas of the man named Glenn Miller.


A few links to some Glenn Miller;

In The Mood: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPXwkWVEIIw

Moonlight Serenade: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n92ATE3IgIs

Chattanooga Choo Choo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XQybKMXL-k

A String of Pearls: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Qq2AV7Wx5w

Tuxedo Junction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBTYcqtaOjg&index=5&list=RD8Qq2AV7Wx5w

Pennsylvania 6-5000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_muFwwTSMs&list=RD8Qq2AV7Wx5w&index=7

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8b/glenn_miller_band.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glenn_Miller_Orchestra

http://ww2nation.com/event/music-the-glenn-miller-orchestra-at-the-bridgewater-hall-manchester/


Citation


Biography.com Editors. "Glenn Miller." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.
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