Schedule of programs and exhibitions



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Revised for release

Aug. 20, 2015
Media Contact: Laura Carpenter, (907) 929-9227, lcarpenter@anchoragemuseum.org

SCHEDULE OF PROGRAMS AND EXHIBITIONS

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015
*EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: This release replaces previous schedules. Download related media images at www.anchoragemuseum.org/media.
Information provided below is subject to change. To confirm details and dates, call the Marketing and Public Relations Department at (907) 929-9227.
News page 1

September Events page 2

October Events page Error: Reference source not found

Planetarium page 15

Classes and Workshops page Error: Reference source not found

Upcoming Exhibitions page 21

Current Exhibitions page 22

Partner Programs page 24

Visitor Information page 24

NEWS


Call for artwork: All Alaska Biennial

The Anchorage Museum invites entries to the first “All Alaska Biennial,” celebrating four decades of work by Alaska artists. The museum’s juried exhibitions (“All Alaska Juried Exhibition” and “Earth, Fire & Fibre”) began more than 30 years ago to encourage the creation of new works by Alaska artists in all media. The All Alaska Biennial will celebrate the contemporary work of Alaska artists and works are encouraged to explore the authentic North, its people, materials and landscapes, through a variety of interpretations. The juror is Jen Budney, an independent writer and curator who has held positions with the Mendel Art Gallery, Kamloops Art Gallery, Canada Council for the Arts, Gallery 101, and Flash Art International. Submissions for these exhibitions are accepted through CallForEntry.org. Deadline: Sept. 6, 2015



Artist Intervention: Out of the Box

Out of the Box is a multi-artist performance series presenting indigenous perspectives on the legacies of Captain Cook’s voyages. Among the themes explored is culture as commodity. Out of the Box artists challenge stereotypes by using cardboard boxes to represent the metaphorical boxes society places on Alaska Native peoples. Previous performances included artist Ryan Romer performing as Billy Billiken, an all-knowing “ice road scholar” who dispenses wisdom from a box. Viewers became participants when Sarah Whalen confronted the secrecy and shame that enshrouds domestic violence by inviting passersby to write their own personal stories on her box. Each performance is a thought-provoking response to “Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage.” The next Out of the Box performance happens Friday, Sept. 4


Urban Interventions: Artists explore identity through the rich heritage of traditional tattooing

Greenlandic tattoo artist Maya Jacobsen joins Anchorage-based Iñupiaq artist Holly Nordlum this fall in an exploration of the cultural significance of traditional tattooing. Facial and hand tattooing was common throughout the Arctic until the turn of the 20th century, before contact with missionaries whose influence discouraged the practice. A small but growing number of indigenous people from Greenland to Alaska have begun to re-evaluate traditional tattooing as a method for healing identity and reclaiming history. Drawing inspiration from the Anchorage Museum and Smithsonian collections, Jacobsen and Nordlum will examine traditional tattoo designs and techniques. Through a series of workshops, they will work with artists and local youth to explore the heritage of tattooing by designing personalized temporary tattoos. Upcoming programming includes demonstrations of traditional thread tattooing.


Material Traditions: Voices from Cedar

Whistles, rattles, and clappers summon spirits and echo their voices during the dances and ceremonies of the indigenous peoples of Southeast Alaska. Carved from red or yellow cedar, these traditional instruments blend distinctive musical sounds with complex forms. Master carvers John Hudson (Tsimshian), Norman Jackson (Tlingit), and Donald Varnell (Haida) demonstrate how these instruments are made and share knowledge of their cultural meanings during the Voices from Cedar artists’ residency at the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. The artists will teach students and compare their own work to historical examples in the Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage exhibition on the second floor of the museum’s west wing. Museum members and the public are welcome to meet the artists during open house hours from 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 8 and Friday, Oct. 9.



OFF-SITE EVENTS


Photo Identification Event

Monday through Tuesday and Thursday through Saturday, Oct. 12-17

Alaska Federation of Natives, Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center

Attendees of the Elders and Youth Conference and Alaska Federation of Native Conference view and identify images from the Anchorage Museum’s photo archives. Details gathered during this event help add critical information missing from these images so that researchers, curators, genealogists, and the general public can access them and learn more about life in the North. Since the photo ID project started in 2013, the museum’s Atwood Resource Center has received information for hundreds of photographs. 8 to 5 p.m. Monday to Tuesday, Oct. 12-13; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday to Friday, Oct. 15-16; and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 17.



Tupik Mi: Skin-Stitched Tattoo Demo

2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12

Location TBA

Tattooing was once common throughout the Arctic, until western religion censured the practice. Now, a growing number of indigenous people from Greenland to Alaska have begun to reevaluate traditional tattooing as a method for connecting and reclaiming culture. In this demonstration, Greenlandic tattoo artist Maya Sialuk Jacobsen uses skin-stitched techniques to tattoo Inupiaq artist Holly Mititquq Nordlum. Part of the Anchorage Museum's Urban Intervention Series of Polar Lab that aims to empower youth through healthy creative expression.



SEPTEMBER EVENTS


Discovery Center Science Demonstrations

1 p.m., 3 p.m., and 4:30 p.m. daily Sept. 1-30

Meet the Anchorage Museum’s reptiles and marine animals, explore the hidden layers in candy and learn how to create a static charge. These science experiences intrigue and amuse. Demonstrations vary. Science demonstrations: 3 p.m. daily. Animal demonstrations: 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. daily. Included with admission
61° Workshop: Blink

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday through Friday, Sept 1-30

Preschoolers and toddlers get creative, experiment and play with a variety of hands-on activities and demonstrations. New themes and ways to explore the museum each week. Part of the museum's Blink series which introduces children 5 and younger and their families to a range of activities, including open-ended play, hands-on workshops, literacy and storytelling, art, and science. Included with admission
Summer Tours

11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m. daily through Sept. 7

Join a museum docent for a 45-minute guided tour and learn about Alaska’s history, art, indigenous people and more. Tours vary each day and options include museum highlights and tours of the Anchorage Centennial exhibition “City Limits.” For the daily schedule visit the front desk or call (907) 929-9215. Included with admission
Light: Beyond the Bulb Exhibit

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily through Sept. 30

This open-source international exhibit showcases the incredible variety of light-based science being researched today across the electromagnetic spectrum, across scientific disciplines, and across technological platforms. The exhibit materials and images were crowd-sourced and curated by experts for science content, beauty and ability to engage wide audiences. The images are displayed in the Anchorage Museum's Discovery Center. Included with admission
Smithsonian Spotlight: In the Scheme of All Matters Iñupiaq

Noon to 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3

According to Iñupiaq scholar Edna Ahgeak MacLean, Ph.D., "Courses of change to the Iñupiaq people of the North Slope will require strong programs for the retention of our identity as Iñupiat." In this lecture she discusses how her recently published North Slope Iñupiaq dictionary plays a part in this process. The Smithsonian Spotlight lecture series features Alaska Native artists, scholars and researchers on the first Thursday of each month. Hosted by the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum. Included with admission

Curated Conversations: Edges

Noon to 1:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 4

Panelists Edgar Heap of Birds, Princess Lucaj Johnson, Aaron Leggett and others discuss the different edges around the legacies of Captain Cook and other "explorers" who claimed and renamed places with a long history of use by indigenous people. The curated conversations series takes place over the next two years during the time the U.S. holds the chairmanship of the Arctic Council. Part of the Anchorage Museum’s Polar Lab, a series of programs exploring life in the North. Sponsored by The CIRI Foundation. Included with admission
Conservator's Corner

2 to 4 p.m. Fridays, Sept. 4–25

Get a behind-the scenes look at an Anchorage Museum conservator in action. Ask questions while the conservator repairs and preserves cultural and historical objects at a mobile conservation station, and learn how a conservator applies knowledge of materials and scientific methods to care for the museum's collection. Included with admission
Battle of the Breweries

6 to 9 p.m., Friday, Sept. 4

Join us for beer flights in Muse restaurant on First Friday. September's selections are porters featuring Alaskan Brewing Company Porter, Kassik’s Porter and Silver Gulch Porter. Ages 21 and older $5 per flight
Museum Interventions: Out of the Box

7:30 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 4

This multi-artist performance presents indigenous perspectives on the legacies of Captain Cook’s voyages. Among the themes explored is culture as a commodity. Out of the Box artists challenge stereotypes by using cardboard boxes to represent the metaphorical boxes society places on Alaska Native peoples. Curated by Sonya Kelliher-Combs and held in response to the exhibition “Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage.” Free
The Engaged Muse: Politics, Poetry and Narrative

7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 8

What do politics, poetry and narrative have in common? Isn’t politics, like sex, verboten at the dinner table or in polite society? If you think of Canadians as passive or ‘nice,’ meet a couple of writers who don’t hesitate to write about social and political issues. Author Ann Eriksson and poet Gary Geddes are known for their challenging writing on difficult political subjects. They cover controversial topics without letting content overwhelm their art and without becoming ideologues or partisans. This discussion and book signing is presented by 49 Writers and the Anchorage Museum. Free
Tupik Mi: Reviving the Tradition of Skin-Stitched Tattoos Presentation

7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10

Tattooing was once common throughout the Arctic, until western religion censured the practice. Now, a growing number of young indigenous women from Greenland to Alaska have begun to reevaluate traditional tattooing as a method for healing identity and reclaiming culture. In this presentation, Greenlandic tattoo artist Maya Sialuk Jacobsen and Inupiaq artist Holly Mititquq Nordlum discuss pathways to cultural empowerment for indigenous youth by exploring the rich heritage of traditional tattooing. Part of the Anchorage Museum's Urban Intervention Series of Polar Lab that aims to empower youth through healthy creative expression. Free
Music in the Museum

12:15 to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 11

Enjoy a lunchtime classical concert for all ages presented by the Sitka Summer Music Festival. Cellist Zuill Bailey and pianist Susan Reed perform pieces by Bach, Bruch, and Bloch. Included with admission
Polar Nights

6 to 9 p.m. Fridays, Sept. 11-25

This Friday night series enlivens our nights through activities centering around art, culture, the environment, and the way northern urbanites gather and meet. Part of the Anchorage Museum’s Polar Lab, a series of programs exploring life in the North. Selected galleries and spaces are open late every Friday, and admission is half the usual price.

Sept. 11 Featured artist in the shop: Susan Serna and Pink Floyd: Wish You Were Here

Sept. 18 Outsiders: Camp stove cook-off

Sept. 25 Spark!Nite and Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon


Meet the Artist

6:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 11

Anchorage artist Susan Serna’s metal jewelry was a popular staple in the Museum Shop for years. When physical demands forced her to change mediums, she transitioned to photography, and her raven series provides a contemporary, urban interpretation of this iconic bird. Meet Serna and learn more about her process and work. Admission is half-priced as part of the museum's Polar Nights series each Friday.
61° Workshop: Blink

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 12

Imagine, build and play during this open gathering for ages 2 to 5 years old and their caregivers. This session features “Imagination Playground,” an innovative play system that allows for creativity and promotes collaboration and communication through child-directed play. Part of the museum's Blink series which introduces children 5 and younger and their caregivers to a range of activities, including open-ended play, hands-on workshops, literacy and storytelling, art, and science. Included with admission
Art Lab

1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12

Think, create and compose during this open gathering for all ages. Explore new materials and processes. Each session will have a theme and suggested uses of materials, or you are welcome to make your own creation with available materials in this open-ended art studio. Included with admission
Monthly Wine Tasting

5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 17

Upstream Wines, the featured wine of September hails from the Lodi Valley in California. Come experience their Cabernet Franc, Rose and Chardonnay varietals for $7 per glass and $16 per flight. Ages 21 and older
Music in the Museum

12:15 to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18

Enjoy a lunchtime classical concert for all ages presented by the Sitka Summer Music Festival. The Ying Quartet and cellist Zuill Bailey perform selections from Beethoven’s Kreutzer Quintet, the Schumann Cello Concerto, and Piatigorsky’s Paganini Variations. Included with admission
Polar Nights: Camp Stove Cook-off

7 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18

It can be difficult to cook a gourmet meal in the wilderness. With a single burner and an ultra-light pack, pre-packaged meals used to result in less than desirable dinners, but that’s changing. Watch backcountry experts flaunt their gastronomy skills and pick up some tips for your next trip. Do you have tricks for creating good eats in the middle of nowhere? Sign up for the camp stove cook-off and show us your signature wilderness dish. To register, email lgarrod@anchoragemuseum.org. Admission is half-priced as part of the museum's Polar Nights series each Friday.
61° Workshop: Explore

10:30 to 11 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 19

Experience the museum in a new way and take a closer look at the “On Ice” exhibition. Recommended for families with children ages 6 to 12, and their caregivers. Limit on participants per session. First come, first served. Included with admission
History Bites: Historically Inspired Cuisine

5 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 20

Enjoy a three-course dining experience in Muse with a historically inspired menu, locally sourced ingredients, and an exploration of food culture, gardening, and subsistence in Cook Inlet. Local food and harvest have been central to Alaskans' physical and spiritual well-being throughout history and continue to be vital practices today. Learn about the historical connections of the food on your plate and how it relates to local cultures and sustainability today. Register online $60. Members $50
Spark!Nite

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 25

Anchorage Museum is partnering with the Midnight Sun Brewing Company to present Spark!Nite, a hands-on evening highlighting local innovation and inventive possibilities. Discover the many innovative aspects of their beer, from conception to marketing, and enjoy samples. Express your own inventive creativity through Spark!Lab activities. Held in conjunction with the ongoing exhibition space Spark!Lab Smithsonian. Ages 21 and older. Included with admission
Museum Day Live!

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26

Visit the Anchorage Museum for free as a part of Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day Live! Visitors can download Museum Day Live! tickets at smithsonianmag.com/museumday/tickets. Free admission with tickets, limited to two people per household.

OCTOBER EVENTS


Discovery Center Science Demonstrations

3 p.m., 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday Oct. 1-31

Meet the Anchorage Museum’s reptiles and marine animals, explore the hidden layers in candy and learn how to create a static charge. These science experiences intrigue and amuse. Demonstrations vary. Science demonstrations: 3 p.m. daily. Animal demonstrations: 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. daily. Included with admission
Light: Beyond the Bulb Exhibit

Tuesday through Sunday, Oct. 1-Dec. 31

This open-source international exhibit showcases the incredible variety of light-based science being researched today across the electromagnetic spectrum, across scientific disciplines, and across technological platforms. The exhibit materials and images were crowd-sourced and curated by experts for science content, beauty and ability to engage wide audiences. The images are displayed in the Anchorage Museum's Discovery Center. Included with admission
Smithsonian Spotlight: Shamanic Art of the Tlingit

7 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 1

Tlingit artist Benjamin Schleifman discusses his experiences making shamanic art and the ceremonies required to produce it. The Smithsonian Spotlight lecture series features Alaska Native artists, scholars and researchers on the first Thursday of each month. Hosted by the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum. Included with admission

61° Workshop: Blink

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, Oct. 1-30

Preschoolers and toddlers get creative, experiment and play with a variety of hands-on activities and demonstrations. New themes and ways to explore the museum each week. Part of the museum's Blink series which introduces children 5 and younger and their families to a range of activities, including open-ended play, hands-on workshops, literacy and storytelling, art, and science. Included with admission
Conservator's Corner

2 to 4 p.m. Fridays, Oct. 2–30

Get a behind-the scenes look at an Anchorage Museum conservator in action. Ask questions while the conservator repairs and preserves cultural and historical objects at a mobile conservation station, and learn how a conservator applies knowledge of materials and scientific methods to care for the museum's collection. Included with admission
Ikebana Demonstration

7 to 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2

The Anchorage Museum and the Ikenobo Ikebana Society of Anchorage present a demonstration of Ikebana — the Japanese art of flower arrangement that uses minimalist, balanced presentations — by award-winning Professor Masayo Takenouchi. Free
Battle of the Breweries

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2

The battle of the browns! Join us for beer flights in Muse restaurant on First Friday. October’s selections are brown ales featuring Midnight Sun Kodiak Brown, Kassik’s Nut Brown and Kenai Brewing Company Nut Brown. Flights are $5. Ages 21 and older
The Future of Fiction

7 to 9 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4

Alaska State Writer Laureate Frank Soos joins authors Justin Herrmann, Eowyn Ivey, and Deb Vanasse for a conversation about the Future of Fiction. In the New York Times Book Review, Tom Perrotta wrote that “a number of talented novelists have experienced a sudden and alarming loss of faith in their chosen literary form.” What is the value of fiction? Have the conventions of fiction worn themselves out? Is nonfiction more honest and accurate and a better form for this time? This discussion and book signing is presented by 49 Writers and the Anchorage Museum. Free
Evening for Educators: Van Gogh Alive

5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 8

Learn about museum resources, exhibitions, and collections. Gain field trip brainstorming and tools to guide your museum learning experience. Learn about the "Van Gogh Alive – The Experience" opening Oct. 9. Open to teachers, school librarians, and administration. Free. Register online https://www.anchoragemuseum.org/learn/school-programs/.
Voices from Cedar: Carved Whistles and Rattles of Southeast Alaska

1 to 3 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Oct. 8-9

Whistles, rattles, and clappers summon spirits and echo their voices during the dances and ceremonies of Southeast Alaska. Carved from red or yellow cedar, these traditional instruments blend distinctive musical sounds with complex, beautiful forms. Master carvers John Hudson (Tsimshian), Norman Jackson (Tlingit), and Donald Varnell (Haida) demonstrate how these instruments are made and share knowledge of their cultural meanings during the Voices from Cedar artists’ residency at the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. The program is sponsored by the Surdna Foundation, The CIRI Foundation, and Smithsonian Council for Arctic Studies. Included with admission
Polar Nights

6 to 9 p.m. Fridays, Oct. 9 -30

This Friday night series enlivens our nights through activities centering around art, culture, the environment, and the way Northern urbanites gather and meet. Part of the Anchorage Museum’s Polar Lab, a series of programs exploring life in the North. Selected galleries and spaces are open late every Friday, and general admission is half the usual price.

Oct. 9 An Evening with Van Gogh and Pink Floyd: The Wall

Oct. 16 Science Night in the Discovery Center

Oct. 23 Outsiders: Things Lost and Found/Pack Hacks and Led Zeppelin's Cosmic Light Show

Oct. 30 Film Screening: The Gold Rush
Polar Nights First Friday: An Evening with Van Gogh

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 9

Join us for the opening of the “Van Gogh Alive – The Experience.” Be prepared for a vibrant symphony of light, color and sound, combined and amplified to create an unforgettable multi-sensory experience. Food and drink will be provided. Included with admission to “Van Gogh Alive.” $12-$20
61° Workshop: Blink

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 10

Imagine, build and play during this open gathering for ages 2 to 5 years old and their caregivers. This session features “Imagination Playground,” an innovative play system that allows for creativity and promotes collaboration and communication through child-directed play. Part of the museum's Blink series which introduces children 5 and younger and their caregivers to a range of activities, including open-ended play, hands-on workshops, literacy and storytelling, art, and science. Included with admission
Art Lab

1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 10

Think, create and compose during this open gathering for all ages. Explore new materials and processes. Each session will have a theme and suggested uses of materials, or you are welcome to make your own creation with available materials in this open-ended art studio. Included with admission
Harvest: Quyurciq and other films

2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11

Documentary shorts about Alaska Natives, including "Harvest: Quyurciq" featuring Peter Paul Kawagaelg Williams (Yup'ik) of Sitka. Other films are "A Way of Making Life Beautiful: Yup'ik Art Between Two Worlds," "Trapping at 15 Below," and "The Story of NANANordic." A question and answer session with Williams after the film screenings. Included with admission
Monthly Wine Tasting

5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15

Featuring sauvignon blanc, merlot and a red blend from Whitehall Lane Winery. Part of the monthly wine tastings in Muse restaurant. $7 per glass and $16 per flight. Ages 21 and older
Polar Nights: Science Night in the Discovery Center

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 16

Join us for demonstrations and activities in the Discovery Center. Meet animals in the museum's living collection as we investigate the natural history, biology, and commerce of turtles. Also enjoy the program Light and Color, with lasers, black lights, beads and mirrors, explore some of the often overlooked but essential behaviors of light. Admission is half-priced as part of the museum's Polar Nights series each Friday. Please note: During free and reduced-admission events, fees still apply for premium exhibitions and planetarium shows.

Wells Fargo Free Day: Alaska Day

1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 18

Celebrate all things Alaska. Innovate and invent in Spark!Lab with Alaska-inspired activities. Take a tour of the Alaska Gallery with a docent. Try your hand at Alaska trivia to win a prize. Get creative in Art Lab with Alaska-themed materials. Free admission thanks to Wells Fargo. Please note: During free and reduced-admission events, fees still apply for premium exhibitions and planetarium shows.
Polar Nights: Pack Hacks/Things Lost and Found

6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23

Things Lost and Found: An item lost on the trail can range from a small inconvenience to a life-threatening situation. Whether it's a jacket or your mind, we've all cursed the gods of lost goods. But what's lost may not always be gone, and what's found can be just as interesting. Hear from Alaska wilderness adventurers and share your own stories. Pack Hacks: How do you pack for an epic trek? Get tips and tricks from local experts on how to pack before you head out. Pack Hacks will be on display before and after Things Lost and Found. Admission is half-priced as part of the museum's Polar Nights series each Friday. Please note: During free and reduced-admission events, fees still apply for premium exhibitions and planetarium shows.
Home Field Advantage: Baseball Card Show

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24 and noon to 5 pm. Sunday, Oct. 25

Fans are invited to buy and trade sports cards and other memorabilia. Held in conjunction with the exhibition "Home Field Advantage: Baseball in the Far North." Presented in partnership with Bosco's. Free. Please note: During free events, fees still apply for premium exhibitions and planetarium shows.
Bead Arts Gala

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24 and noon to 5 pm. Sunday, Oct. 25

Meet more than 40 bead artists from across Alaska and shop their exquisite work. This year’s Alaska Bead Society featured artist is Vicki Potter, whose work is influenced by the natural beauty of gemstones and pearls. Activities include bead-making demonstrations. Museum members receive a 10 percent discount on purchases. Free. Please note: During free events, fees still apply for premium exhibitions and planetarium shows.
STEM Mentoring Café

6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 27

Middle-school students and teachers engage with STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) professionals for a series of quick discussion of STEM careers. The event invites students to work with STEM professionals who are engaged as mentors during the 2015-16 school year. Sponsored in partnership with the Department of Energy, Association of Science Technology Centers, the National Girls Collaborative Project, HUD, and the Department of Education. Teachers and STEM professionals can register online: http://www.ngcproject.org/stem-mentoring-cafe-alaska.
Gold Rush

7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 30

Charlie Chaplin claimed that of all his films, he wanted most to be remembered for "The Gold Rush." Join us for a screening of this classic film and see Chaplin’s Lone Prospector seek his fame in the Klondike Gold Rush. Admission is half-priced as part of the museum's Polar Nights series each Friday. Please note: During free and reduced-admission events, fees still apply for premium exhibitions and planetarium shows.

61° Workshop: Explore

10:30 to 11 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 31

Interact with the “spirits” of the past in the Alaska Gallery. Pan for gold with an old sourdough, help with chores from 1915, and more. Recommended for families with children ages 6-12. Limited participants per session. First come, first served. Included with admission


THOMAS PLANETARIUM: SEPTEMBER

The following schedule is valid Sept. 1-30. Prices vary from $4 to $6 and do not include museum general admission (unless otherwise noted). Learn more and buy tickets at www.anchoragemuseum.org. Fees still apply for planetarium shows during free events.


Exploring New Horizons

4 p.m. daily

Starting from ancient times, learn about the history of planetary discovery, especially that of Pluto, and how it has led to an amazing mission to explore the Kuiper Belt. Explore the New Horizons spacecraft, its mission to dwarf planet Pluto, and how the scientific method applies to our understanding of the Solar System.
Living in the Age of Airplanes

5 p.m. daily

Watch a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all seven continents, “Living in the Age of Airplanes” renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world. The film is produced and directed by Brian J. Terwilliger (One Six Right), narrated by Harrison Ford, and features an original score by Academy Award-winning composer James Horner.
Exoplanets

10:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Go planet hunting outside our solar system. Visit gas giants in a deadly dance with their host stars, frozen rogue planets hurling through space, and new planets drifting within the Goldilocks Zone, an area where scientists believe Earth-like worlds may exist.
Flight Adventures

11:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday



This multi-media show from the Children's Museum of Indianapolis introduces children and families to the science, technology, and history of flight. The show features NASA’s research and advancements that have made space travel possible, along with the important role that engineering models have played in flight development.
Light: Beyond the Bulb and Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014

12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

Light: Beyond the Bulb celebrates the many forms of light and helps us to understand the world we inhabit and the universe we live in, and is part of our exhibit located in the Discovery Center. Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014 celebrates the international photography competition and showcases winning images from last year’s competition. These two shows are included with museum admission.

Back to the Moon for Good

1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday



Immerse yourself in a race to the Moon 40 years after the historic Apollo landings. Learn about the history of lunar exploration, and the Moon’s resources. Discover what humanity’s future on the Moon might hold. See how a competition among privately funded international teams is ushering in a new era of lunar exploration. Narrated by Tim Allen, Back to the Moon for Good presents the Google Lunar XPRIZE, and the personal stories of competition and collaboration it inspires. 
Sunstruck

2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

Discover the wonders of our sun. Its incredible energy has supported life on earth for millennia, but is now threatening our technology and way of life. Travel to the distant future to discover our sun’s connection to the universe’s cosmic cycle of life and death.
Cosmic Castaways

3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

There are places where the night sky has no constellations. No Orion, no Big Dipper, nothing but a few lonely, far away stars and a few faint, ghostly patches of light. Most stars lie within the crowded boundaries of galaxies, travelling with their brothers and sisters in a vast galactic family. But some find themselves on their own, deep within voids between the galaxies. These are the cosmic castaways.
Polar Opposites

6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 4

The Big Dipper, Orion’s Belt and the Andromeda Galaxy are a few of the many celestial wonders you can examine during Alaska’s dark winters. But have you ever wondered what people across the equator see as they peer into the night sky? Join us as we travel to 61 degrees South in this live show to explore the age old debate of whether stargazing is better from the Northern or Southern hemisphere. Part of First Friday activities.
Pink Floyd: Wish You Were Here

7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 11

Lose yourself in Pink Floyd’s classic album “Wish You Were Here.” This new full-dome music and light show interprets the acclaimed rock album through mesmerizing HD graphics. This is not a laser show, but the next generation of computer generated imagery. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Tickets are half-priced as part of the museum's Friday night series Polar Nights. $5
Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon

7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 25

Immerse yourself in Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon.” This new full-dome music and light show expands on the classic album through captivating HD graphics. Not a typical laser show, but the next generation of computer generated imagery. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Tickets are half-priced as part of the museum's Friday night series Polar Nights. $5


THOMAS PLANETARIUM: OCTOBER

The following schedule is valid Oct. 1-31. Prices vary from $4 to $6 and do not include museum general admission (unless otherwise noted). Learn more and buy tickets at www.anchoragemuseum.org. Fees still apply for planetarium shows during free events.


Exploring New Horizons

4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday

Starting from ancient times, learn about the history of planetary discovery, especially that of Pluto, and how it has led to an amazing mission to explore the Kuiper Belt. Explore the New Horizons spacecraft, its mission to dwarf planet Pluto, and how the scientific method applies to our understanding of the Solar System.
Living in the Age of Airplanes

5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday

Watch a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all seven continents, “Living in the Age of Airplanes” renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world. The film is produced and directed by Brian J. Terwilliger (One Six Right), narrated by Harrison Ford, and features an original score by Academy Award-winning composer James Horner.
Exoplanets

10:30 a.m. Saturday

Go planet hunting outside our solar system. Visit gas giants in a deadly dance with their host stars, frozen rogue planets hurling through space, and new planets drifting within the Goldilocks Zone, an area where scientists believe Earth-like worlds may exist.
Flight Adventures

11:30 a.m. Saturday



This multi-media show from the Children's Museum of Indianapolis introduces children and families to the science, technology, and history of flight. The show features NASA’s research and advancements that have made space travel possible, along with the important role that engineering models have played in flight development.
Light: Beyond the Bulb & Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014

12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

Light: Beyond the Bulb celebrates the many forms of light and helps us to understand the world we inhabit and the universe we live in, and is part of our exhibit located in the Discovery Center. Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014 celebrates the international photography competition and showcases winning images from last year’s competition. Included with admission
Back to the Moon for Good

1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday



Immerse yourself in a race to the Moon 40 years after the historic Apollo landings. Learn about the history of lunar exploration, and the Moon’s resources. Discover what humanity’s future on the Moon might hold. See how a competition among privately funded international teams is ushering in a new era of lunar exploration. Narrated by Tim Allen, Back to the Moon for Good presents the Google Lunar XPRIZE, and the personal stories of competition and collaboration it inspires. 

Sunstruck

2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

Discover the wonders of our sun. Its incredible energy has supported life on earth for millennia, but is now threatening our technology and way of life. Travel to the distant future to discover our sun’s connection to the universe’s cosmic cycle of life and death.
Cosmic Castaways

3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

There are places where the night sky has no constellations. No Orion, no Big Dipper, nothing but a few lonely, far away stars and a few faint, ghostly patches of light. Most stars lie within the crowded boundaries of galaxies, travelling with their brothers and sisters in a vast galactic family. But some find themselves on their own, deep within voids between the galaxies. These are the cosmic castaways.
Polar Opposites

6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2

The Big Dipper, Orion’s Belt and the Andromeda Galaxy are just a few of the many celestial wonders you can examine during Alaska’s dark winters. But have you ever wondered what people across the equator see as they peer into the night sky? Join us as we travel to 61 degrees South in this live show to explore the age old debate of whether stargazing is better from the Northern or Southern hemisphere. Part of the First Friday activities.


Pink Floyd: The Wall

7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 9

Lose yourself in Pink Floyd’s rock ‘n’ roll masterpiece “The Wall.” This full-dome music and light show interprets this classic album through mesmerizing HD

graphics. This is not a laser show, but the next generation of computer generated imagery. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Tickets are half-priced as part of the museum's Friday night series Polar Nights. $5


Led Zeppelin's Cosmic Light Show

7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23

Be transported by mood-altering art and 3-D graphics choreographed to Led Zeppelin’s biggest hits, including “Whole Lotta Love,” “Immigrant Song” and “Ramble On.” This immersive experience plays out on the museum's full-dome planetarium screen in concert with a state-of-the-art sound system. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Tickets are half-priced as part of the museum's Friday night series Polar Nights. $5

CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS

The Anchorage Museum offers a variety of art classes. Find complete class listings and registration information at anchoragemuseum.org/learn.


Design Up Here: Digital Photography Boot Camp

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mondays, Sept. 14-Oct. 19

Photographer Carl Battreal teaches beginning photographers the fundamentals of photography and how to process images digitally. Master digital camera techniques and functions. Reservations required; enroll online. $50
Urban Interventions: Decked Out

1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 19

Design your own skateboard deck inspired by Alaska Native objects in the Anchorage Museum and Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. Artist Holly Nordlum leads this workshop in graphics and collage. Ages 13-18. Limited capacity. Registration required $50.

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

All exhibitions are included with museum admission unless otherwise noted.


Recent Acquisitions

On view Oct. 2, 2015 through Feb. 21, 2016

The Anchorage Museum's collections help fulfill its mission to connect people, expand perspectives, and encourage global dialogue about the North and its distinct environment. The museum has important collections of Alaska Native objects, historical and contemporary artwork, and objects that illustrate Alaska's history. Works by Alaska artists have been at the heart of the museum’s collections. The museum has a fine collection of art that provides a wide survey of what has been done in this state from the late 18th century to the most recent artistic endeavors. This exhibition offers a unique opportunity to view some of the newest additions to the museum’s extensive collection. It includes more than 100 of the acquisitions ranging from art, objects and archival materials.
Van Gogh Alive – The Experience

On view Oct. 9, 2015 through Jan. 10, 2016

Vincent Van Gogh’s works have been displayed and enjoyed around the world for more than a century — but never like this. Created by Grande Exhibitions, “Van Gogh Alive — The Experience” gives visitors the opportunity to not only view Van Gogh’s paintings, but to truly venture into his world. From the moment you enter, a powerful and vibrant symphony of light, color and sound compels you to leave your world behind and immerse yourself in his paintings — an experience that is simultaneously enchanting, entertaining and educational. Adults and children alike will forge their own paths and find their own meaning as they wander through the galleries, exploring hidden nooks, viewing artworks from new angles and discovering different perspectives. $12-$20
Living Alaska: A Decade of Collecting Art of Alaska Museums

On view Nov. 6, 2015 through Feb. 7, 2016

For more than a decade, the Rasmuson Foundation has been giving annual grants to Alaska’s museums to acquire contemporary art. This unique program has allowed museums throughout the state, to purposefully build their collections. In its first ten years, the Rasmuson Art Acquisition Fund distributed 173 grants to 33 museums to purchase works by 436 artists. “Living Alaska” shares the far-reaching impacts of the fund and a sample of the artwork it has preserved for the public. Curated by Sven Haakanson, Jr. and designed by the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, the exhibition contains 25 pieces loaned from 12 different museums.
100 Snapshots

On view Nov. 13, 2015 through Jan. 10, 2016

Glimpse into the daily lives of Anchorage residents during the last 100 years through the intimate lens of amateur snapshots. Held in conjunction with the Anchorage Centennial Celebration.
Our Story

On view Nov. 20, 2015 through Sept. 11, 2016

This multi-faceted exhibition features artwork from the Anchorage Museum collection and interviews of Alaska Native artists. Statement from guest curator Drew Michael: “As Alaska Native peoples we gather strength and are unified by sharing our own stories through words, art, and objects of the past. Until quite recently, Indigenous art was defined and described by non-indigenous people in museums, books, and galleries. This collection of artwork helps tell the story of what it means to be Alaska Native in a changing time, place, and perspective. Each object has a creator who has invested his or her life to expressing identity through art. As a child I was drawn to objects that represented my cultural heritage. I wanted to learn from the artists themselves, but did not have that opportunity. All of the work included in this exhibition is made by artists who have influenced me and my artistic career. We are on the path to protect and activate our culture. Please take time to hear the authentic story of what it means to be Alaska Native today.”

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

All exhibitions are included with museum admission unless otherwise noted.


Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage

On view through Sept. 7, 2015

It’s one of science’s hottest topics: Melting Arctic ice is revealing a Northwest Passage – the very thing Captain Cook sought but never found. Mostly celebrated for his explorations of the South Pacific, Captain James Cook also braved the frozen Arctic searching for a northern route to Asia. This exhibition focuses on his journeys in the northeast Pacific during 1778 and 1779. Artifacts, art and hands-on activities for families bring to life this exciting era in history – a time of bold discoveries made dangerous by uncharted waters, rocky coasts and unrelenting ice. The exhibition examines the legacies of Cook’s northern voyage, including changes to indigenous life. Displays delve into the intriguing issues at play in the North during Cook's expedition that are still relevant today, including different nations’ claims to the region and its resources. This exhibition is part of the Anchorage Museum’s Polar Lab and is an official program of the Anchorage Centennial.
City Limits

On view through Oct. 11, 2015

In 1915, President Woodrow Wilson authorized funds for the construction of the Alaska Railroad. A rough-and-tumble tent city quickly took root near the railroad’s hub at Ship Creek Landing. One hundred years later, Anchorage is a modern city that’s home to nearly 300,000 people. This 5,000-square-foot centennial exhibition will explain how Anchortown has grown and changed, highlighting major events in the city’s history including the 1964 Good Friday Earthquake, the introduction of army and air force bases, and the state’s oil boom. The exhibition will feature historical photographs, objects, films, oral histories and interactive stations for families. An official program of the Anchorage Centennial.
Home Field Advantage: Baseball in the Far North

On view through Nov. 1, 2015

On its first official Fourth of July celebration in 1915, Anchorage built a new baseball diamond amid a ramshackle tent city sprawled across the flats of Ship Creek. Baseball was becoming a national craze, and Alaskans made it distinctly their own. “Home Field Advantage” reveals how this national pastime adapted to arctic conditions. Archival photographs, art, artifacts and memorabilia showcase the rich history of baseball in Anchorage and throughout the state, including how late 19th century icebound whalers spread ashes on sea ice to form baseball diamonds. Visitors also learn about early Ketchikan teams, whose beach-based games were called due to high tide, and how some Major league players, including Satchel Paige, once played in the far North. This exhibition is an official program of the Anchorage Centennial Celebration.
On Ice

On view through Sept. 20, 2015

Formed from frozen seawater exposed to periods of enduring cold, sea ice is a simple material with complex implications. Sea ice provides hunters and whalers with vital access to resources, it helps to moderate the world’s weather, and it is home to much of the microscopic life that supports some of the world’s most valuable fisheries. “On Ice” explores the historical role this material has played in the Arctic, presented through the perspectives of science, business, government and individuals whose lives and livelihoods are inextricably tied to its dynamic conditions. “On Ice” provides context for looking at the future of the North and how life here is ever changing for people, whales, walrus, plankton and more. This exhibition is part of the Anchorage Museum’s Polar Lab.
Florian Schulz: To the Arctic

On view through Nov. 1, 2015

Although the common perception of the Arctic is that it is a vast nothingness, Florian Schulz’s photographs reveal a world teeming with life amidst complex natural systems — systems that fuel our global economy and affect our health and environment. An award-winning wildlife photographer, Schulz photographs throughout the Circumpolar North, from Alaska to Canada, Greenland and Norway. To capture these images, he and his crew endure subfreezing temperatures, camping on ice sheets, diving beneath icebergs, and riding on dogsleds. His photographs reveal the vast scale of the Arctic plain, which is host to migrating birds from around the globe, as well as the yearly migration of thousands of caribou. They also expose how the loss of polar ice and snow is dramatically altering the fabric of Arctic life on land and sea. This exhibition is part of the Anchorage Museum’s Polar Lab.
Polar Night: Life and Light In the Dead of Night

On view through Oct. 4, 2015

Step into the dark, grab a penlight, and experience the wonder of polar night inside the museum. We’re breaking open the myth that polar night, the period of continued winter darkness near the Earth’s poles, is a time of inactivity within the Arctic ecosystem. Learn how the darkness of high Arctic winter is full of life thanks to recent scientific studies in the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard that reveal a thriving undersea ecosystem. This exhibition is organized in conjunction with the Tromsø University Museum.
VoxVan

On view through Nov. 30

In preparation for the Anchorage Centennial, the Anchorage Museum collaborated with Alaska Public Media in 2014 to create VoxVan, a video project that transformed a utility van into a mobile story-gathering unit to record the stories of those in our community. The van parked at a variety of locations, and a dedicated crew made video recordings of Anchorage residents answering the question: "What makes Anchorage home?" The resulting collection of stories, perspectives and histories represent a vibrant and multicultural Anchorage. The compilation of videos will be presented in a non-traditional exhibition at the Anchorage Museum during the Municipality of Anchorage's Centennial Celebration. As visitors ride the large museum elevator, they can meet their neighbors via VoxVan Project videos screened inside.
Spark!Lab

Now on view

Spark!Lab Smithsonian encourages kids and families to explore their inventive creativity - to create, innovate, collaborate and problem-solve - because these experiences empower kids to develop the skills and confidence they need to succeed today and in the future. Attached to the Discovery Center, Spark!Lab welcomes visitors to tinker, invent, conduct science experiments, and explore inventors' notebooks. Developed by the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History, Spark!Lab at the Anchorage Museum is made possible through the support of the Ford Motor Company Fund.

PARTNER PROGRAMS


Cook Inlet Historical Society

7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15

Guest Billye Chabot, executive director of Seward House Historic Museum in Auburn, N.Y., presents a lecture on William H. Seward, Secretary of State from 1861 to 1869 and the purchase of Alaska from Russia in 1867. The Seward House, W.H. Seward’s New York family residence, contains original furnishings, artwork, and personal belongings owned by the Seward family. This event is presented by the Cook Inlet Historical Society. Free


VISITOR INFORMATION AND MUSEUM HOURS

The Anchorage Museum’s mission is to connect people, expand perspectives, and encourage global dialogue about the North and its distinct environment.


SUMMER HOURS

Museum


May 1-Sept. 30

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily


Muse Restaurant

11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday through Saturday

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday
WINTER HOURS

Museum


Oct. 1 through April 30

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday

Noon to 6 p.m. Sunday

Closed Monday


Muse Restaurant

11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday

Noon to 6 p.m. Sunday

Closed Monday
Polar Nights

Special programming from 6 to 9 p.m. Fridays

Free or discounted museum admission
Museum Shop and Atrium Cafe

Open during museum hours


GENERAL ADMISSION

Free for museum members, $15 adults (18-64), $12 Alaska resident adults (18-64), $10 military/senior citizens/students, $7 ages 3 to 12, free ages 2 and younger. Visitors can find general museum information at (907) 929-9200 or www.anchoragemuseum.org.


Visitors with disabilities who need special assistance may call (907) 929-9254.
Parking is available for $1 per hour in the underground garage on evenings and weekends.
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