Space shuttle contingency functional



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15 February 2003




APPENDIX 1 TO ANNEX F TO DDMS FUNCPLAN 3610-03


PUBLIC AFFAIRS GUIDANCE FOR DOD ALS/ELS LANDING
1. Situation.
a. General. In the event of a contingency landing at a DOD augmented or emergency landing site (ALS/ELS), a designated PA representative (normally the PA at the landing site) will maintain direct coordination with the installation commander and will serve as spokesperson to the media and the public on DOD related support only until the NASA/PAO arrives with the Rapid Response Team (RRT). If there is no PA representative at the landing site, then the installation commander or on-scene commander (OSC) or his/her designated representative will maintain direct liaison with DDMS-P in the SOC and will use the questions/answers guidelines provided in paragraph 2.a.(3).
2. Execution.
a. Tasks.
(1) Upon arrival of the NASA RRT, the designated NASA/PAO will take over as spokesperson concerning the orbiter and crew. Specific DOD related questions will be referred to the DDMS-P representative (if on-site), installation commander, or OSC as appropriate. Access to the orbiter will be dictated by the restrictions of safety and security as determined by the NASA Ground Operations Manager (GOM).
(2) In all cases, inquiries of a political nature will be referred to the appropriate US Embassy (State Department) diplomatic post.
(3) The following responses to queries (RTQs) are provided if the Space Shuttle experiences difficulties. These responses may be used by PAOs and other appropriate mission personnel on an “if asked” basis:
Q1. We understand the shuttle is experiencing some difficulties and preparing to try to land at (location)? Can you fill in the details for us?
A1. The Space Shuttle _____________ [list exact name, e.g., Columbia, Discovery, Atlantis, Endeavor] is scheduled for landing at one of the two primary landing sites in the United States (Kennedy Space Center, Florida, or Edwards AFB, California). It is extremely unlikely that the orbiter will have to land outside the United States; however, all eventualities have to be planned no matter how remote the chance. Accordingly, ground crews in (or at) _________________ [list the appropriate ALS/ELS, TAL site location: Edwards AFB, CA, or White Sands Space Harbor, New Mexico, in the United States and overseas: Moron AB, Spain; Zaragoza AB, Spain; or Ben Guerir, Morocco] have received special training from NASA and DOD personnel on how to handle an orbiter emergency landing.
Q2. If the orbiter is forced to land at one of the four transoceanic abort landing sites, will the media be allowed to take pictures during the emergency landing?
A2. Subject to host nation sensitivities and safety concerns, photographers will be allowed to take pictures of the orbiter landing. However, once on the ground, the orbiter must not be approached by any untrained personnel, until fuel and oxidizers are removed, since there is a serious safety hazard involved. In case of an actual landing, release of further details will be provided to the authorities at (appropriate ELS/ALS, TAL site location) through NASA JSC MCC PAO.
b. Coordinating Instructions.
(1) Coordinating the Release of Information. The following are the types/categories of information that can be released. All news releases and media inquiries must be approved by the NASA/PAO and in coordination with the on-site commander (OSC). The NASA/PAO representative should arrive with the RRT within 24 hours.
(a) Name of orbiter involved. (Columbia, Discovery, Atlantis, Endeavor).
(b) Type of landing. (i.e., end-of-mission, emergency, etc. to include specific ELS/ALS and country if applicable).
(c) Make up of DOD Support/Contingency crews to include: on-site commander (OSC), Ground Operations Manager (GOM), flight operations, flight line crew, safety, communications, medical, search and rescue (SAR) crews (i.e., aircrews, aircraft and surface ships). Level of response of all of these personnel and crews. Additionally, the contribution of any host country contingency crew in support of DOD crews can also be released assuming the country does not object.
(d) Specific location of astronauts (e.g., flight line, hospital, assisting ground crews in securing orbiter, en route to other facilities, etc.) [NOTE: Astronaut condition (i.e., physical and mental health) will be released ONLY by the NASA/PAO (normally the person who arrives with the RRT)].
(e) Whether normal base operations have resumed. (Specific site location and country should be acknowledged).
(f) Further statements will be issued as soon as information is available from NASA JSC MCC PAO. (This will be done in coordination with the NASA/PAO on site.)
(g) Astronaut interviews may be possible; if so they will be scheduled later by NASA.

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

MANNED SPACE FLIGHT SUPPORT OFFICE

Patrick AFB FL 32925-3239

15 February 2003




APPENDIX 2 TO ANNEX F TO DDMS FUNCPLAN 3610-03


PUBLIC AFFAIRS GUIDANCE FOR FERRY FLIGHT MISSIONS
1. Situation.
a. General. NASA conducts Space Shuttle ferry flight missions and retains full and total responsibility for PA activities related to the mission. The DOD provides operational support and service to the shuttle carrier aircraft (SCA), a specially equipped Boeing 747, at bases between the Space Shuttle landing and launch sites.
2. Execution. Concept of Operations:


  1. In all cases, matters involving NASA assets (e.g., the orbiter and SCA) remain the sole responsibility of the NASA/PAO representative. Public announcements of ferry flight schedules will not typically be made in advance of departure, and arrangements will not be made for public viewing at SCA refueling sites.




  1. DDMS-CC, DOD Manager/PA, AFSPC/PA, and DDMS-P will be informed through the DDMS Ferry Project Officer of all media events during refueling stopover for the SCA, or for an overnight stopover during a ferry flight mission.




  1. Problems/concerns involving public affairs while the orbiter/SCA is at the stopover base will be resolved by consultation between the base PAO, DDMS Ferry Project Officer, and the NASA/PAO representative. DOD Manager/PA, AFSPC-PA, and DDMS-P will be informed.




  1. Where additional guidelines are required for a specific mission, NASA/PAO representative will provide guidance through DDMS-CC, to all responsible participants.

(INTENTIONALLY BLANK)


DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

MANNED SPACE FLIGHT SUPPORT OFFICE


Patrick AFB FL 32925-3239

15 February 2003




APPENDIX 3 TO ANNEX F TO DDMS FUNCPLAN 3610-03


SAMPLE CONTINGENCY PA PLAN FOR DOD LANDING SITES

*** THIS APPENDIX IS UNDER DEVELOPMENT ***

(INTENTIONALLY BLANK)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

MANNED SPACE FLIGHT SUPPORT OFFICE

Patrick AFB FL 32925-3239

15 February 2003



ANNEX H TO DDMS CONTINGENCY FUNCPLAN 3610-03

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES




REFERENCES:

a. Meteorological Support Memorandum of Understanding (METMOU),

1 Jun 88











b. Air Force Instruction 15-118, Requesting Specialized Weather Support, 28 February 1994










c. Space Shuttle Program Requirements Documents (PRD) No. 2000










d. Space Shuttle Operational Flight Rules, JSC-NSTS-12820, Vol A September 1998, Vol B November 1998, Vol C November 1998










e. Air Force Manual 15-111, Surface Weather Observations,

1 November 1998












f. AFTOX Chemical Dispersion Model Computer Program, November 1980

1. General. DOD resources support NASA in conducting the operational mission of the Space Shuttle. Reference a. describes the support relationships among different governmental agencies supplying environmental support for the Space Shuttle Program. The 45th Weather Squadron Commander serves as the DDMS Assistant for Meteorology (DDMS-W) and manages DOD weather support for shuttle operations. This annex provides specific instructions to DOD meteorological units providing contingency support to the Space Shuttle. The PRD tasks organizations that are part of a national range for overall support.


2. Concept of Operation.
a. Support Concepts. The philosophy of a total United States Government environmental support system applies. This system [including the resources of Army, Navy, Air Force, and the National Weather Service (NWS)] collaborates with NASA to provide decision assistance using a mix of locally and centrally produced products. A single source of mission planning and control forecasts forms the baseline to satisfy mission requirements. The system endeavors to avoid duplication of effort. Units do not modify weather information provided by other agencies without coordinating those changes with the issuing agency.
b. Support System. The launch site and each landing site, as well as centralized facilities, provide inputs through the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS), the Automated Weather Network (AWN), the Advanced Weather Information Processing System (AWIPS), and similar meteorological data systems. In addition, the launch site, Transoceanic Abort Landing (TAL) sites, and End-Of-Mission (EOM) landing sites have direct voice communication with the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), a NWS organization at Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas.
c. Support Interfaces.
(1) The 45th Weather Squadron's Range Weather Operations (RWO) Flight, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida, serves as the meteorological support center for Kennedy Space Center (KSC) ground and launch operations. In addition, a Launch Weather Officer (LWO) provides weather forecast support to the Mission Management Team, KSC, Florida, the 45 SW Command Staff, CCAFS, and the DOD Support Operations Center (SOC), Patrick AFB, FL.
(2) SMG serves as the meteorological support center for flight and landing operations. SMG provides weather forecast support to the astronaut crew, the Mission Control Center (MCC), the Day of Launch I-Loads Update (DOLILU) Operations Support System (DOSS) and the Mission Management Team (MMT) at JSC.
(3) Meteorological support centers maintain direct coordination with each other throughout the mission during launch and contingency landing support.
d. Data Base.
(1) The primary database for shuttle weather products is the MIDDS network. Units that do not have MIDDS systems transmit their weather data using their normal communications network. The MIDDS system intercepts this weather data through various data links.
(2) SMG is responsible to the JSC MCC for the validity of weather forecasts and advisories presented to the astronaut crew, the Flight Director, other flight controllers in the MCC, and the Mission Management Team. SMG makes the official shuttle landing forecast. The SMG issues an FXXX01 KHOU bulletin containing the official shuttle landing forecasts for each TAL site, abort-once-around (AOA) site, return to launch site (RTLS), first day primary landing site (PLS), on-orbit PLS, and EOM.
e. Communications. The primary media is the MIDDS or AWN system, with inputs from civilian meteorological networks, as necessary. NASA establishes separate communications for the upper air observing system system between the TAL site and SMG. TAL weather personnel call SMG via International Maritime Satellite (INMARSAT) communications or telephone to discuss mission critical weather problems.
3. Tasks and Responsibilities.
a. 45th Weather Squadron, Patrick AFB, FL:
(1) Appoints a weather operations officer who:
(a) Ensures that a weather officer or experienced weather forecaster participates with the RWO Launch Weather Team for shuttle operations from L-7 hours through launch and during the on-orbit phase when requested.
(b) Serves as liaison between the SOC and centralized production and field weather units.
(c) Manages TAL weather support--ensures TAL Atmospheric Sounding System (TASS) equipment is operational and supplies are available; coordinates TAL manning; maintains current written procedures; ensures personnel receive shuttle-unique training; coordinates PRD requirements (reference c.).
(d) Serves as a member of the NASA Deployed Operations Team (DOT) and as Officer in Charge (OIC) of contingency weather support for ground operations if the orbiter lands at a site other than EOM, RTLS or AOA.
(2) 45th Weather Squadron does task other AFSPC units and AFTAC to provide one forecaster which provides routine weather support for the TAL site at Ben Guerir, Morocco, to serve as TASS operator or an experienced forecaster, grade E-5 or above, to serve as Weather Point of Contact (WPOC).
(3) Provides meteorological support as identified in the appropriate Universal Documentation System (UDS) publications.
(4) Provides Sea and Air Rescue Forecast (SARF) support as outlined in Appendix 1.
(5) Provides Shuttle Ferry Flight (SFF) support, to include the in-flight weather system, as outlined in Appendix 2.
b. 412th Operations Support Squadron Weather Flight, Edwards Air Force Base, CA:
(1) Initiates 24-hour observation at L-24 hours through EOM as specified in appropriate UDS publications.
(2) Provides meteorological support as identified in the appropriate UDS publications and as outlined in Appendix 3.
(3) Provides tasked SFF support as outlined in Appendix 2.
c. Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory, White Sands Meteorological Team, White Sands Missile Range [when White Sands Space Harbor (WSSH) serves as an EOM or augmented landing site]:
(1) Initiates surface observations only at Ld-8 hours through EOM pending Ld-24 hours notification of support needed.
(2) Provides meteorological support as identified in appropriate UDS publications.
(3) Initiates coordination with the SMG and DDMS-W, as required.
(4) Provides contingency ground operations support as identified in Appendix 3 if the orbiter lands at WSSH.
d. Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), Offutt Air Force Base, NE:
(1) Produces upper air point display model-based forecasts providing launch condition vertical wind profiles upon request.
(2) Produce specialized forecasts for remote area rescue missions in the form of alpha-numeric bulletins available over the automated weather network and the AFWA homepage, AFWIN.
(3) Produce Support Assistance Requests for SFF, when required, to include a CONUS

-9°C chart.


e. The Naval European Meteorology and Oceanography Center, NS Rota, Spain, provides support at the TAL site at Moron AB, Spain, as follows:
(1) Coordinates TAL weather support training with DDMS-W.
(2) Provides one experienced forecaster, grade E-5 or above, to serve as WPOC.
(3) Provides one trained RATS operator.
(4) Provides two weather observers to support 24-hour operations.
(5) Provides weather support as outlined in Appendices 3 and 4 of this annex.
(6) Develops plans to deploy personnel within 72 hours to support ground operations if an orbiter lands in the European theater or Africa. Tasks one forecaster and one observer to help support 24 hour operations at the Spanish and African TAL sites. Personnel deployed to other TAL sites may temporarily redeploy to the TAL site supporting post shuttle landing ground operations.
(7) Identifies manning shortfalls as soon as possible to DDMS-W.
f. The U.S. Air Forces Europe Operational Weather Squadron (USAFE OWS) provides support for the TAL site at Zaragoza AB, Spain, as follows:
(1) Coordinates TAL weather support training with DDMS-W.
(2) Provides an experienced forecaster, E-5 or above, as WPOC.
(3) Provides one trained TASS operator.
(4) Provides two weather observers to support 24 hour operations (for Zaragoza AB only).
(5) Provides weather support as outlined in Appendices 3 and 4 of this annex.
(6) Develops plans to deploy equipment and personnel within 72 hours to support ground operations if an orbiter lands in the European theater or Africa. Tasks two forecasters, two observers, and equipment to support 24 hour operations at the Spanish and African TAL sites. Personnel deployed to other TAL sites may temporarily redeploy to the TAL site supporting post shuttle landing ground operations.
(7) Identifies manning shortfalls as soon as possible to DDMS-W.
g. The 45th Weather Squadron, Patrick AFB, FL, and the 21st Operations Support Squadron, Peterson AFB, CO, each provide one forecaster to provide routine weather support for the TAL site at Ben Guerir, Morocco as follows:
(1) Coordinates TAL weather support training with DDMS-W.
(2) Provides one forecaster to serve as TASS operator or an experienced forecaster, grade E-5 or above, to serve as WPOC.
(3) Provides weather support as outlined in Appendices 3 and 4 of this annex.
(4) Prepares to redeploy TAL weather support personnel to the shuttle landing site until relieved by USAFE weather personnel. Required only if the shuttle lands at a TAL site.
(5) Identifies manning shortfalls as soon as possible to DDMS-W.
h. Naval Atlantic Meteorological and Oceanographic Center, Norfolk, Virginia, provides sea state forecast guidance as required by RWO using existing products for launch and recovery operations and to support the SARF. Sea state parameters include wind speed and direction, significant wave height, primary wave direction, primary wave period, and sea surface temperature. See Appendix 1.
i. Weather Units at DOD Emergency Landing Sites (ELSs)--See Appendix 1 to Annex C:
(1) Provide forecasts and observations from existing in-place resources to support an emergency landing of an orbiter as normally provided for any aircraft emergency.
(2) Upon declaration of an emergency deorbit, use AFTOX software to compute toxic corridors based on current and forecast weather conditions and the worst case scenario described below. Pass toxic corridors to the on-scene commander (OSC). If a spill occurs, provide OSC continuous updates of the toxic corridor using current weather observations.


Release type

Continuous

Chemical

Nitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4)

Hgt of leak above ground

30 ft

Emission rate through rupture

80 lbs/min

Chemical still leaking

Yes

Spill area

800 sq ft (only if AFTOX requests)

Concentration averaging time

15 min

Default hgt of interest

6 ft

(3) Provide forecasts, observations, and metwatch support as directed, post-landing, by on-scene officials and as identified in Appendices 2 and 3.


(4) If the shuttle lands at an ELS, the DDMS weather operations officer deploys to arrange initial support and act as liaison to NASA.
j. Air Force Weather Agency provides solar observations to the Space Environment Center, Boulder, CO, and also provides backup solar reports directly to NASA if SEC communications fail.

NEIL R. WYSE

JAMES O. ELLIS, JR.

Colonel, USAF

Admiral, USN

DOD Manager's Assistant

DOD Manager,

for Meteorology

Manned Space Flight Support Operations

Appendices:


1. Sea and Air Rescue Forecast (SARF)

2. Shuttle Ferry Flight (SFF) Weather Operations

3. Forecast and Observing Support for Contingency Landings

4. Upper air observing system Operations


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