November 2005 Review Period: July 1, 2002 through June 30, 2005 Table of Contents



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ACADMEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW

Self Study Report

School of Social Work

College of Health and Human Sciences

Georgia State University

November 2005



Review Period: July 1, 2002 through June 30, 2005

Table of Contents



Section Page


Section A: Unit Assessment of Strengths and Weaknesses 5


Section B: Historical and Current Contexts 11
Section C: Progress Toward Goals and Objectives 15
Section D: Curricula Quality 18
Section E: Student Quality 23
Section F: Faculty Quality 25
Section G: Resource Adequacy 26
Section H: Goals and Objectives 27
Appendices 30
Tables 232

List of Appendices/Tables




Appendix/Table Page
Appendix B1: Rationale for Choices of Peer Programs 30

Appendix B1a: Peer Institutional Data 31


Appendix B2: School of Social Work Organizational Chart 32
Appendix B3: School of Social Work Constitution and By-laws 33
Appendix B4: School of Social Work Current Faculty Roster 41
Appendix B5: Summary Table of Faculty Roster 42
Appendix C1: School of Social Work Five Year Action Plan, 1999 43
Appendix D1: Learning Outcome Statements and Assessment Plan 48
Appendix D2: Designated Writing Intensive Course Syllabus 57
Appendix D3: Social Work Degree Requirements 66
Appendix D4: Dept.Course Offerings by Year, Term Level, # of Sections, 70

# of Students, and Average # of Students, 2003-2005


Appendix D5a: Faculty Survey Comparison Report 82
Appendix D5b: Undergraduate Student Survey Comparison Report 90
Appendix D5c: Undergraduate Alumni Survey Comparison Report 95
Appendix D5d: Graduate Student Survey Comparison Report 100
Appendix D5e: Graduate Alumni Survey Comparison Report 105
Appendix D6: Undergraduate and Graduate Advisement Procedures 110
Appendix F1: Definition and Criteria for Graduate Faculty 113
Appendix F2: List of Graduate Faculty 117
Appendix F3: School of Social Work Current Full Time Faculty Vitas 118
Appendix F4: Unit Faculty Involvement in Self Study 217
Appendix G1: Student/Faculty Ratios, FY 2003-2005 218
Appendix G2: Library Resources 219
Appendix H1: School of Social Work Strategic Plan, May 2003 224
Appendix H2: Proposal for a Center for Collaborative Social Work 225
Table B1: Faculty Distribution by Numbers for FY 2003-2005 231
Table B2: Faculty Productivity for FY 2003-2005 233
Table B3: Program Types by Majors and Concentration and 236

Unduplicated Number (Headcount) of Major Students and

Degrees Conferred FY 2003 – 2005

Table B4a: 2003 Credit Hours Taught by Department Faculty by 236

Level and Faculty Type




Table B4b: 2004 Credit Hour Generation by Level and Faculty Type 237




Table B4c: 2005 Credit Hour Generation by Level and Faculty Type 237

Table E1: Mean Standardized Graduate Admission Test Scores and GPAs 238

for 2003-2005

Table E2: Selection Ratio of Applicant/Accepted Graduate Students 238

for 2003-2005



ACADMEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW

Self Study Report

School of Social Work

College of Health and Human Sciences

Georgia State University

November 2005



Review Period: July 1, 2002 through June 30, 2005

Section A: Unit Assessment of Strengths and Weaknesses

1. Quality of instruction, research, and service associated with the programs


Since 1998, the School of Social Work at Georgia State University has undergone three self-studies and five external site visits conducted by the most notable and influential social work scholars and educators under the auspices of the Council on Social Work Education. These visits concluded in 2004 with a comprehensive School of Social Work review that culminated in reaffirmation of accreditation through 2012. The basis for this decision was the result of a complete assessment of all aspects of the School, from the quality of our resources and support through the excellence of our curricula, faculty, students, and community relationships. In the Commission’s final report, they stated that the School of Social Work at Georgia State University “could serve as a model for social work education.” In that same report, they cited the many reasons for this conclusion. Many of those reasons comprise the core of this self study.
The faculty of the School of Social Work are highly effective teachers. In the area of instruction, faculty course evaluations are well above the mid-point of the rating form. Most faculty make use of web-based technology. Students’ responses as noted in Appendix D5b/d reflect the perspective on their quality of the learning experience as well as the faculty’s commitment to their learning through knowledge of their subject and accessibility to them. The School of Social Work has also developed a study abroad program in which School of Social Work students and faculty travel to the United Kingdom to examine social work service delivery in Liverpool and at the University of Bradford.
All tenured and tenure track faculty are engaged in scholarship and have active research agendas. The most relevant indicator of this assessment is that every faculty who has been eligible for tenure and promotion in the last decade has achieved it. The School and College, as well as the University have high standards for tenure and promotion and over the last six years, 5 social work faculty members have been tenured and promoted. Conversely, in two situations where scholarly efforts were inadequate, in large measure because the faculty members were hired prior to completion of their dissertation, contracts were not renewed at pre-tenure review. Since the previous Academic Program Review and during the three year review period, faculty have published articles in several of the most competitive journals in Social Work, including, the Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, Social Work, the Journal of Social Work Education, Research on Social Work Practice, Administration in Social Work, and the Journal of Community Practice. In addition, faculty has published in other interdisciplinary journals such as Cornell Law Review and the Journal of Law and Social Work. Also, faculty have produced 42 other scholarly works and presented 43 papers at regional, state, national, and international conferences.
In addition to scholarly publications, the faculty has been highly successful in obtaining external grants and contracts for both research and service. As will be noted elsewhere, the faculty has received approximately $3 million in grants and contracts during the review period. About half of these dollars were for research and program evaluation in such areas as Welfare to Work Substance Abuse Treatment, Interstate Adoptions of Special Needs Children, Grandparents Raising Grandchildren, Case management for Non-Custodial Fathers, and Utilization of the Earned Income Tax Credit. The other half of these dollars were for training, service, and program development in such areas as Child Welfare Worker Capacity Building (Title IV E Child Welfare Training Grant) and Gero-Enriched Curriculum (Hartford Foundation). In September 2005, the School was awarded a $1.5 million grant to partner with other Social Work Programs and organizations across the state to provide Professional Development to experienced workers within the Division of Family and Children Services. In brief, most of the social work faculty have or are participating in externally funded research or service with the average for all tenured/tenure track faculty during the review period at approximately $90,000.
Social Work faculty provides continuing service to the University, community, and the profession. Faculty hold and/or held leadership positions in community organizations and state and national professional associations from state licensure boards and the National Association of Social Workers to Chairs of national annual professional meetings and national planning committees. In addition, faculty members have been influential in development of social policy in the state, including contributions to the development and enactment of state law (Child Endangerment SB 467 and Predatory Lending Law HB 1361).
2. Centrality of the programs to the University: Alignment with and contributions to

achieving the mission and goals of Georgia State University


The degree programs of the School of Social Work are consistent with achieving the mission and goals of Georgia State University. The University’s mission is to be engaged with the larger community across all units of the institution. As an urban research university with strong disciplinary-based departments and a wide array of problem-oriented interdisciplinary programs, the goal of the university is to develop, transmit, and utilize knowledge in order to provide access to quality education for diverse groups of students, to educate leaders for the State of Georgia and the nation, and to prepare citizens for lifelong learning in a global society.
Specifically, the 2005 University’s Strategic Plan states that the University is committed to:


  • Undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs that contribute to the economic, educational, social, professional and cultural vitality of the city, state and region.




  • Enhancement of scholarship of the disciplinary and interdisciplinary research programs, centers and institutes, that have achieved, or demonstrated promise to achieve national and international recognition




  • Graduate students who are proficient in their discipline as trained and talented professionals who have interpersonal skills and competence to lead in a global society

The mission of the School of Social Work is to contribute to the building of healthy communities that maximize human potential and promote social and economic justice through excellence and distinctiveness in teaching and learning, research and scholarship, service and outreach. The mission of the BSW Program is to prepare entry-level, generalist social workers to assume responsibility for a range of services that deal with the problems experienced by people in a multicultural society. The mission of the MSW Program is to prepare students in advanced social work practice for leadership roles in the effort to solve, in partnerships with others, the existing and developing challenges that confront communities in the United States and internationally.


The School of Social Work is located within the College of Health and Human Sciences. The other units in the college include the: Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing, School of Health Professions comprised of the Divisions of Nutrition, Physical Therapy, and Respiratory Therapy, Department of Criminal Justice, and the Institute for Public Health. The college has a community outreach orientation with many of the units engaged in community collaborations that often include social work. The College’s stated mission is to engage in teaching, scholarly endeavors, and service activities that improve health and well-being and address social justice issues within a multi-cultural society.
Another indicator of the School’s centrality is its involvement in the Partnership in Urban Health Research. This initiative was funded as an area of focus by the University in 2004. As a result of this initiative, the School will be hiring a faculty member this year with from this interdisciplinary teaching and research opportunity. This initiative has prompted planning in the College of Health and Human Sciences on an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Urban Health. The response to these developments will be reflected in the Goals and Objectives in Section H.
3. Viability of programs: Degree to which the programs are viable with respect to

enrollments, graduates, and continuing availability of resources to support them.

The School of Social Work offers two degree programs; the Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) and the Masters of Social Work (MSW). Both programs are fully accredited through 2012 by the Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the accrediting body for all 450 BSW and 140 MSW programs in the nation. Accreditation is a rigorous process that included a self study and a multiple day site visit by a five member team of experienced social work educators. The Self-Study and the Site Visit Team analyze and evaluate every aspect of the School of Social Work including curriculum of both degree programs, faculty production, student admissions and quality, community involvement, program administration, and resources.

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