Sae competency All agriscience students have supervised agricultural experience programs based on career pathways/clusters/interests and agricultural curriculum standards. I



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SAE

Competency

All agriscience students have supervised agricultural experience programs based on career pathways/clusters/interests and agricultural curriculum standards.

I




Course Objective 1: Agriculture teacher candidates will be able to articulate the theories of experiential learning as they relate to school-based agricultural education.

Lesson Objectives: Students will be able to:

  1. identify the five stages of Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model (Experiencing; Sharing; Processing; Generalizing; Applying) with 100% accuracy.

  2. develop an example of how the school-based agricultural education model could be utilized to address each of Kolb’s components of the Experiential Learning Model to instructor satisfaction.

  3. formulate a process to achieve all five stages of Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model for secondary school agriculture students through supervised agricultural experience to instructor satisfaction.

Equipment, Supplies, References, and Other Resources:

Pre-Class Reading Options:

  • AFS Intercultural Programs. (2015). Debriefing Experiential Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.afs.org/afs-intercultural-link/icl-for-friends/

  • Baker, M. A., Robinson, S. J., & Kolb, D. A. (2012). Aligning Kolb’s experiential learning theory with a comprehensive agricultural education model. Journal of Agricultural Education 53(4), 1-16. DOI: 10.5032/jae.2012.04001. Available online at: http://www.jae-online.org/attachments/article/1694/53.4.1%20Baker.pdf

  • Retallick, M. S. (2010, July/August). A minds-on approach to experiential learning in agricultural education. The Agricultural Education Magazine 83(1), 9-11. Available online at: http://www.naae.org/profdevelopment/magazine/archive_issues/Volume83/2010_07-08.pdf

References:

  • Phipps, L. J., Osborne, E. W., Dyer, J. E., & Ball, A. (2008). Chapter 26: Overview of supervised agricultural experience programs (p 437-452). Handbook on Agricultural Education in Public Schools, 6th edition. Delmar: Clifton Park, NY.

Handouts:

  • CIRCLES Kolb’s Experiential Learning Activity [5 circles/group; different colors] (see Figure 1.Circles for Applied Activity for example)

  • Figure 1. Circles for Applied Activity

  • Kolb’s Definitions of Stages [1 set per group; white paper]

  • Lecture Worksheet [ 1 per individual]

  • Index Cards with one of each of the 5 stages written on them (Party Host Moment)

Computer and video projection equipment:

  • Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model PPT

  • LCD projector and internet access

Equipment & Supplies:

  • Flip charts

  • Markers

Deeper Dive Resources (for extended thinking/advanced students):

  • UC-Davis Experiential Learning Training Module 

  • Link: http://www.experientiallearning.ucdavis.edu/modules.shtml

Teacher Directions

Content Outline and/or Procedures

REVIEW

Note: Ideally, students would be assigned a pre-reading assignment from the three references listed above.

INTEREST APPROACH

Handout CIRCLES Kolb’s Experiential Learning Activity



Break students into groups of 4 or 5.

Have students capture top 5 facts from the pre-class reading. Report out each group to capture “best of facts.”


Task student groups to organize the CIRCLES handout according to what makes sense to them as a way to engage with “Experiential Learning.”
Conduct a Gallery Walk to allow each group to see how the other groups organized

    • NOTE: Gallery Walk is a discussion technique that gets students out of their chairs and into a mode of active engagement. The advantage of the method is its flexibility and the variety of benefits for students and instructor alike. For more information:

    • http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/gallerywalk/what.html

OBJECTIVES AND TEACHING STRATEGIES
Objective

a. identify the five stages of Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model (Experiencing; Sharing; Processing; Generalizing; Applying) with 100% accuracy

PPT slides 1-12


Handout Definitions of Kolb’s Stages


Handout Lecture Worksheet




Utilize PowerPoint to share about the Experiential Learning Theory.
Return to the circle activity. Allow students to revise relationships and match correct definitions.
Check understanding of stages, order, and definitions. Have students complete question number 1 of the Lecture Worksheet while you verbally give examples. Students should identify each stage and in their own words a definition.
Understanding the Experiential Learning Cycle, 5-Step Experiential Learning Cycle Definitions (See UC-Davis Webpage)
EXPLORATION: “Do it”

Perform or do an activity with little to no help from the facilitator/teacher. Examples might include: making products or models; role-playing; giving a presentation; problem-solving; playing a game.



Features of experiences include:

  1. May be an individual or group experience, but involves doing.

  2. Most likely will be unfamiliar to the learners – a first-time activity.

  3. Pushes the learner beyond previous performance levels.

  4. May be “uncomfortable”


SHARING: “What Happened”

Publicly share the results, reactions, and observations. Get the participants to talk about their experience. Share reactions and observations. Discuss feelings generated by the experience. Let the group (or individual) talk freely and acknowledge the ideas they generate.


Examples of sharing questions:

  1. What did you do?

  2. What happened?

  3. What did you see, feel, hear, taste?

  4. What was the most difficult? Easiest?


PROCESSING: “What’s Important?”

Discussing, analyzing, reflecting, and looking at the experience. Discuss how the experience was carried out. Discuss how themes, problems, and issues are brought out by the experience. Discuss how specific problems or issues were addressed. Discuss personal experiences of members. Encourage the group to look for recurring themes.


Examples of processing questions:

  1. What problems or issues seemed to occur over and over?

  2. What similar experience(s) have you had?



GENERALIZING: “So What?”

Connect the experience with real world examples. Find general trends or common truths in the experience. Identify “real life” principles that surfaced. List key terms that capture the learning.


Examples of generalizing questions:

  1. What did you learn about yourself through this activity?

  2. Why is (life skill) important in your daily life?

  3. How does what you learned relate to other parts of your life?



APPLICATION: “Now What?”

Apply what was learned to a similar or different situation, learn from past experiences, and practice. Discuss how new learning can be applied to other situations. Discuss how issues raised can be useful in the future. Discuss how more effective behaviors can develop from the new learnings. Help each individual feel a sense of ownership for what was learned.


Example questions about applying the experience:

  1. How can you apply what you learned to a new situation?

  2. How will you act differently in the future?

  3. How could you apply life skills learned through this practice in the future?

Objective

b. develop an example of how the school-based agricultural education model could be utilized to address each of Kolb’s components of the Experiential Learning Model to instructor satisfaction
THINK-PAIR-SHARE
PPT slide 13

Utilize Think-Pair-Share Model

  1. Have each student individually complete question 2 of the Lecture Worksheet.

  2. Have students pair and compare.

  3. Have 1 or 2 groups share.

Repeat for Lecture Worksheet question 3 (FFA)




Objective

c. formulate a process to achieve all five stages of Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model for secondary school agriculture students through supervised agricultural experience to instructor satisfaction
PPT slide 14-15

Working in teams of three, have students design an example, answering question 4 of the Lecture Worksheet. Indicate that they need to create an example for three types of SAE:

  1. Paid labor (Placement) SAE (Working for Someone Else)

  2. Business/Ownership (Entrepreneurship) SAE (Project)

  3. Research SAE (Individual Research Project)

Note: It is anticipated that students would not have learned “types” of SAEs yet, but working with terms will help comprehension.




REVIEW/SUMMARY

Party Host E-Moment:

Host party until the host can identify each person by which stage he/she is by questions. [Note: Stage characters cannot say the word they are in any response]

EVALUATION

Optional quiz utilizing the Lecture Worksheet.




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