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Look Out! Natural Disasters!

4th Grade STEM Inquiry Unit

natural_disaster.jpg

Team #: 6

Jeremy Kirchgraber, Brittany Main, Robert McCabe

Fall 2014



Table of Contents


Lesson #

Title of Lesson

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Gardener’s Multiple Intelligences

Additives

Leader of Lesson

1

“Ladies and Gentlemen,

You love em, you hate em, you cannot live without em: Natural Disasters!



Definitions, Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Visual- Spatial, Interpersonal, Logical- Mathematical


Graphic organizer,

Bar Graph,

Smart board


Brittany Main

2

“It’s Gettin’ Hot in Here!”
Wildfires

Definitions. Knowledge. Comprehension. Analysis. Evaluation.

Logical- Mathematical, Visual- Spatial

Scavenger Hunt,

Smart board, 30 Laptops



Jeremy Kirchgraber

3

“I Lava Volcanoes!

Definitions, Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Visual- Spatial, Bodily- Kinesthetic

Smartboard, National Geographic Video, Model

Brittany Main

4

“Shake it up, baby now!”

by

The Earthquakes

Definitions, Knowledge, Comprehension, Analysis, Evaluation

Visual- Spatial, Bodily- Kinesthetic

Bar Graph, Model,

Smart board



Jeremy Kirchgraber

5

“Don’t go chasin’ Tsunamis

Comprehension

Knowledge, Evaluation



Logical, Visual- Spatial

Smart Board, Youtube

Video, Laptop



Robert McCabe

6

“What’s your Hurri-cane?”

Analysis, Evaluation,

and Creation





Interpersonal, Verbal- Linguistic, Visual- Spatial


Smartboard, Video, Laptop, Pie Graph

Robert McCabe

“Ladies and Gentlemen,

You love ‘em, you hate ‘em, you cannot live without ‘em:

Natural Disasters”

by Brittany Main



natural_disaster.jpg

Lesson Plan #1




Blooms Taxonomy: Definitions, Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation
Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences): Visual- Spatial, Logical- Mathematical
Children’s Literature: ( Teacher compiled from National Geographic Website)

Volcano


Earthquakes

Hurricanes

Wildfires: Dry, Hot, and Windy

Tsunami: Killer Waves


NYC Science Scope & Sequence
Inquiry Skills:

  1. Communicating – giving oral and written explanations or graphic representations

of observations

  1. Comparing and contrasting – identifying similarities and differences between or

among objects, events, data, systems, etc

  1. Gathering and organizing data – collecting information about objects and events

which illustrate a specific situation

  1. Interpreting data – analyzing data that have been obtained and organized by

determining apparent patterns or relationships in the data
Process Skills:

  1. PS 2. 1 e: .Investigate the negative and positive impact of extreme natural events on living things:

• Volcanoes

• Hurricanes

• Tornadoes

• Floods

• Fires

• Earthquakes


NCTM Math Skills

Process Standards:

Representation: Use representations to model and interpret physical, social, and mathematical phenomena



Communication:Communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others; Organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication
Content Standards:

Data Analysis and Probability- collect data using observations, surveys, and experiments;represent data using tables and graphs such as line plots, bar graphs, and line graphs; propose and justify conclusions and predictions that are based on data and design studies to further investigate the conclusions or predictions



ISTE NETs Standards for Literate Students

  1. Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions

  2. Research and information fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information


Behavioral Objective(s):

  1. To analyze a bar graph demonstrating the increase in occurrences of natural disasters between 1975 and 2010.

  2. To identify what is occurring during each of the five natural disasters covered.


Motivational/ Constructivist Activity:

Students will begin by completing a graphic organizer titled, “Human Response to Natural Disasters.” We will discuss this as a class after their independent completion.


Time Duration: 90 minutes


Procedures:

  1. Call on student to read the behavioral objectives for the class

  2. Ask students the following, “How do you define a disaster?” We will create a class definition.

  3. Ask the students the following, “What are some specific types of natural disasters?” We will create a class list. From the class list, I will place a star next to the following 5: tsunamis, forest fires, earthquakes, hurricanes and volcanoes. I will explain that these are the 5 natural disasters that we will be studying in this unit.

  4. Based on what was said about each disaster, and looking at the long class list, students will be asked to compare and contrast these five different natural disasters with a partner.

  5. I will distribute a handout with data I complied regarding natural disaster frequency between the years 1975 and 2010. They will take this data, and create a bar graph.

  6. Students will seperated into groups of 5- one group per natural disaster. Each group will be given a non- fiction article regarding that particular natural disaster. They will be given a worksheet that will ask them to explain what they learned about their natural disaster, and evaluate the extent to which that natural disaster impacted life.

  7. They will then stand at their seats and present their findings to the class.

Questions:

I).Closed-Ended Questions:

  1. How do you define a disaster?

A: A sudden event, such as an accident or a natural catastrophe, that causes great damage or loss of life

  1. What are some specific types of natural disasters?

A: Flood, fire, earthquake, tornado or twister, volcanic eruption, windstorm, mudslide

II). Open-Ended Questions:

  1. Although the “natural” in natural disasters imply that these events occur as a result of earth processes, is it possible that humans have a role in their occurrence? If so, how?

  2. What is the difference between “responding to” and “planning for” a Natural Disaster?


Materials:

  • Smartboard

  • “Natural disasters reported 1975- 2011 data and analysis questions

  • National Geographic Articles and corresponding questions (teacher made)

Assessment:

  1. Students will be assessed on their ability to graph data, and determine the trend in natural disasters reported between 1975 and 2010.

  2. Students will be assessed on their ability to synthesize information from National Geographic articles on one of the 5 natural disasters to be covered in this unit.


Assessment Rubric:

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Student

Target “3” “2” “1” Rating

Behavioral Objective #1: Bar Graph creation and Analysis

Students properly identified the various parts of the graph, i.e. title, axis names, time scale, geographic scale, and trend. Students were able to properly depict an increase in natural disasters between the years 1975 and 2000, no change between 2004 and 2005 and then a decrease between the years 2005 and 2010.

Students were not able to properly identified the various parts of the graph, i.e. title, axis names, time scale, geographic scale, and trend. Students were able to properly detect an increase in natural disasters between the years 1975 and 2000, no change between 2004 and 2005 and then a decrease between the years 2005 and 2010.


Students were neither able to properly identified the various parts of the graph, i.e. title, axis names, time scale, geographic scale, and trend, nor properly detect an increase in natural disasters between the years 1975 and 2000, no change between 2004 and 2005 and then a decrease between the years 2005 and 2010.






Behavioral Objective #2: Identify what is occurring during each of the five natural disasters covered.

Student can identify what is occurring during each of the five natural disasters covered.




Student can identify what is occurring during most of the five natural disasters covered.

Student can identify what is occurring during two or three of the five natural disasters covered.




Do Now: Graphic Organizer

Directions:Choose any one natural disaster and complete this organizer.






Graphic Organizer

Answer Key:

Disaster Type: Hurricane
What action can be taken at the government level…

Before the event: Government can be monitoring weather patterns and be actively looking for signs of hurricane formation.

During the event: Government can warn people of ways to stay safe until the hurricane passes.

After the event: Government can deploy the national guard to the disaster sites to provide the residents with food and shelter.
What action can be taken at the community level…

Before the event: Inform community members about the impending storm and how to be safe.

During the event: Allow neighbors to seek shelter in your home if their home is destroyed.

After the event: Food drives, coat drives and toy drives to gather supplies.
What action can be taken at the family and personal level…

Before the event: Assign family members different roles to help prepare for the storm. Stock up on food and water.

During the event: Stay together and wait for it to pass!

After the event: Work together to bring back the physical state of the home, and the mental state of the family.
Wondering: How many deaths have been caused by hurricanes in the history of the U.S.?

Name:

Date:

Natural Disaster data

Directions: Below is data compiled from EM- DAT: The International Disaster Database. You will be given a blank x and y axis for you to construct a bar graph. Once you create your graph, you will answer several questions about natural disasters. You will need to do some mathematical calculations!


Year

Number of Natural Disasters Reported

  1. 1975

80

  1. 1980

140

  1. 1985

190

  1. 1990

210

  1. 1995

300

  1. 2000

400

  1. 2005

400

  1. 2010

380


***Use the following legend when you create your graph- Year 2- 1975, Year 3- 1980, Year 4-1985, Year 5- 1990, Year 6- 1995, Year 7- 2000, Year 8- 2005, Year 9- 2010

1.What is the title of the graph? _________

2.What type of data is on the x axis? ________

3.What type of data is on the y axis? ______

4. What is the earliest date on the graph? ________________

5.What is the latest date on the graph? _______________

6.What is the range of years covered on this graph? (To find range,we subtract the highest from the lowest) ________

7.What was the highest number on disasters reported on this graph? What year was it in? _________

8.What was the lowest number on disasters reported on this graph? What year was it in? _________

9.What is the range of disasters reported on this graph? (To find range,we subtract the highest from the lowest) ________

10.Does the data increase, decrease, or stay the same between 1975 and 2004? ____________

11.Does the data increase, decrease, or stay the same between 2004 and 2005? ___________

12.Does the data increase, decrease, or stay the same between 2005 and 2010? ___________

13.In one sentence, describe the trend, or pattern, of natural disasters between 1975 and 2010 in the world?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



____________________________________________________________

“Volcano”

from National Geographic kids
Volcanoes in the News

Families from the small Hawaiian town of Pahoa are moving to safety as a slow-flowing river of lava threatens their homes.



The lava is coming from the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island. This is one of the world's most active volcanoes and it has been erupting since 1983.
How Volcanoes Form

In 1980 in Washington, after 123 years of hibernation, Mount St. Helens erupted. The blast destroyed and scorched 230 square miles (370 square kilometers) of forest within minutes. The eruption released an avalanche of hot ash, gas, steam, and rocks that mowed down giant trees up to 15 miles (24 kilometers) away.



When magma finds a way to escape from beneath the earth's surface, it creates a volcano.



Volcanoes erupt in different ways. Some, like Mount St. Helens, explode. Explosive eruptions are so powerful, they can shoot particles 20 miles up (32 kilometers), hurl 8-ton boulders more than a half mile (0.8 kilometers) away, and cause massive landslides. Explosive eruptions also create an avalanche of hot volcanic debris, ash, and gas that bulldozes everything in its path. Explosive volcanoes cause most of the volcano-related fatalities.



Volcanoes, like Mauna Loa in Hawaii, are effusive. Rather than a violent explosion, lava pours or flows out. Fatalities from effusive volcanoes are rare because people can usually outrun the lava. However, some people get too close or become trapped with no escape. The flowing lava burns, melts, and destroys everything it touches including farms, houses, and roads.



A volcanic eruption forever changes the landscape. Though volcanoes destroy, they also create mountains, islands, and, eventually, incredibly fertile land.

Carpet of Ash

Volcanic eruptions can cause damage hundreds of miles away. Volcanic ash causes airplane engines to fail, destroys crops, contaminates water, and damages electronics and machinery. The ash carpets the ground, burying everything, sometimes even causing buildings to collapse. Mount St. Helens produced more than 490 tons of ash that fell over a 22,000 square mile (56,980 square kilometer) area and caused problems in cities 370 miles (600 kilometers) away.

Red-Hot Facts

• The surface of the earth is called the "crust." The crust is cracked or broken into massive pieces called "plates." Magma flows beneath the crust. Volcanoes often form along the edges of where the plates meet.

• Most volcanoes and earthquakes, about 80%, happen close to where two (tectonic) plates meet.

• In the last 200 years, more than 50 volcanoes in the United States have erupted one or more times.



• The eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980 created the largest landslide in recorded history.



• It may be the same hot stuff, but it's called "magma" when it's below the surface. When it's above the surface, it's called "lava."

Earthquake



from National Geographic kids



In Alaska in 1964, a magnitude 9.2 earthquake jarred the earth so strongly it caused fishing boats to sink in Louisiana. What causes the ground tremble like that? The answer is simple. The Earth's surface is on the move.



The surface of the earth, called the "crust," is not one solid piece. It's more like a 20 piece puzzle. Each puzzle piece is called a "plate." The plates constantly move. Fortunately for us, they don't move fast. Geologists estimate the fastest plate might shift 6 inches a year (15 centimeters). That's about as fast as your hair grows.



Earthquakes happen when a plate scrapes, bumps, or drags along another plate. When does this happen? Constantly. About a half-million quakes rock the Earth every day. That's millions a year. People don't feel most of them because the quake is too small, too far below the surface, or deep in the sea. Some, however, are so powerful they can be felt thousands of miles away.



A powerful earthquake can cause landslides, tsunamis, flooding, and other catastrophic events. Most damage and deaths happen in populated areas. That's because the shaking can cause windows to break, structures to collapse, fire, and other dangers.



Geologists cannot predict earthquakes. They hope they will in the future through continued research and improved technology.



Earthquakes can happen anytime or anywhere. But you can prepare for the unpredictable with a family safety plan, emergency kit, and supplies.
FACTS

• Geologists rate earthquakes in magnitude, which is the amount of energy released during the quake.

• The largest recorded earthquake happened in Chile on May 22, 1960. It was a magnitude 9.5.

• The deadliest known earthquake happened in China in 1556. It killed about 830,000 people.

• Alaska has the record for the largest U.S. earthquake. On March 28, 1964, a magnitude 9.2 quake occurred and killed 131 people.

• Most earthquakes happen 50 miles (80 kilometers) or less below the Earth's surface. They can happen as deep as 400 miles (644 kilometers) below the surface.

• Southern California has about 10,000 earthquakes a year. Very few are felt.

• Alaska averages 24,000 earthquakes a year, the most seismic activity in North America.

• Florida and North Dakota have the fewest earthquakes in the U.S.

• In 1985, the jolt from an 8.1 magnitude earthquake in Michoacán, Mexico caused water to slosh out of a pool in Tucson, Arizona—1240 miles (2000 kilometers) away!

• Most earthquakes and volcanos—80%—happen close to where two plates meet.

• Depending on the plate, they move between 0.3 to 5.9 inches a year (1 to 15 centimeters) a year.

• Because of moving plates, geologists predict that Los Angeles will meet Alaska ... in 70 million years! (It'll be neighbors with San Francisco in 15 million years.)

Hurricane

from National Geographic kids




How Hurricanes Form

Interested in extreme weather events? Then a hurricane—a swirling mass of wind, rain, thunder, and chaos—will intrigue you. Hurricanes begin over tropical and subtropical ocean water. It starts when warm water, moist air, and strong winds collide and create a rotating bundle of thunderstorms and clouds. A hurricane might last a few hours or several days.



Some hurricanes roar onto land bringing punishing wind, torrential rain, walls of water, even tornados. The wind, rain, and water surge wreak havoc on the coastline and damage hundreds of miles inland.



Violent winds flip cars, sink boats, and rip houses apart. Hurricane winds range from 74 miles an hour (119 kilometers an hour) to 150 ​miles an hour​ (241 kilometers an hour) or more. Wind creates high waves and pushes the water onto shore. The water surge can be 30 feet (9 meters) high. That's as high as a 3-story building. Storm surges cause most of the fatalities and damage.



In addition to the storm surge, hurricanes bring rain. Lots of rain. In 2009, a storm hammered Taiwan with 114 inches (290 centimeters) of rain in only three days. Hurricane rains cause landslides, flash floods, and long-term floods.



Because meteorologists can predict and track hurricanes, people living in a hurricane's path can stay safe by advance preparation, including an evacuation plan, creating an emergency kit with food, water, and other supplies (don't forget your pets), and most importantly by listening to local authorities on the best ways to stay safe.



Hurricane Parts

Eye: The calm center. The eye can be 20-40 miles (32-48 kilometers) wide. In the eye, rather than dark clouds and rain, one might see blue sky or a starry night.
Eyewall: The clouds that swirl around the eye. It has the most intense rain and winds, sometimes as fast as 200 miles an hour (321 kilometers an hour).
Rain bands: Thunderstorms and clouds that spiral in toward the eyewall.

“Wildfires: Dry, Cold, and Windy”

from National Geographic




Uncontrolled blazes fueled by weather, wind, and dry underbrush, wildfires can burn acres of land—and consume everything in their paths—in mere minutes.

On average, more than 100,000 wildfires, also called wildland fires or forest fires, clear 4 million to 5 million acres (1.6 million to 2 million hectares) of land in the U.S. every year. In recent years, wildfires have burned up to 9 million acres (3.6 million hectares) of land. A wildfire moves at speeds of up to 14 miles an hour (23 kilometers an hour), consuming everything—trees, brush, homes, even humans—in its path.

There are three conditions that need to be present in order for a wildfire to burn, which firefighters refer to as the fire triangle: fuel, oxygen, and a heat source. Fuel is any flammable material surrounding a fire, including trees, grasses, brush, even homes. The greater an area's fuel load, the more intense the fire. Air supplies the oxygen a fire needs to burn. Heat sources help spark the wildfire and bring fuel to temperatures hot enough to ignite. Lightning, burning campfires or cigarettes, hot winds, and even the sun can all provide sufficient heat to spark a wildfire.

Although four out of five wildfires are started by people, nature is usually more than happy to help fan the flames. Dry weather and drought convert green vegetation into bone-dry, flammable fuel; strong winds spread fire quickly over land; and warm temperatures encourage combustion. When these factors come together all that's needed is a spark—in the form of lightning, arson, a downed power line, or a burning campfire or cigarette—to ignite a blaze that could last for weeks and consume tens of thousands of acres.

These violent infernos occur around the world and in most of the 50 states, but they are most common in the U.S. West, where heat, drought, and frequent thunderstorms create perfect wildfire conditions. Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Washington, Colorado, Oregon, and California experience some of the worst conflagrations in the U.S. In California wildfires are often made worse by the hot, dry Santa Ana winds, which can carry a spark for miles.

Firefighters fight wildfires by depriving them of one or more of the fire triangle fundamentals. Traditional methods include water dousing and spraying fire retardants to extinguish existing fires. Clearing vegetation to create firebreaks starves a fire of fuel and can help slow or contain it. Firefighters also fight wildfires by deliberately starting fires in a process called controlled burning. These prescribed fires remove undergrowth, brush, and ground litter from a forest, depriving a wildfire of fuel.

Although often harmful and destructive to humans, naturally occurring wildfires play an integral role in nature. They return nutrients to the soil by burning dead or decaying matter. They also act as a disinfectant, removing disease-ridden plants and harmful insects from a forest ecosystem. And by burning through thick canopies and brushy undergrowth, wildfires allow sunlight to reach the forest floor, enabling a new generation of seedlings to grow.

“Tsunami: Killer Waves”

from National Geographic
A tsunami is a series of ocean waves that sends surges of water, sometimes reaching heights of over 100 feet (30.5 meters), onto land. These walls of water can cause widespread destruction when they crash ashore.

These awe-inspiring waves are typically caused by large, undersea earthquakes at tectonic plate boundaries. When the ocean floor at a plate boundary rises or falls suddenly it displaces the water above it and launches the rolling waves that will become a tsunami.

Most tsunamis, about 80 percent, happen within the Pacific Ocean’s “Ring of Fire,” a geologically active area where tectonic shifts make volcanoes and earthquakes common.

Tsunamis may also be caused by underwater landslides or volcanic eruptions. They may even be launched, as they frequently were in Earth’s ancient past, by the impact of a large meteorite plunging into an ocean.

Tsunamis race across the sea at up to 500 miles (805 kilometers) an hour—about as fast as a jet airplane. At that pace they can cross the entire expanse of the Pacific Ocean in less than a day. And their long wavelengths mean they lose very little energy along the way.

In deep ocean, tsunami waves may appear only a foot or so high. But as they approach shoreline and enter shallower water they slow down and begin to grow in energy and height. The tops of the waves move faster than their bottoms do, which causes them to rise precipitously.

A tsunami’s trough, the low point beneath the wave’s crest, often reaches shore first. When it does, it produces a vacuum effect that sucks coastal water seaward and exposes harbor and sea floors. This retreating of sea water is an important warning sign of a tsunami, because the wave’s crest and its enormous volume of water typically hit shore five minutes or so later. Recognizing this phenomenon can save lives.

A tsunami is usually composed of a series of waves, called a wave train, so its destructive force may be compounded as successive waves reach shore. People experiencing a tsunami should remember that the danger may not have passed with the first wave and should await official word that it is safe to return to vulnerable locations.

Some tsunamis do not appear on shore as massive breaking waves but instead resemble a quickly surging tide that inundates coastal areas.

The best defense against any tsunami is early warning that allows people to seek higher ground. The Pacific Tsunami Warning System, a coalition of 26 nations headquartered in Hawaii, maintains a web of seismic equipment and water level gauges to identify tsunamis at sea. Similar systems are proposed to protect coastal areas worldwide.

Behavioral Objective B: Synthesis of data on natural disasters
Name:

Date:


Natural Disasters

Comprehension questions
Directions: Read the articles provided and then answer the following questions. Remember to answer in complete sentences.
1.)What takes place when a volcanic eruption is occurring?

2.)What takes place when a wildfire is occurring?

3.) What takes place when a hurricane is occurring?

4.)What takes place when a tsunami is occurring?

5.)What takes place when an earthquake is occurring?


Behavioral Objective A: Bar graph creation and analysis

Target student work


Legend: Year 2- 1975, Year 3- 1980, Year 4-1985, Year 5- 1990, Year 6- 1995, Year 7- 2000, Year 8- 2005, Year 9- 2010


1.What is the title of the graph? Disasters Reported around the world between 1975 and 2011

2.What type of data is on the x axis? Number of disasters reported

3.What type of data is on the y axis? year

4. What is the earliest date on the graph? 1975

5.What is the latest date on the graph? 2010

6.What is the range of years covered on this graph? (To find range,we subtract the highest from the lowest) 35 years

7.What was the highest number on disasters reported on this graph? What year was it in? 400 disasters reported in 2000 and 2005

8.What was the lowest number on disasters reported on this graph? What year was it in? 80 disasters reported in 1975

9.What is the range of disasters reported on this graph? (To find range,we subtract the highest from the lowest) 320 disasters

10.Does the data increase, decrease, or stay the same between 1975 and 2004? increase

11.Does the data increase, decrease, or stay the same between 2004 and 2005? stay the same

12.Does the data increase, decrease, or stay the same between 2005 and 2010? decrease

13.In one sentence, describe the trend, or pattern, of natural disasters between 1975 and 2010 in the world? The number of natural disasters around the world between 1975 and 2010 increased from 1975 to 2000, stayed the same from 2000 to 2005, and then decreased from 2005 to 2010.














































































































































Behavioral Objective B: Synthesis of data on natural disasters

Name:


Date:

Natural Disasters

Comprehension questions
Directions: Read the articles provided and then answer the following questions. Remember to answer in complete sentences.
1.)What takes place when a volcanic eruption is occurring?
The article, “Volcano” was about volcanoes. When volcanoes are erupting, several things are happening. Firstly, magma is gettimg released from inside the earth to the surface as lava. Secondly, a variety of gases are being emitted into the atmosphere. Lastly, bits of rock and other debris is being blasted off off the top of the summit.

2.)What takes place when a wildfire is occurring?


“Wildfire: Dry, Cold, and Windy” is about wildfires. When a wildfire is occurring, miles of dry brush is being burnt. Typically, the area that is on fire is dry
3.) What takes place when a hurricane is occurring?
“Hurricane” is an article about hurricanes. When a hurricane is taking place there is large rainfall and very strong winds. Some hurricanes roar onto land bringing punishing wind, torrential rain, walls of water, even tornados. The wind, rain, and water surge wreak havoc on the coastline and damage hundreds of miles inland. Violent winds flip cars, sink boats, and rip houses apart. Hurricane winds range from 74 miles an hour (119 kilometers an hour) to 150 ​miles an hour​ (241 kilometers an hour) or more. Wind creates high waves and pushes the water onto shore.
4.)What takes place when a tsunami is occurring?
“Tsunamis: Killer Waves” is about tsunamis. Tsunamis are very large waves that travel acorss the ocean. As a tsunami is occurring waves race across the sea at up to 500 miles an hour—about as fast as a jet airplane.
5.)What takes place when an earthquake is occurring?
“Earthquakes” is an article about earthquakes. When an earthquake is occurring the ground and structures are shaking. There are many things being broken and destroyed. A powerful earthquake can cause landslides, tsunamis, flooding, and other catastrophic event.

References:
EM- DAT: The International Disaster Database. (2009) Retrieved on December 5, 2014 from:

http://www.emdat.be/natural-disasters-trends
National Geographic kids: Volcanoes (2014). Retrieved on December 5, 2014 from:

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/content/kids/en_US/explore/science/volcano/
National Geographic kids: Earthquakes (2014). Retrieved on December 5, 2014 from:

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/content/kids/en_US/explore/science/earthquake/
National Geographic kids: Hurricanes (2014). Retrieved on December 5, 2014 from:

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/science/hurricane/
National Geographic: Wildfires: Dry, Cold, and Windy (2014). Retrieved on December 5, 2014 from:

http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/wildfires/
National Geographic: Tsunamis: Killer Waves (2014). Retrieved on December 5, 2014 from:

http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/tsunami-profile/


Lesson #2

file:big tropical forest fire.

It’s Gettin’ Hot in Here!”

Wildfires

by Jeremy Kirchgraber

Team 6, Fall 2014


Blooms Taxonomy: Definitions, Knowledge, Comprehension, Evaluation
Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences: Visual- Spatial, Bodily- Kinesthetic




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