Rhyme: I ran around behind him for I thought that I would see The broken leg all bandaged up and bent back at the knee; But I didn't see the leg at all, there wasn't any there, So I asked him very kindly if he had it hid somewhere



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Week 6


Reading Handouts





Rhyme:

I ran around behind him for I thought that I would see

The broken leg all bandaged up and bent back at the knee;

But I didn't see the leg at all, there wasn't any there,

So I asked him very kindly if he had it hid somewhere.

"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.



Poetry – is a piece of writing in which words and their sounds are used to show images and express feelings and ideas.

Noticings

Author’s Purpose: to entertain or express

Form: includes free verse, narrative, lyrical, and haiku

Stanzas: the sections of a poem; a stanza may focus on one central idea or thought; lines in a stanza are arranged in a way that looks and sounds pleasing

Rhyme: words that have the same ending sound may be used at the ends of lines to add interest to the poem and to make it fun to read

Book Examples

Author’s Purpose: to entertain the reader with a funny poem that tells the story about a how a man lost his leg

Form: narrative poem

Stanzas:

I saw the other day when I went shopping in the store

A man I hadn't ever, ever seen in there before,

A man whose leg was broken and who leaned upon a crutch-

I asked him very kindly if it hurt him very much.

"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.


I ran around behind him for I thought that I would see

The broken leg all bandaged up and bent back at the knee;

But I didn't see the leg at all, there wasn't any there,

So I asked him very kindly if he had it hid somewhere.

"Not at all!" said the broken-legg'd man.




Poetry – is a piece of writing in which words and their sounds are used to show images and express feelings and ideas.

Noticings


Add these to anchor chart on Friday
Rhythm: the beat of how the words are read; may be fast or slow

Sound Effects:


  • Repetition occurs when poets repeat words, phrases, or lines in a poem to create a pattern, increase rhythm, and strengthen feelings, ideas and mood in a poem.

  • Rhyme Scheme the pattern of rhyme that the poet uses

  • Alliteration the repetition of the first consonant sound in words, as in the nursery rhyme “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.”

  • Onomatopoeia words that represent the actual sound of something are words of onomatopoeia. Thunder “booms,” rain “drips,” and the clock “ticks.”Appeals to the sense of sound.


Add on Monday
Imagery & Sensory Detail the use of words to create pictures, or images, in your mind. Appeals to the five senses: smell, sight, hearing, taste and touch.

Figurative Language tools that writers use to create images, or “paint pictures,” in your mind.


Add on Tuesday
Simile compares two things using the words “like” or “as.”

  • Metaphors compare two things without using the words “like” or “as.”

  • Personification gives human traits and feelings to things that are not human – like animals or objects.

Book Examples

Rhythm:


The rhythm in this poem is fast – to match the speed of the stick striking the fence.

The pickety fence

The pickety fence

Give it a lick it's

The pickety fence

Give it a lick it's

A clickety fence




The rhythm in this poem is slow – to match the night gently falling and the lights slowly coming on.

When the night begins to fall

And the sky begins to glow

You look up and see the tall

City of lights begin to grow –

Sound Effects:


  • Repetition

Someone tossed a pancake,

A buttery, buttery, pancake.

Someone tossed a pancake

And flipped it up so high,

That now I see the pancake,

The buttery, buttery pancake,

Now I see that pancake

Stuck against the sky.



  • Rhyme Scheme

  • Alliteration


see specific anchor charts for examples

Onomatopoeia

Imagery & Sensory Detail:

Figurative Language:

  • Simile

  • Metaphors

  • Personification

Topic: State Fair

Read the State Fair poem. Use this graphic organizer to collect sensory language that helps the reader create imagery.



See

Hear

Smell

Taste

Feel

Feelings

State Fair

The energy—

thousands of people swarming about Moms pushing strollers

couples holding hands

teenagers bored with excitement kids running

back and forth, around in circles

laughing Eyes wide open—

screaming, Big Tex smiles and waves

hot and sweaty. “Howdy Folks!”

cotton candy, corn dogs each ride sings its own music Ferris Wheel

stops at the top

“Hurry! Hurry! Step right up!” sticky and sunburned.

Everything at once—

auto show

carmel apples, nachos farm animals

extreme rides squeal in delight

“Announcing! The beginning of a show!” ice cream cone, funnel cake

BMX bike show pig races

spin the wheel

toss the rings Long day ending—

shoot the ball one more ride

“I won! I won!” on the carousel,

stuff the Snoopy under my arm enough of

chili and cheese fries the fried food

Texas Skyway the sweet cakes,

thirsty, the voices and laughter

dusty and dirty. of a thousand people

fading away, slowing down, dragging feet, dragging Snoopy, hot and sweaty, sticky,

sunburned, dusty, dirty,

“Where’s the car?”


Topic: State Fair

***The highlighted Sensory Details are the ones you can use for modeling during your Minilesson.



See
Big Tex Ferris Wheel

Thousands of people Auto Show

Bike Show Farm Animals Crafts

Rides – Texas Skyway, Extreme Rides, Carousel

Games


Hear
Hurry, hurry! Step right up!” People laughing

People screaming (on rides) Music playing

An announcer shouting the beginning of a performance

Everything is loud



Smell
Fried food Sweet cakes Beer

Animal smells in the barns Straw in the barns



Taste
Cotton Candy Corn Dogs

Ice Cream Cones Funnel Cakes Soda

Carmel Apples Nachos

Chili & Cheese Fries



Feel
Hot Sweaty Sticky

Sun burned Dusty

Dirty


Feelings
Excited

Lots of energy

Want to do everything at once Eyes are wide



Figurative Language

Type of Figurative Language

Definition

Example

Simile

Comparison of 2 things using like or as

The emerald is as green as grass.

Metaphor

Comparison of 2 things but does not use like or as

The night is a big, black cat.

Personification

Giving human traits & feelings to things that are not human (animals/objects)

The moon smiled down at me.

Idiom

Phrase that has a figurative meaning

She’s pulling my leg.

He laughed his head off.





Figurative Language

Type of Figurative Language

Definition

Example

Simile

Comparison of 2 things using like or as




Metaphor

Comparison of 2 things but does not use like or as




Personification

Giving human traits & feelings to things that are not human (animals/objects)




Idiom

Phrase that has a figurative meaning






Big Bully Joe

by Arden Davidson


Big Bully Joe is a kid I know who’s as mean as a grizzly bear. He’s tall and he’s strong.

We just don’t get along.

There’s not one thing in common we share.
When a baby’s diaper falls off, you know Joe took out the pins. Joe likes to torture little ones that’s how he gets his grins.
When there’s gum in someone’s hair, you know it’s Joe who blew the bubble. When the teacher shouts “who did this?” you know Big Joe’s in big trouble.
When a food does not agree with Joe he argues till he wins.

He likes to fight.

He also likes to kick dogs in their shins.
He calls out horrid names

to kids just doing their own thing. If he saw an injured bird,

he’d likely break it’s other wing.
Big Bully Joe is a kid I know

who doesn’t have one single friend.

But I heard Kelly Mayer put a tack on his chair.

Guess he’ll pay for it all in the end!
What it Looks Like on a Test…


______________________________________________________________________________________
Read this sentence from paragraph ___

The imagery in these lines appeal most to the reader’s sense of –

In paragraph ___, “a nightlight offering comfort from a bad dream” means that the light makes the boys feel –

4.8/Fig 19D

What it Looks Like on a Test…



The paragraph above the title of the poem is included to –

4.4/Fig 19D

The reader can tell that the poem is written in free-verse form because it does not have –

Which poetic structure is found in the poem? (Stanzas, Rhythm, Use of Repetition, Short Line Length)

Which word rhyme in each stanza of the poem?

4.4A
Carmen is a student at Pleasant Hill Elementary School. “Miss D.” is Carmen’s teacher. Miss D.’s mother, Grams, likes to visit the classroom and share her time with the students. In this poem, Miss D. asks the class to vote on how to spend the money left over at the end of the school year.
CARMEN

Secret Ballot

by Andrea Cheng
School’s almost out.

We have to spend the money somehow.

We put suggestions

5 on the board: Pizza party. Roller skating.

How about thinking of other people?

10 Miss D. says.

Kayla raises her hand. A present for Grams, she says.

What would Grams like?

15 I put my head down and shut my eyes and think.

A big picture of us

in front of Pleasant Hill,

20 I say.

We vote


on slips of paper called secret ballots. Pizza gets four,

25 skating gets three, and the picture wins.
From Where the Steps Were by Andrea Cheng. Copyright © 1994 by Andrea Cheng. Published by Wordsong, an imprint of Boyds Mills Press. Reprinted by permission.

  1. The reader can tell that the poem is written in free-verse form because it does not have —




    1. a serious subject




    1. plot and conflict




    1. a rhyming pattern




    1. a common theme



  1. Which poetic structure is found in the poem?




  1. Stanzas




  1. Rhythm




  1. Use of repetition




  1. Short line length



  1. The paragraph above the title of the poem is included to —




  1. help readers understand how the students feel about their teacher




  1. persuade readers to write a poem about a special school event




  1. encourage readers to think about their school experiences




  1. provide background information about details that readers would not know


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