Sample lesson – grade 7 8 – a gender issue (boys only) Note To Teacher This topic is recommended as a boys only



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SAMPLE LESSON – GRADE 7 8 – A GENDER ISSUE (BOYS ONLY)

Note To Teacher

This topic is recommended as a boys only activity. Background information can be found in the insert Current Research on Adolescent Boys: How Boys Construct their Views of Male and Female Sexuality. Teachers may wish to hold the boys only and girls only activities in Unpretty – A Video Topic for Girls concurrently, having another colleague take one of the groups for instruction.



Activity 4A: Video And Computer Games: Surveying The Field Body Image Expectations

Students will:

  • Develop an awareness of self and societal pressures on masculinity.

  • Develop an awareness of self and societal pressures on masculinity that result in behaviours that impact on girls’ body image.

Curriculum Expectations

Oral And Visual Communication

Grade 7 students will:

  • Identify various types of media works and a variety of the techniques used in them.

  • Use instructions and explanations to plan and organize work.

  • Ask questions and discuss different aspects of ideas in order to clarify their thinking.

  • Identify and describe categories of works typical of a particular medium (e.g., television – sitcom, talk show, news broadcast, interview, children's program, commercial).

  • Contribute and work constructively in groups.

  • Analyze and interpret media works.

  • Contribute and work constructively in groups.

Grade 8 students will:

  • Listen attentively to organize and classify information and to clarify thinking.

  • Listen to and communicate connected ideas and relate carefully constructed narratives about real and fictional events.

  • Express and respond to a range of ideas and opinions concisely, clearly, and appropriately.

  • Contribute and work constructively in groups.

  • Demonstrate the ability to concentrate by identifying main points and staying on topic.

  • Identify a wide range of media works and describe the techniques used in them.

  • Analyze and interpret media works.

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of various informational media works (e.g., a website on the internet, a documentary film, television or radio news programs, news magazines).

  • Provide clear answers to questions and well-constructed explanations or instructions in classroom work.

Materials

  • chart paper cut into strips

  • markers

  • Video And Computer Game Survey, line master 4A

  • Video And Computer Game Survey, line master 4B

Part 1 – Focus

  1. Introduce the activity by having the students brainstorm the names of the computer and video games they play, both popular and not. List the games on chart paper for future reference.

  2. Agree on a definition of a rating system as a way of determining the acceptability of a particular game based on specific criteria. Why is a rating system created?

  3. Ask the students to describe the rating system for computer or video games. (This could include E for everyone, T for Teen and M for mature).

  4. Brainstorm the criteria for each element of the rating scale, i.e., violence, language, graphics, sexual content, drugs, alcohol, level of difficulty, overall rating.

  5. Explain to the students that they will have the task of researching the elements of computer and video games through surveys. Explain also that the rating scale should give the researchers an understanding of how males and females view and use computer and video games.

Part 2 – Explore

  1. In order to develop a survey form for video and computer games, students need to review the elements of a survey. Elements of a survey include:

    • Need for consistent questions so data from respondents can be collated.

    • Free choice or limited choices. A list of choices should be developed by the group for certain questions to limit the number of responses. Games change over time, so this list will vary. Another category (specify) should be included as an option.

    • Biased versus random surveys. This will be a biased survey as only those who play video games will be included, although the participants do not have to be heavy users.

    • A broad sample population, large enough to validate the findings, (should include males and females, students from grades 6 to 8 and adults).

    • Number of people they should interview (four to five people per group member). They should only interview people that they know.

    • Girls should be interviewed to ensure that their perspective is included in the survey.

    • No duplication of respondents.

    • Suitability of the telephone as a survey tool. This would be acceptable, but students should only telephone people they know.

    • Level of game ratings that is acceptable. Due to the sexual content and violence, it is recommended that only Teen and Everyone rated games be included. Mature games should not be included. Students must stress that during interviews.

  2. Display line master 4A and line master 4B, Video And Computer Game Survey on the overhead to give students some ideas for survey development. Remind students that the purpose of the survey is to determine how males and females view and use computer and video games.

  3. In groups of four, have students work together to formulate questions for the survey.

  4. Students then work in groups of eight to compare questions and choose the best questions for the survey. These questions should be written on individual pieces of chart paper, cut into strips and posted on the blackboard.

  5. As a class, look for questions that are similar and group them.

  6. Set aside all other questions.

  7. Cooperatively rework the similar ideas into questions. This may be done as a class or the task can be divided up and distributed to different groups.

  8. The remainder of the ideas should be examined and rewritten for inclusion.

  9. After students and teacher have agreed on the survey form, it should be keyed into a computer. The students must receive the teacher’s approval before printing.

  10. Make sure each student receives enough copies (four to five) for each interview. See line master 4B, Video And Computer Game Survey for an alternative to copying five separate surveys for every student.

Part 3 – Guided Practice

Have the students practice by interviewing someone from another group to complete their first survey.



Part 4 – Independent Practice

  1. Provide each student with copies of the survey so they can interview game players.

  2. Students must administer the survey themselves, not just leave it for the interviewee to complete.

  3. Remind them of the survey criteria. They must interview a game user and use only T and E games.

Home Connection

Students should survey adults or older sisters and brothers who play computer games at home.



Assessment

The teacher can assess students on the basis of group work. Both the group work on the survey and the survey may be assessed using the criteria below (see line master IE). See pp 46-47, The Ontario Curriculum: Language (1997).

Did the student:


  • Listen attentively to organize and classify information and to clarify thinking?

  • Carefully express and respond to a range of ideas and opinions appropriately?

  • Demonstrate the ability to concentrate by identifying main points and staying on topic?

  • Contribute collaboratively in group situations by asking questions and building on the ideas of others?

  • Work with members of their group to establish clear purposes and procedures for solving problems and completing projects?

  • Use instructions and explanations to plan and organize work?

Media Studies (see pp 46-47, The Ontario Curriculum Language (1997))

  • Identify and describe categories of computer and video games.

  • Formulate questions to facilitate research on issues and problems of computer and video games.

Taking The Activity Further
Curriculum Connections – Computer Connection

The survey could be developed on the computer, incorporating computer skills by introducing tools such as scroll bars, radio buttons, tabs, and drop down menus.



Accommodations and Modifications

ESL or communication students could work in pairs. They could work with the interviewee to complete the survey together.


Activity 4B: Games Survey Analysis Body Image Expectations

Students will:

  • Develop an awareness of self and societal pressures on masculinity.

  • Develop an awareness of self and societal pressures on masculinity resulting in behaviours that impact on girls’ body image.

Curriculum Expectations

Oral And Visual Communication

Grade 7 students will:

  • Express and respond to a range of ideas and opinions concisely, clearly, and appropriately.

  • Analyze and interpret media works.

  • Contribute and work constructively in groups.

Grade 8 students will:

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of various informational media (e.g., a website on the internet, a documentary film, television or radio news programs, news magazines).

  • Express and respond to a range of ideas and opinions concisely, clearly, and appropriately.

  • Analyze and interpret media works.

Data Management (Mathematics)

Grade 7 students will:

  • Systematically collect, organize, and analyze data.

  • Use computer applications to examine and interpret data in a variety of ways.

  • Interpret displays of data and present the information using mathematical terms.

  • Evaluate data and make conclusions from the analysis of data.

Grade 8 students will:

  • Systematically collect, organize, and analyze primary data.

  • Use computer applications to examine and interpret data in a variety of ways.

  • Interpret displays of data and present the information using mathematical terms.

  • Evaluate data and draw conclusions from the analysis of data.

Materials

  • chart paper

  • overhead acetate sheet

  • overhead projector

  • markers

  • completed survey forms

  • computer and spreadsheet program lined paper

  • rulers and pencils

Part 1 – Focus

  1. Have each group of students design a master tally sheet for one question of the survey. Some groups may have to design two tally sheets, depending on the number of questions on the survey. Example: What do male characters use to solve problems?




    Tally

    Frequency

    Violence







    Planning







    Creative thinking







    Team work







    Tactical thinking







  2. Post the tally sheets on the wall around the classroom, or on the corridor wall.

  3. Students collate their own survey results on their survey forms.

  4. Individually, students will select a question to begin and record the survey results. By having students begin at different questions you avoid congestion and minimize disruption.

  5. Students will rotate to each question until every survey response has been recorded.

  6. Collate the results of the master tally sheets to create one survey response sheet. This can be done on an overhead acetate sheet, on chart paper, or on a spreadsheet using the computer.

Part 2 – Explore

  1. After students have recorded their results on the chart paper for each question, divide the students into pairs.

  2. Students should be reminded of bar graph criteria, i.e., number line and name line, scale beginning at 0, title, etc.

  3. Each pair will select a different question and create a bar graph on chart paper for the data. If computers are available, students can complete this activity on the computer. Grade 8 students may do their graph as a circle graph.

  4. Students should process the data by drawing verbal conclusions. Example: More than twice as many males thought XXXX or The fact that more than 50 per cent of those surveyed preferred fantasy games, explains why XXXX was identified as the favourite game.

  5. Record the conclusions that they draw from the data and post them with a suitable graph.

Part 3 – Guided Practice

  1. Encourage students to use expressions like, of those surveyed, to ensure that they understand that this is a biased sample, not a random sample.

  2. Discuss the findings by asking the following questions:

  1. What questions had results that you did not expect? Explain the discrepancy.

  2. What questions had results you could have predicted? Explain why.

  3. How did age affect the results?

  4. How were the results different when comparing the amount of time spent playing computer or video games?

Part 4 – Independent Practice

  1. Using a variety of graphs and written analysis, independently write a response to these questions:

  1. How do females view and use video and computer games differently than males?

  2. What recommendations would you have for designing games that would appeal to females?

  1. Students should use the survey responses in determining their analysis.

  1. How were the games the females chose different from the games that males chose?

  2. What was the most common response describing how the males felt playing these computer and video games?

  3. What was the most common response describing how the females felt playing these computer and video games?

  4. What questions would you add to get a more complete picture of the differences between male and female views?

Assessment

Students should be encouraged to discuss the survey results with their families. If students have computer or video games, they should invite their parents to play.



Taking The Activity Further

Curriculum Connections – Computer Connection

Students could develop bar and circle graphs on the computer using the data.


Accommodations And Modifications

Working in pairs or in small groups will encourage the participation of ESL or communication students.


Activity 4C: Character Analysis Body Image Expectations
Students will:

  • Critically examine and deconstruct media images and messages targeted at adolescent audiences affecting self-esteem and body image.

Curriculum Expectations

Oral Language And Communication

Grade 7 students will:

  • Express and respond to a range of ideas and opinions concisely, clearly, and appropriately.

  • Analyze and interpret media works.

Grade 8 students will:

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of various informational media works (e.g., a website on the internet, a documentary film, television or radio news programs, news magazines).

  • Express and respond to a range of ideas and opinions concisely, clearly, and appropriately.

  • Analyze and interpret media works.

Materials

  • Character Analysis, line master 4C

Part 1 – Focus

  1. Discuss:

  1. Stereotypes are found in magazines, TV programs, books, and in advertising. Are video games equally at fault?

  2. Think of some of the video and computer games that you play. How are the characters depicted?

  3. Students will analyze the characters in video and computer games, examining their portrayal from the point of view of gender stereotypes.

Part 2 – Explore

  1. Students brainstorm the names of main characters in video games. Ensure that female characters are included.

  2. Brainstorm the roles the characters play in various video games, i.e., hunter, race car driver, etc.

  3. Choose one character from the list and work cooperatively to complete the character study using line master 4C.

Part 3 – Independent Practice

Students should complete the Character Analysis (line master 4C) for two separate characters, one male and one female.



Home Connection

Discuss their findings with parents.



Activity 4D: Analysis Of Video And Computer Game Characters Part 1 – Focus

Through discussion and reflection, students will explore violence and stereotyping in the portrayal of both women and men in video and computer games.



According to a study by MediaWatch, the average Saturday morning cartoon has 25 acts of violence per hour. By the time children leave elementary school they have witnessed 8,000 murders and 100,000 acts of violence on TV. In this analysis of video and computer games it is important to examine the nature of violence and success in video games and the ways that men and women are portrayed.
Part 2 – Explore

  1. Students should discuss their character analyses, including what strengths characters have, what weaknesses, the portrayal of women and the role of violence.

  2. The analysis should include discussions of the following related to violent games:

  1. How is success defined in those video and computer games? Examine killing, the kill ratio, and the reward for violence.

  2. What is the main way of solving problems? Examine the role of violence and illegal acts.

  3. How is violence defined? Is it portrayed as unavoidable and pervasive, having no negative consequences, glamorous, the ultimate solution?

  4. How are men portrayed? Are they dominant, dominating, ultra-violent, rarely using intellect or language to solve problems, detached, cool, loners?

  5. How are women portrayed? Are they passive victims, needing rescue? Or if they are not passive, do they appear as ultra-violent dominators?

  6. How are women objectified?

  7. Why do video and computer games appeal more to males?

  8. How could they be made more attractive to girls? Invite the girls to be part of this discussion.

  9. What character do you relate to the most in video or computer games? Explain.

  1. Further discussions might include:

  1. Violence as entertainment.

  2. Sexploitation in games.

  3. The line between child and adult entertainment.

  1. Written Reflection:

  1. What characteristics do you admire most in the characters? Are these the characteristics you admire in real people?

  1. Discuss these questions.

Accommodations And Modifications

For ESL or communication students, this could be completed as a drawing with a character on one side and a real person on the other, with characteristics as labels around each drawing.


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