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Training Resources for Dementia Care Providers and Volunteers





Training Resources for Dementia Care Providers and Volunteers

September 2018

Prepared for

Erin Long, MSW

Administration on Aging

Administration for Community Living

330 C Street, SW

Washington, DC 20201

Prepared by

Elizabeth Gould, MSW, LCSW

Patty Yuen

Donna Walberg, MBA

RTI International

701 13th Street, NW, Suite 750

Washington, DC 20005

Contract # HHSP2332009565IWC

Administration for Community Living

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


Contents

Section Page



Training Resources for Dementia Care Providers and Volunteers 1

Training Resources for Dementia Care Providers and Volunteers 3

Contents 3

Introduction 1

Introduction 1

Advance Planning 1

Advance Planning 1

Other Related Resources 1

Other Related Resources 1

Activities of Daily Living 2

Activities of Daily Living 2

Other Related Resources 2

Other Related Resources 2

Dementia Training Series 3

Dementia Training Series 3

Other Related Resources 5

Other Related Resources 5

Caregiving 5

Caregiving 5

Other Related Resources 6

Other Related Resources 6

Understanding Behavioral Symptoms 6

Understanding Behavioral Symptoms 6

Other Related Resources 7

Other Related Resources 7

Diverse Populations and Dementia 8

Diverse Populations and Dementia 8

People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Dementia 8

People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Dementia 8

Screening Tools 9

Screening Tools 9

Other Related Resources 10

Other Related Resources 10

People with Dementia Who Live Alone 10

People with Dementia Who Live Alone 10

Other Related Resources 11

Other Related Resources 11

Aging and Disability Resource Center Training 12

Aging and Disability Resource Center Training 12

Other Related Resources 13

Other Related Resources 13

Specific Professional Audiences 13

Specific Professional Audiences 13

First Responders 13

First Responders 13

Hospital and Health Systems Professionals 14

Hospital and Health Systems Professionals 14

Primary Care Providers 14

Primary Care Providers 14

Middle School and High School Teachers 14

Middle School and High School Teachers 14


Introduction


Training of dementia care providers and volunteers is important for achieving dementia capability. Information and referral/assistance staff, options counselors, care managers, home care providers, other professionals, and volunteers can be trained on how to recognize, understand, and meet the unique needs of people with dementia and their caregivers. The training resources in this toolkit were reviewed by the National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center (NADRC). This list of resources is not exhaustive and does not imply endorsement.

The training resources are free of charge and come from a variety of sources including government, academia, Alzheimer’s disease centers, geriatric workforce education programs, and others. Other Related Resources sections include supplemental materials that can be used to extend the learning experience.


Advance Planning


This section features basic information about advance planning in dementia care including assessing decision-making capacity, advance health care and financial planning, and supported decision-making. Other resources that could be used as part of a training are also included in this section, such as tip sheets, websites, and articles.

  • Dementia Conversations: Driving, Doctor Visits, Legal and Financial Planning, Alzheimer’s Association. This training provides tips for having the conversation as a family so you can address some of the most common issues that are difficult to discuss: going to the doctor for a diagnosis or medical treatment, deciding when to stop driving, and making legal and financial plans for future care. (Web-based training)

Other Related Resources


  • Decision Making and Dementia, Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing. Part of the Try This® series of tip sheets for hospital nurses, provides principles and guidelines for evaluating the capacity of people with Alzheimer’s or dementia to make their own medical decisions. (PDF)

  • Living with Dementia: Advance Planning Guides for Persons with Dementia and Caregivers, National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center. These guides were developed with consultation from the American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging for individuals living with dementia and family caregivers to assist with advance planning. The guides are concise with relevant resources and are designed to be easily accessible by individuals with dementia through use of plain language, color contrast, and illustrated drawings. Guides cover Health Care Planning, Planning for Care, Financial Planning, and Making Decisions for Someone with Dementia. (PDF)

Activities of Daily Living


Over time, an individual living with dementia will require more assistance with activities of daily living. This section includes online courses, video clips, tip sheets, and support resources for assisting with activities of daily living.

  • Dementia and Driving Resource Center, Alzheimer’s Association. The Alzheimer’s Association Dementia and Driving Resource Center webpage provides videos, tips, and other resources on having the conversation, planning ahead, and signs of unsafe driving. (Multimedia)

  • Support Group Leaders Kit on Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia and Driving, The Hartford. This kit on dementia and driving is for support group leaders to deliver to caregivers. The kit is a four-session educational workshop on dementia and driving for delivery by support group leaders to caregivers. The workshop is designed for practical application. (PDF)

Other Related Resources


  • Caring Sheets, Michigan Dementia Coalition. The Dementia Care Series, Caring Sheets: Thoughts & Suggestions for Caring, are edited and produced by Eastern Michigan University Alzheimer’s Education and Research Program for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. A series of concise guides on a variety of topics including moving people with dementia, safety after hip surgery, transferring people with dementia, assisting with daily tasks, interventions geared toward frontotemporal dementia and Lewy body dementia, and safety. (PDF)

  • Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory – Home Care (PELI-HC)©, Polisher Research Institute, Abramson Center for Jewish Life. This tool is used to identify personal preferences for everyday living of home care recipients. The PELI assesses a wide range of activity preferences. The inventory allows a home care professional, family member, or individual with dementia to document lifestyle preferences and provide information to paid caregivers to assist with individualized, person-centered care. Please do not reprint without permission. (PDF) Contact Kimberly S. Van Haitsma, PhD.

Dementia Training Series


This section includes comprehensive dementia care training series that cover a variety of topics in dementia care including understanding Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, behavioral symptoms, communication techniques, and caregiver support. Video clips and tip sheets are included that could be used as part of a training.

  • Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias Curriculum, Health Resources Services Administration. This 16-module online training for the primary care workforce provides information about dementia care and helps providers address caregiver needs. Modules 1-12 contain information about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias of particular interest to the primary care workforce. Modules 13-16 specify the roles of specific health care professions in dementia care. All 16 core modules include a PowerPoint presentation, with detailed notes, and a reference list, to assist with teaching and presentations. Online training also includes 4 supplemental modules for providers in understanding caregiver needs and 5 modules helping caregivers understand the symptoms of dementia. The modules focus primarily on outpatient rather than residential care because the majority of people living with dementia remain in their homes during the earlier, and some even through later stages, of dementia.

  • Alzheimer’s Training for Health Care Providers, University of Kentucky. This 10-module CE credit course trains health care providers, especially those in medically underserved areas, in Alzheimer’s disease, non-Alzheimer’s dementias, diagnosis and treatment, management, and related topics. (Web-based training)

  • Free eLearning Workshops, Alzheimer’s Association. The training offers a range of web-based workshops that are available to the general public, caregivers, and professionals working with individuals who have dementia. The 14 web-based programs cover early detection and warning signs, general information about dementia, legal and financial planning, living with Alzheimer’s disease, and information about caregiving for individuals in the early, middle, and late stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Each web-based training program is approximately 1 hour in duration. (Web-based training)

  • Dementia Curriculum, Act on Alzheimer’s Collaborative, Minnesota. Developed by leading experts in Minnesota, the 10-module curriculum can stand on its own or be integrated into existing, complementary education. Topics addressed include disease description, demographics, societal impact, effective interactions, cognitive assessment and value of early detection, screening, disease diagnosis, quality interventions, dementia as an organizing principle of care, and caregiver support. (PowerPoint)

  • Dementia Capability webinars, Rosalynn Carter Institute. The Rosalynn Carter Institute for Caregiving has a series of Dementia Capability Webinars that can be used to train a variety of professionals, including State Units on Aging, Area Agencies on Aging, and ADRC staff members. The intended audience is professionals serving families and individuals with dementia. The topics of the webinars vary, with an emphasis on building general knowledge about dementia. Each webinar lasts approximately 1 hour. (Webinar)

  • Dementia Capable Wisconsin: Dementia Care Training for Community Members, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Center for Career Development and Employability Training and the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of Long Term Care. Because most people living with dementia reside in the community, business, government, spiritual, and volunteer organizations often seek additional information to learn more about how to interact with community members who are living with dementia. This dementia care training is designed specifically for community members. (Web-based training)

  • Dementia Friendly Provider Practice Tools and Training Videos, Dementia Friendly America. Website offers an array of provider practice tools and training videos under the Tools and Resources section addressing screening, diagnosis, diagnostic disclosure, and care coordination. (Multimedia)

  • Interprofessional Approach to Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Care, New Jersey Geriatric Education Center (NJGEC) has a free, five-module, web-based program on dementia care. The modules cover the interprofessional approach to assessment and management of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. The series is provided with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration and in collaboration with Administration for Community Living. (Web-based training)

  • Living with Dementia: Impact on Individuals, Caregivers, Communities and Societies, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. This 5-week online course is for health professionals and students, family caregivers, individuals, and others interested in learning about dementia. The course begins by examining the brain of a person with dementia to provide a basic overview of disease pathology, the stages of dementia, and the trajectory of the illness. The course addresses quality of life issues for individuals and family members and specific coping strategies. Throughout the training course, presenters use theoretical and practical frameworks that inform approaches for supporting and caring for individuals living with dementia and their caregivers. (Web-based training)

  • Mental Health and Aging Training Initiative webinar series, Virginia Geriatric Mental Health Partnership. The Mental Health and Aging Training Initiative delivers free education and training to enhance geriatric workforce development and improve communication and service coordination between mental health and long-term care providers. Webinars offer insight into the complex needs of older adults with behavioral health issues and provide the tools and techniques for person-centered interventions using vignettes, case reviews, and interactive polls. (Web-based training)

Other Related Resources


  • Frontotemporal Dementia, University of California, Los Angeles. In collaboration with the Los Angeles Times, the UCLA Behavioral Neurology program developed a brief video explaining frontotemporal dementia that features a son with his mother who has frontotemporal dementia. (Video)

  • Try This:® Series, Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing. ConsultGeriRN.org is the evidence-based geriatric clinical nursing website of The Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, at New York University’s College of Nursing. Try This:® Series offers assessment tools on a variety of topics relevant to the care of older adults. The How to Try This series is composed of articles and videos presenting cases studies demonstrating the use of the Try This:®series. The dementia series is focused on tools and strategies in the assessment of older adults with dementia. These tools can be used by a variety of health professionals. (Multimedia)

  • UCSF Alzheimer’s Disease Center YouTube channel, University of California-San Francisco. The UCSF YouTube channel has a series of short videos on a variety of topics including acceptance, activities, meals, patience and preparation and dental hygiene. (Video)

Caregiving


The majority of people with dementia live in the community and most care is provided by family and friends. Although the care provided is similar to that for other conditions, those providing care to a person with dementia tend to provide more extensive assistance, including hands-on personal care, increased supervision, and responding to behavioral symptoms such as aggression or wandering. To respond appropriately, providers need to understand the person’s unique needs.

  • iCareFamily, National Institute on Aging. iCareFamily is a stress management skills training program for caregivers of individuals with memory problems. In collaboration with Stanford University, the Alzheimer’s Association and other organizations created online training videos to help caregivers overcome stressful situations in the caregiver role. The goal of this program is to teach skills and provide tools and resources to enhance coping with caregiving and improve quality of life. (Video)

  • Identifying and Supporting Dementia Caregivers in Healthcare Settings, National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center. This webinar defines the challenges and benefits of including family caregivers as members of the health care team. The presenters discuss the benefits of improving family caregivers’ representation in the electronic health record (EHR) of people living with dementia; multiple ways in which health care systems could better identify family caregivers in EHRs and other forms of health IT; and tools care managers can use to identify, assess and support family caregivers of people with dementia within health care systems and identify practices that can be leveraged to improve caregiver identification. (Webinar)

Other Related Resources


  • Living with Alzheimer’s Disease, American Occupational Therapy Association. Occupational therapy practitioners help people with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers to live life to its fullest by adapting the environment and focusing on what they can do to maximize engagement in activity, promote safety, and enhance quality of life. The tips are in English and Spanish. (PDF)

  • Hit Pause: Helping Dementia Families Deal with Anger, Duke Family Support Program. This 10-page booklet assists professionals when providing practical help and emotional support to caregivers of people with dementia. It offers typical scenarios and suggested responses when helping families develop confidence in their ability to maintain balance under trying circumstances. (PDF)

Understanding Behavioral Symptoms


As dementia progresses, individuals will communicate their needs through their behavior when words become too difficult. Person-centered care requires understanding the possible underlying causes of the behavioral symptoms of dementia and tailoring one’s response so that it meets individuals’ needs. Underlying causes can be attributed to physical health, psychological and social well-being, the environment, and the complexity of a task. Applying what is known about individuals such as preferences, daily routine, hobbies, family and friends, and personal history can contribute to a meaningful response.

  • Caregiver Training Videos, UCLA Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Program. The website contains brief video segments to help caregivers understand how to better care for people with dementia. They cover a range of topics including aggressive behavior, depression and apathy, hallucinations, repetitive phone calls, sexually inappropriate behaviors, sundowning, and wandering. Each video features a behavioral issue with the following general format: (1) behavior of person with dementia with the usual caregiver response; (2) expert analysis and explanation of behavior with tips to identify and eliminate triggers and suggestions for redirection; and (3) response of caregiver showing tips in action.

  • Dementia Capable Wisconsin: A Guide for Family Caregivers, Wisconsin Department of Health Services. The symptoms of dementia include changes in behavior that can be difficult for family members to understand. This presentation discusses basic information about dementia and describes strategies for family caregivers to consider when providing care to someone who has changes in their behavior as a result of dementia. It also includes information on how to support family members who are providing care for a person with dementia and how family caregiver can take care of themselves. (Web-based training)

Other Related Resources


  • Caregiver Tip Sheets, Alzheimer’s Greater Los Angeles. A series of plain language tip sheets on various topics including home safety, bathing, toileting, medications, getting lost, hallucinations, anger, driving, and communication. (PDF)

  • IDEA! Three Step Strategy, Alzheimer’s Greater Los Angeles. IDEA! is a simple three-step strategy designed to assist caregivers with understanding a specific behavior with individualized approaches for addressing it. (PDF)

  • Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Dementia: A Visual Guide to Response Considerations. Alzheimer’s Association, Heart of America chapter and Kansas Department on Aging. This guide describes common behavioral symptoms, possible reasons for behaviors and specific interventions. The guide is a brief reference tool with tabbed sections for professionals working with people with dementia. (PDF)

  • Person-Centered Matters, CCAL Advancing Person Centered Living. A 16-minute video produced by the Dementia Action Alliance and filmed by a former National Geographic filmmaker. It portrays five people living with dementia and how person-centered care helps them live more fully. (Video)

Diverse Populations and Dementia


The resources in this section will assist in developing a better understanding of perceptions of dementia within different cultures and inform a more individualized approach to dementia care needs among diverse older adults, their families, and other care providers.

  • Diverse Populations, Health Disparities and Dementia, National Institute on Aging and the Administration for Community Living. The National Institute on Aging and Administration for Community Living, in partnership with grantees including the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers, Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Center, and the Eldercare Locator partnered to host a webinar series to improve coordination of resources available to assist people with Alzheimer’s Disease or other dementias and their family caregivers. This webinar features an overview of diverse populations, health disparities, and dementia. (Webinar)

  • Evidence-Based Interventions for Family Caregivers of Persons with Dementia, Stanford Geriatric and Education Center. This webinar provides an overview of dementia caregiving, experiences of African American, Latino, and Chinese American dementia family caregivers, various evidence-based dementia family caregiver interventions and best practices in selecting an intervention, and components of a culturally sensitive intervention for dementia family caregivers. Duration of webinar is 1 hour. (Webinar)

People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Dementia


People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders in some of the same ways as the general population. However, because of the additional genetic and neurological factors, the impact of dementia may be more challenging. This section provides webinars and online training along with screening tools and other materials. Many of the resources below focus specifically on Down syndrome.

  • Caregiving for People with Dementia and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Including Down Syndrome, National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center. Presenters discuss the impact of caring for a family member with dementia and an intellectual disability, including Down syndrome; community living providers and their work with people with dementia and intellectual disabilities, including Down syndrome; and the perspectives of a family caregiver on the challenges of caring for a family member with dementia and Down syndrome. (Webinar)

  • Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities and Dementia, National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center. Presentation from this September 2015 webinar addresses similarities and differences in warning signs and symptoms for the general population and individuals with IDD with emphasis on Down syndrome, the philosophy of care, quality of life, models of care, family caregiver support, care transitions, and common IDD vocabulary. (Webinar)

  • Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Dementia - Experiences of a Family Advocate and Promising Practices, National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center. Presentation from this February 26, 2015, webinar focuses on how to best serve the needs of people with IDD and dementia. The presentation includes background information about the prevalence of IDD and dementia in the United States, barriers to good dementia care for people with IDD, and programming models for this population. (Webinar)

  • Serving People with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities (IDD) and Dementia online training, Minnesota Department of Human Services. This online training is designed to assist case managers and certified assessors understand the impact that dementia has on those who have IDD; what is different; how to best support the person, their families, and caregivers; and best practices. (Web-based training)

Screening Tools


  • Dementia Screening Questionnaire for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (DSQIID), University of Birmingham, Division of Neuroscience. The screening tool is a user-friendly observer-rated questionnaire for screening for dementia among adults with Down syndrome that can be completed by care providers. Journal citation: Deb S, Hare M, Prior L, Bhaumik S. Dementia screening questionnaire for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Br J Psychiatry. 2007 May. 190:440-4. (PDF)

  • Early Detection Screen for Dementia (EDSD), National Task Group (NTG). Screening tool adapted from Dementia Screening Questionnaire for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (DSQIID). The purpose of the NTG-EDSD is to offer family and professional caregivers a resource to record their observations regarding changes in areas of cognitive and adaptive functioning known to be associated with dementia. The screen captures information to facilitate dialog and aid in shared decision-making. The webpage contains links to the early detection screening tools in various languages and a manual on how to administer. (PDF)

  • Assessment and Diagnosis of Dementia in Individuals with Intellectual Disability: A Toolkit for Clinicians and Caseworkers, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. This toolkit was developed for clinicians and caseworkers who are concerned about the presence of dementia in their clients with intellectual disability. It compares the incidence, prevalence, and clinical features of dementia of the Alzheimer type in adults with ID (with an emphasis on Down syndrome) with that of the general population and then outlines the modifications to diagnostic approaches that are needed to improve diagnostic accuracy for adults with ID potentially affected by dementia. Many neuropsychological assessment measures that have been developed or adapted for use with adults with ID are reviewed. (Document)

Other Related Resources


  • Basic Questions about Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Affected by Alzheimer’s Disease or Other Dementias, National Task Group. The document addresses questions about Alzheimer’s and related dementias; dementia and people with IDD; assessment, diagnosis, and treatment; interacting with health care providers; medications; programs, supports, and services; nutrition; and end-of-life care. (PDF)

People with Dementia Who Live Alone


People with dementia who live alone are much less likely than people with dementia who live with others in the community to have been diagnosed with the condition. Furthermore, these individuals are less likely to recognize their own limitations and are unlikely to seek the help they need. People living alone with dementia are at high risk for numerous adverse events including self-neglect, malnutrition, accidental injury, medication errors, financial exploitation, social isolation, and unattended wandering. Home and community-based services providers need training and support to work effectively with this vulnerable population.

  • Identifying and Meeting the Needs of Individuals with Dementia Who Live Alone, National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center. This webinar addresses the prevalence and characteristics of people with dementia who live alone, their unmet care needs, signs of self-neglect and intervention strategies, and information on the experiences of people with dementia who live alone. (Webinar)

  • Preventing Elder Investment Fraud, Investor Protection Trust. Website with resources and materials including a clinician’s pocket guide and a short video that addresses the widespread problem of elder investment fraud and financial exploitation and explores some of the possible solutions. The video includes interviews with elder fraud victims, their families, doctors, and caretakers in addition to representatives from the Pennsylvania Securities Commission. (Multimedia)

Other Related Resources


  • Can a Person with Alzheimer’s Live Alone? Duke Family Support Program. This tip sheet provides a list of questions that may guide decisions about the safety of someone with a memory disorder living alone. (PDF)

  • Considerations for Those Who Live Alone, Alzheimer’s Association. This resource provides general guidelines for working with individuals with dementia who live alone. (Document)

  • Fraud Protection for Elders Living Alone, Duke Family Support Program. This tip sheet provides a bulleted list of ways to protect elders at risk of being exploited by people intent on fraud. (PDF)

  • Guide for Professionals on Practical Strategies for Persons with Dementia Living Alone, National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center. This resource guide provides specific strategies for how home and community-based service professionals can work with this population. The guide is organized in six major sections that address different practical strategies of working with individuals with dementia who live alone: Identifying individuals with dementia who live alone; Building trust; Supporting safety and autonomy; Involving family and friends; Coordinating paid providers and formal support services; and Assisting with transition to a new setting. (PDF)

  • People with Dementia Living Alone Risk Assessment, University of Iowa. This assessment tool assists with identifying level of risk of people with dementia who are living alone in the community and is adapted from an assessment tool developed by the University of Iowa School of Nursing. (PDF)

Aging and Disability Resource Center Training


The resources below focus on person-centered support and guidance to individuals, family members, and caregivers to help them develop a long-term care plan that closely aligns with their specific needs and personal preferences. This section provides resources that can be used in training options counselors and other ADRC staff.

  • Aging Services and Supports for People Living with Dementia - ADRC Dementia Training, Portland State University. These web-based trainings were based on input and piloting by Oregon ADRC partners. Individuals may view these trainings on their own; however, group viewing and discussion using the provided Companion Guides is encouraged. (Webinar and PDF)

Tier 1

  • Module 1 - Implementing Person-Centered Dementia Support

  • Module 2 - Communication and Behavioral Expression

  • Module 3 - Medical and Clinical Aspects of Dementia

  • Module 4 - Information and Referral Issues

  • Tier 1 Companion Guide (PDF)

Tier 2

  • Module 5 - Introducing Decision Support Tools

  • Module 6 - Decision Support through Person-Centered Planning

  • Module 7 - Decision Support in Care Transitions

  • Module 8 - Decision Support for Advanced Care and End of Life Planning

  • Tier 2 Companion Guide (PDF)

  • No Wrong Door Dementia Capable Trainings, Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services. As part of an ongoing Administration for Community Living grant for the Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services Program, the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services is expanding and standardizing dementia knowledge within the No Wrong Door network. The webpage provides information on available virtual and written training materials for Information and Referral Specialists, Options Counselors, and Care Transition Coaches. (Multimedia)

Other Related Resources


  • Communicating with People Who Have Alzheimer’s or other Dementia: Aging I&R/A Tips, National Aging Information and Referral Support Center, National Association of State Units on Aging. Tip sheet developed to assist aging information and referral staff with effective communication techniques when working with someone who has Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia. (PDF)

Specific Professional Audiences


The dementia capable trainings listed below target specific health care professionals and community providers, including first responders, hospital personnel, primary care providers, and school teachers.

First Responders


  • Approaching Alzheimer’s: First Responder Training Program, Alzheimer’s Association. An online training that uses an interactive format, developed with input from first responders. (Web-based training)

  • IACP Alzheimer’s Initiative, International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP). Funded by the Department of Justice, this website provides a variety of resources to help first responders improve their knowledge and skills to safeguard people with dementia. (Multimedia)

  • First Responder Alzheimer’s and Dementia training videos, Alzheimer’s Orange County. The videos consist of four short clips, totaling 15 minutes, which portray law enforcement officers encountering individuals with dementia during standard patrol: (1) during a traffic stop; (2) a wandering event; (3) coming to a home where a daughter has called 911 for help with her very agitated/aggressive mother with dementia; and (4) coming to a home where a woman with dementia has called 911 thinking someone has tried to rob her home. The four separate videos have been combined into one on this link. (Video)

Hospital and Health Systems Professionals


  • Creating Dementia Capable Health Care Systems, Alzheimer’s Greater Los Angeles. This webpage contains various resources including care manager training materials, assessment instruments, a tool for identifying informal or family caregivers, best practice care plans, resources on health care systems change, and dementia care management toolkits to support health care organizations build dementia-capable systems of care. (Multimedia)

  • Going to the Hospital: Tips for Dementia Caregivers, National Institute on Aging. Designed to help hospital professionals to meet the needs of patients with dementia, this webpage contains links to facts about Alzheimer’s disease, communication tips, personal care techniques, suggestions for working with behaviors and environmental factors to consider in the ER and in the hospital room. (Multimedia)

Primary Care Providers


  • KAER Toolkit - The Gerontological Society of America formed a workgroup to create a report and recommendations for promoting cognitive impairment detection and earlier diagnosis of dementia in the primary care setting in the United States. The report recommended a four step KAER framework: Kickstart the cognition conversation, Assess for cognitive impairment, Evaluate for dementia, Refer patient for community resources. (PDF)

  • Assessing Cognitive Impairment in Older Patients: A Quick Guide for Primary Care Physicians, National Institute on Aging. The guide addresses the importance of cognitive assessment, benefits of early screening, and when to screen, and provides numerous resources. (Multimedia)

Middle School and High School Teachers


  • Advocating for Friends and Family: Building Empathic Responses, Wisconsin Department of Health Services and Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. A lesson designed for health educators that supplements existing curriculum about brain health. Students will be able to describe accurate functional health knowledge related to dementia, resulting in a heightened sense of empathy, which will allow the student to develop a plan to advocate for the health of self, friends, family and community. (PDF)


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