Ordeal By Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction Part 1: The Coming of War



Download 55.41 Kb.
Date conversion10.08.2017
Size55.41 Kb.
Outline:

Ordeal By Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction Part 1: The Coming of War

  1. Chapter 1: American Modernization, 1800-1860

    1. Changes to the Economy (5)

      1. Changes in Transportation

      2. Increased Food Production

      3. American System of Manufactures

    2. Causes of American Modernization (12)

    3. The Modernizing Ethos (Yankee/Puritan/Protestant Work Ethic) (14)

    4. Modernization and Reform (16)

      1. Temperance

      2. Education

      3. Women’s Rights

      4. Anti-Slavery and Abolition

    5. Modernization and Social Tensions (22)

      1. Catholic vs. Protestant Values

      2. The Midwest: Butternuts vs. Yankees

      3. Workers

    6. Political Parties and Modernization (25)

  2. Chapter 2: The Antebellum South

    1. Southern Economy (27)

      1. Some North-South Comparisons

      2. The South as a “Colonial Economy”

      3. Southern Values vs. Economic Change

    2. Slavery in the American South (35)

      1. Herronvolk Deomcracy

      2. The Conditions of Slavery

      3. Slavery and the Work Ethic

  3. Chapter 3: The Ideological Conflict over Slavery

    1. The Antislavery Movement (43)

      1. Abolition vs. Colonization

      2. Militant Abolitionism

      3. The Politics of Abolitionism

    2. Anti-slavery and Modernization (48)

      1. The Free Labor Ideology

    3. The Proslavery Counterattack (51)

      1. From Necessary Evil to Positive Good

      2. The Wage-Slavery Theme

    4. The Cavalier Image (54)

    5. Slavery and National Politics (57)

  4. Chapter 4: Texas, Mexico, and the Compromise of 1850

    1. The Annexation of Texas (59)

    2. Manifest Destiny and the Mexican War (61)

    3. The Wilmont Proviso (65)

      1. Parties Split Along Sectional Lines

    4. The Election of 1848 (68)

    5. The Compromise of 1850 (70)

    6. The Election of 1852 (76)

  5. Chapter 5: Filibusterers, Fugitives, and Nativists

    1. Manifest Destiny and Slavery in the 1850s (79)

    2. Fugitive Slave Law (83)

      1. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850

    3. Free Soilers and Free Blacks (89)

    4. Nativism and the Rise of the Know-Nothings (90)

  6. Chapter 6: Kansas and the Rise of the Republican Party

    1. The Kansas-Nebraska Act (95)

    2. The Rise of the Republican Party (99)

    3. Bleeding Kansas (101)

    4. The Election of 1856 (105)

  7. Chapter 7: The Deepening Crisis, 1857-1859

    1. The Dred Scott Decision (109)

    2. The Lecompton Constitution (114)

    3. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates (117)

    4. Portents of Armageddon, 1858-1859 (119)

      1. Wedges of Sectional Division

      2. The Slave-Trade Controversy

      3. The Rhetoric of Sectional Conflict

  8. Chapter 8: The Critical Years, 1859-1860

    1. John Brown and the Harpers Ferry Raid (125)

    2. The Democratic Party Breaks in Two (129)

    3. The Republicans Nominate Lincoln (131)

    4. The Campaign (132)

    5. The Outcome (136)

  9. Chapter 9: Secession and the Coming of War

    1. Secession of the Lower South (139)

    2. Secession: Revolution or Counterrevolution? (141)

    3. The Northern Response to Secession (145)

      1. President Buchanan and the Crisis

      2. Proposals for Compromise

      3. Lincoln’s Position

    4. Launching the Confederacy (150)

    5. The Upper South (150)

    6. Lincoln Takes the Helm (152)

    7. Fort Sumter and the End of Peace (153)

      1. Lincoln and Fort Sumter

      2. The Confederates Fire the First Shot

Ordeal By Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction Part 2: The Civil War

  1. Chapter 10: A Brother’s War: The Upper South

    1. The Conflict Takes Shape (163)

    2. The First Clashes (165)

    3. The Eastern Border States: Maryland and Delaware (166)

    4. The Western Border States: Kentucky and Missouri (167)

      1. Kentucky

      2. Missouri

    5. West Virginia (173)

    6. East Tennessee (176)

  2. Chapter 11: Mobilizing for War

    1. Organizing the Armed Forces (179)

      1. Unreadiness for War

      2. Recruitment and Supply

      3. Why They Fought

      4. Army Organization

      5. Leadership and Training

    2. The Navies and the Blockade (192)

      1. The Confederate Navy

      2. The Union Navy

      3. The Blockade

      4. The Monitor and the Merrimack (Virginia)

      5. Results of the Blockade

  3. Chapter 12: The Balance Sheet of War

    1. Manpower and Resources (202)

      1. Confederate Conscription

    2. Confederate Advantages (204)

      1. War Aims and Morale

      2. Geography and Logistics

    3. Confederate Guerrillas (209)

    4. Men and Arms (212)

      1. Cavalry

      2. Artillery

      3. Infantry

      4. The Rifle

      5. Southern and Northern War Production and Supply

    5. Financing the War: The Confederacy (220)

    6. Financing the War: The Union (222)

      1. Creation of Greenbacks

      2. War Bonds

      3. National Banks

  4. Chapter 13: The War at Home and Abroad

    1. The First Battle of Bull Run (227)

    2. McClellan and the Army of the Potomac (232)

    3. Europe and the War (237)

    4. The King Cotton Illusion (238)

    5. The Blockade and Foreign Relations (239)

    6. The Trent Affair (241)

  5. Chapter 14: The Springtime of Northern Hope

    1. Forts Henry and Donelson (244)

    2. The Battle of Shiloh (247)

      1. Retreat and Pursuit After Battle

    3. Other Union Triumphs in the West (251)

      1. The Fall of New Orleans

      2. The Pace of Union Triumph Slows

  6. Chapter 15: Jackson and Lee Strike Back

    1. The Peninsula and Valley Campaigns in Virginia (257)

      1. McClellan’s Advance Toward Richmond

      2. Jackson in the Valley

      3. The Battle of Seven Pines and Accession of Lee

    2. The Seven Days Battles (266)’

      1. Among the Dead and the Living

    3. The Union Army and “Hard War” (272)

    4. The Second Battle of Bull Run (276)

  7. Chapter 16: Slavery and the War: Northern Politics, 1861-1862

    1. War Aims and Politics in the North (284)

      1. Lincoln’s Leadership

      2. The Meaning of Union

    2. The Slavery Issue (287)

      1. The Anti-Slavery Argument

      2. Slavery and the Republican Party

      3. Congress and Slavery

      4. Lincoln and Slavery

    3. The Copperheads (295)

      1. Democrats and Emancipation

    4. The Union Army and Emancipation (298)

    5. Colonization of Freed Slavery (300)

    6. Lincoln’s Circumlocution on Emancipation, August-September 1862

  8. Chapter 17: The First Turning Point: Antietam and Emancipation

    1. The Battle of Antietam (303)

    2. The Confederate Invasion of Kentucky (311)

      1. The Battle of Perryville

    3. The Battles of Iuka and Corinth (315)

    4. The Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation (316)

    5. Lincoln and Civil Liberties (317)

    6. The Elections of 1862 in the North (319)

    7. The Removal of McClellan and Buell from Command (321)

    8. Europe and the War, 1862 (325)

  9. Chapter 18: The Winter of Northern Discontent

    1. The Battle of Fredericksburg (327)

    2. A Crisis of Confidence in the North (330)

    3. The War in the West: The Battle of Stones River (331)

    4. The War in the West: Vicksburg (334)

      1. A Winter of Failures

      2. Success in the Spring

    5. Joe Hooker and the “Finest Army on the Planet” (341)

    6. The Battle of Chancellorsville (343)

  10. Chapter 19: The Second Turning Point: Gettysburg, Vicksburg, and Chattanooga

    1. The Gettysburg Campaign (349)

    2. The Battle of Gettysburg (352)

      1. Aftermath of the Battle

    3. Union Victories in the West (359)

      1. The Fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson

      2. The Confederate Retreat from Tennessee

    4. The Battle of Chickamauga (362)

    5. The Battles for Chattanooga (365)

    6. The War and Foreign Policy, 1863 (369)

      1. The Laird Rams

      2. Intrigues in Mexico

  11. Chapter 20: War Issues and Politics in 1863

    1. Vallandigham and the Copperhead Drive for Power (374)

    2. Black Men in Blue (374)

      1. Blacks in the Navy

      2. Recruitment of Black Soldiers

      3. Black Soldiers in Combat

    3. Conscription in the North (384)

    4. A Socioeconomic Profile of Civil War Soldiers (386)

    5. Draft Resistance and Riots in the North (388)

    6. Emancipation Confirmed (389)

    7. Political Disaffection Within the Confederacy (391)

      1. Criticism of Jefferson Davis

    8. Habeas Corpus and States’ Rights in the Confederacy (395)

    9. Opposition Leaders (396)

    10. The Disadvantages of No-Party Politics (397)

  12. Chapter 21: Behind the Lines

    1. The War’s Economic Impact on the North (399)

      1. Agriculture

      2. Transportation

      3. Industry

      4. The Civil War and Economic Growth

      5. Nonmilitary Wartime Legislation

      6. Labor and the West

    2. Economic Discontent in the South (408)

      1. Strains in Southern Agriculture

      2. Bread Riots and Hyperinflation

    3. Trading with the Enemy (412)

    4. Disease and Medical Care in the Civil War Armies (416)

    5. Women and Medical Care (422)

  13. Chapter 22: Wartime Reconstruction and Freed People

    1. Emancipation (426)

    2. The Status of Freedpeople (428)

      1. The Question of Land for Freedpeople

      2. Freedmen’s Education

      3. The Government and the Freedpeople

    3. Political Reconstruction (435)

      1. Louisiana

      2. The Wade-Davis Bill

    4. Reconstruction and Presidential Politics (440)

  14. Chapter 23: Military Stalemate, 1864

    1. Union Military Strategy in 1864 (444)

    2. Failure of the Auxiliary Campaigns (446)

      1. The Red River Campaign

      2. The James River and Shenandoah Valley Campaigns

    3. The Wilderness and Spotsylvania (448)

      1. The Battle of the Wilderness

      2. The Battle of Spotsylvania

    4. From Spotsylvania to Cold Harbor (454)

    5. The Shenandoah Valley and Petersburg (456)

      1. The Battle of the Crater

      2. Early’s Raid on Washington

    6. The Atlanta Campaigns, May-July 1864 (463)

      1. Overview of the Campaign

      2. Narrative of the Campaign

      3. Removal of Johnston from Command

      4. The Battles of Atlanta

  15. Chapter 24: The Third Turning Point: The Election of 1864

    1. Peace Feelers (471)

    2. The Democrats Nominate McClellan (475)

    3. Mobile Bay (477)

    4. The Fall of Atlanta (477)

    5. Sheridan in the Valley (478)

      1. The Petersburg Front

    6. The Copperhead Issue in the 1864 Election (481)

    7. The Prisoners of War Issue (485)

    8. The Reelection of Lincoln (492)

  16. Chapter 25: The End of the Confederacy

    1. From Atlanta to the Sea (495)

    2. The Battles of Franklin and Nashville (500)

    3. Adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment (503)

    4. Desertion from the Confederate Armies (504)

    5. The Fall of Fort Fisher and the Failure of Peace Negotiations (505)

    6. Sherman’s March Through the Carolinas (508)

    7. Destruction of Confederate Resources (512)

    8. The Reconstruction Issue in the Winter of 1864-1865 (513)

    9. The Confederate Decision to Arm Slaves (514)

    10. From Petersburg to Appomattox (515)

      1. The Fall of Petersburg and Richmond

      2. The Road to Appomattox

      3. Lee Surrenders

    11. The Assassination of Lincoln and the End of the War (520)

      1. The Martyred President

      2. The End of the War

      3. Demobilization of the Union Armies

    12. The Imprint of War (525)

Ordeal By Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction Part 3: Reconstruction

  1. Chapter 26: The Problems of Peace

    1. The Aftermath of War (533)

      1. The Attitude of Southern Whites

      2. The Attitude of Northern Whites

    2. Presidential Reconstruction, 1865 (538)

      1. Republican Response to Presidential Reconstruction

      2. The Black Suffrage Issue in the North

      3. The Revival of Southern Defiance

      4. Johnson and the South

    3. Land and Labor in the Postwar South (546)

      1. The Issue of Land for the Landless

      2. The “Labor Question” and the Freedmen’s Bureau

      3. The Black Codes

  2. Chapter 27: The Origins of “Radical” Reconstruction

    1. The Making of Another Constitutional Crisis (555)

    2. The Fourteenth Amendment (558)

    3. The Election of 1866 (561)

    4. The Military Reconstruction Acts of 1867 (563)

      1. Limitations of Presidential Power

      2. The Second Military Reconstruction Act

  3. Chapter 28: Reconstruction and the Crisis of Impeachment

    1. Johnson’s Continued Defiance of Congress (569)

      1. The Southern Response to the Reconstruction Acts

      2. The Second Impeachment Effort

    2. The Impeachment and Acquittal of Johnson (575)

      1. The House Votes Impeachment

      2. On Trial Before the Senate

    3. The Supreme Court and Reconstruction (578)

    4. Readmission of Southern States (579)

      1. The Constitutional Conventions

      2. Readmission to Congressional Representation

  4. Chapter 29: The First Grant Administration

    1. The Election of 1868 (585)

      1. The Republican Convention

      2. The Democratic Convention

      3. The Race Issue and the Ku Klux Klan

    2. The Fifteenth Amendment (590)

    3. Grant in the White House (592)

      1. The Alabama Claims

      2. The Santo Domingo Affair

    4. Civil Service Reform (596)

      1. The Roots of Liberal Republicanism

  5. Chapter 30: The Making of the New Regime in the South, 1869-1872

    1. Southern Republicans: Blacks, Carpetbaggers, and Scalawags (601)

    2. Southern Republicans in Power (608)

      1. The Corruption Issue

      2. The Amnesty Question

    3. The Security Dilemmas of the New Regime and the Problem of the Klan (612)

      1. Congressional Legislation Against the Klan

    4. The Election of 1872 (616)

      1. The Liberal Republican Convention

      2. The Campaign

  6. Chapter 31: Social and Economic Reconstruction

    1. Education in the South (623)

      1. The Segregation Issue

      2. The Civil Rights Act of 1875

    2. The New Order in Southern Agriculture (628)

      1. The Evolution of Tenantry

      2. The Ownership of Land

      3. The Crop Lien System

      4. The Poverty of Southern Agriculture

    3. Postwar Commercial and Industrial Developments (634)

      1. Postwar Railroad Development

      2. Anti-Railroad Sentiment

      3. Labor Strife

  7. Chapter 32: The Destruction of Reconstruction

    1. The Overthrow of the New Regime, 1873-1876 (639)

      1. The Coup Attempts in Louisiana

      2. The Wheeler Compromise and the Wavering Commitment of Northern Republicans

      3. The Supreme Court and Reconstruction

      4. Government Scandals

    2. The Election of 1876 (646)

      1. The Disputed Returns

    3. The Compromise of 1877 (649)

      1. The Electoral Commission

      2. Negotiations Behind the Scenes

  8. Chapter 33: The Making of the Solid South

    1. The Persistence of the Southern Question (655)

      1. The Presidential Election of 1880

      2. The Readjuster Movement in Virginia

    2. Ideology and Reality in the New South (660)

      1. The Ideology of the “New South”

      2. The Industries of the New South

      3. Northern Perceptions of the New South

      4. Education in the Post-Reconstruction South

      5. Politics in the Post-Reconstruction South

      6. Other Realities in the Post-Reconstruction South

    3. Farewell to the Bloody Shirt (667)


The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2016
send message

    Main page