Review of coastal ecosystem management to improve the health and resilience of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area



Download 0.5 Mb.
Page1/16
Date conversion18.10.2016
Size0.5 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16

Coastal Ecosystem Management - Lower Burdekin Floodplain

Review of coastal ecosystem management to improve the health and resilience of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area


australian government, great barrier reef marine park authority logo
on the front page there is an aerial photograph taken of agricultural areas in the lower burdekin floodplain. there is also the title of the document which reads: water management to support coastal ecosystems - lower burdekin floodplain - review of coastal ecosystem management to improve the health and resilience of the great barrier reef world heritage area.

Page intentionally left blank for printing double-sided.



the logo shows the australian coat of arms and reads: australian government - great barrier reef marine park authority. underneath the logo is the title of the document: water management to support coastal ecosystems - lower burdekin floodplain - review of coastal ecosystem management to improve the health and resilience of the great barrier reef world heritage area.

Coastal ecosystems management – Lower Burdekin Floodplain

Review of coastal ecosystem management to improve the health and resilience of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area


© Commonwealth of Australia 2013
Published by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority 2013
This work is copyright. You may download, display, print and reproduce this material in unaltered form only (appropriately acknowledging this source) for your personal, non-commercial use or use within your organisation. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, all other rights are reserved.
Disclaimer

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Australian Government or the Minister for Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities.


While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that the contents of this publication are factually correct, the Australian Government does not accept responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the contents, and shall not be liable for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the contents of this publication.
National Library of Australia Cataloguing-in-Publication entry

Coastal ecosystems management – case study: water management/Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority.

ISBN  978 1 922126 17 7 (ebook)

Coastal zone management--Queensland----Burdekin River Valley.
Coastal zone management--Queensland--Great Barrier Reef.
Floodplains--Queensland--Burdekin River Valley.
Natural resources management areas--Queensland--Great Barrier Reef.
Burdekin River Valley (Qld.)--Management.
Burdekin River Valley (Qld.)--Environmental conditions.
Great Barrier Reef (Qld.)--Management.
Great Barrier Reef (Qld.)--Environmental conditions.

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority.

577.099436

This publication should be cited as:

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority 2013 Coastal ecosystems management – case study: water management, GBRMPA, Townsville.



Acknowledgements

This report was supported through funding from the Australian Government Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities.


This report is based on a report commissioned by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, prepared on 13 June 2013 by Jim Tait, Econcern. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority also acknowledges the contributions of Hugh Yorkston, Donna-marie Audas, Jason Vains, Paul Groves, Carol Marshall, Melissa Evans, Ben Palmer, Rose Dunstan and Sara Dunstan.
Coverphoto: Lower Burdekin floodplain by Jim Tait (2013).
combined australian government logo for great barrier reef marine park authority and department of sustainability, environment, water, population and communities
Requests and enquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to:
Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

2-68 Flinders Street (PO Box 1379)

Townsville QLD 4810, Australia
Phone: (07) 4750 0700

Fax: (07) 4772 6093

Email: info@gbrmpa.gov.au

www.gbrmpa.gov.au



Table of contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 7

Context summary 7

Key issues 7

Current management 8

Potential management actions 8

INTRODUCTION 10

Background 10

Objectives and purpose of case study 10

METHODOLOGY 10

COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS OF THE REGION 10

Background 10

Overview of the basin within the study area 13

History of land use and development 19

Impact on coastal ecosystems 23

Impacts to ecosystem functions 36

Current condition and trend 41

Forecast of likely future activities and impacts on coastal ecosystems 48



LAND-USE MANAGEMENT AND COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS 50

Overlapping roles of government 50

Protecting existing undisturbed coastal ecosystems 52

Reconnection and rehabilitation of disturbed coastal ecosystems 55

Return of coastal ecosystem function to modified landscapes 60

Pumped Flood Flow 64

Hydrological Isolation 64

Uncertainty in assessment and managing risk 65

Adaptive management 65

DISCUSSION 67

An important landscape 67

Information Driven Management Mechanisms 68

Improving farm practices 68

Natural resource management 69

Protection of assets 70

Management of threats 71

Restoration of ecosystems and ecosystem function 71



REFERENCES 76

APPENDIX A: Ecological processes of natural coastal ecosystems linked to the health and resilience of the World Heritage Area 79

APPENDIX B: Ecological processes of modified systems linked to the health and resilience of the World Heritage Area. 81



  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16


The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2016
send message

    Main page