University of Hawai‘i Maui College dental assisting program review october 21, 2013



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University of Hawai‘i Maui College

DENTAL ASSISTING PROGRAM REVIEW

October 21, 2013

c:\users\joyce\pictures\2013-2014 dap students.jpg

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Dental Assisting Program Mission 3

Introduction 3

Quantitative Indicators 4

Quantitative Indicators Description 6

Perkins IV Core Indicators Analysis 7

Program Learning Outcomes 8

Program Map: Student Learning Outcomes Grid 9

Assessment Plan 10

PLO Assessment Timetable 10

Analysis of Student Outcome and Goal Achievement 10

Program Assessment 10

Evidence of Student Learning 10

DENT 164 – PLO 2 (fall 2012) 10

DENT 152 – PLO 1 (spring 2013) 12

CASLO Analysis – Written Communication 13

Expected Level of Achievement 15

Industry Validation 16

Program Plans and Goals 17

Planning and Policy Considerations 18

Budgetary Considerations 18

Engaged Community 19

Recognize and Support Best Practices 20

Appendix 21

2012-2013 Community Experts who Share Their Expertise 21

Student Survey of iPad/ Livetext Initiative (spring 2013) 23

2012-2013 Employer Survey 28

2012-2013 Student Exit Survey 29

2012-2013 Community Service Events 32

Carl D. Perkins Industry Validation Advisory Committee

Approval by UHMC Dental Advisory Board members 35

Rubric for Evaluating Outcome and Goal Achievement

Degree Program Review Assessment Rubric

Degree Program Review Examples of Evidence

DENTAL ASSISTING PROGRAM REVIEW

2012-2013

Program Mission Statement

The University of Hawai‘i Maui College Dental Assisting Program is dedicated to educating and preparing dental assisting leaders for careers in a diverse and changing health care environment and providing a liberal education as well as outstanding clinical experiences.

The curriculum reflects the core values of the dental profession in private and public health settings. The program is committed to creating a humanistic, educational environment that will facilitate the development of responsible, ethical, oral health professionals who are sensitive to patient needs and competent in all areas of dental assisting. The program strives to produce graduates who are confident and compassionate in their profession and competent in self-assessment in preparation for lifelong learning.

Educational and clinical services provided by dental assisting students include dental health education, disease prevention, and promoting the highest standards of oral health care for a diverse population of patients.



Introduction

The University of Hawai‘i Maui College Dental Assisting Program began in fall 2002 in response to community need for dental auxiliaries (dental assistants and dental hygienists) and an urgent need to increase the number of oral health providers in Maui County. Dental care and oral health are priorities of the Surgeon General and the Hawai‘i Health Department. Hawai‘i is below the national average for access to oral health care. Lorrin Pang, M.D., Maui County Health Officer estimates 33 percent of Maui County residents do not have adequate access to dental health care. The issues are complex and include lack of public water fluoridation, inadequate reimbursement for dental care, and shortage of dental auxiliaries. Generally, the neighbor islands, where the rates of poverty, lack of insurance, and Medicaid coverage are highest, have greater needs and fewer available dentists than O’ahu. The entire island of Maui is recognized by the federal government as a Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas and continues to need qualified dental assisting professionals.



The UH Maui College’s Dental Assisting Program is a two-semester program that provides students with the skills needed to succeed in the dental profession. Accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation (ADACODA), the Dental Assisting Program offers classroom instruction and hands-on clinical training at the Maui Oral Health Center and private dental offices on Maui.

  1. Quantitative Indicators

Overall Program Health: Healthy

Majors Included: DENT     Program CIP: 51.0601

Demand Indicators

Program Year

Demand Health Call

10-11

11-12

12-13

1

New & Replacement Positions (State)

73

69

64

Healthy

2

*New & Replacement Positions (County Prorated)

9

10

9

3

*Number of Majors

10.5

17

18

3a

    Number of Majors Native Hawaiian

3

7

5

3b

    Fall Full-Time

15%

100%

100%

3c

    Fall Part-Time

85%

0%

0%

3d

    Fall Part-Time who are Full-Time in System

15%

0%

0%

3e

    Spring Full-Time

13%

6%

50%

3f

    Spring Part-Time

88%

94%

50%

3g

    Spring Part-Time who are Full-Time in System

0%

29%

11%

4

SSH Program Majors in Program Classes

46

388

414

5

SSH Non-Majors in Program Classes

385

220

6

6

SSH in All Program Classes

431

608

420

7

FTE Enrollment in Program Classes

14

20

14

8

Total Number of Classes Taught

9

20

9




Efficiency Indicators

Program Year

Efficiency Health Call

10-11

11-12

12-13

9

Average Class Size

18.7

13

18.2

Healthy

10

*Fill Rate

93.3%

93.5%

98.7%

11

FTE BOR Appointed Faculty

2

2

1

12

*Majors to FTE BOR Appointed Faculty

5.2

8.5

18

13

Majors to Analytic FTE Faculty

12.3

10.2

21.1

13a

Analytic FTE Faculty

0.9

1.7

0.9

14

Overall Program Budget Allocation

$85,055

$773,071

Not Yet Reported

14a

General Funded Budget Allocation

$67,055

$107,992

Not Yet Reported

14b

Special/Federal Budget Allocation

$0

$0

Not Yet Reported

14c

Tuition and Fees

$0

$16,144

Not Yet Reported

15

Cost per SSH

$197

$1,271

Not Yet Reported

16

Number of Low-Enrolled (<10) Classes

0

2

0




*Data element used in health call calculation

Last Updated: October 3, 2013




Effectiveness Indicators

Program Year

Effectiveness Health Call

10-11

11-12

12-13

17

Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)

99%

100%

100%

Healthy

18

Withdrawals (Grade = W)

0

0

0

19

*Persistence Fall to Spring

61.5%

100%

100%

19a

Persistence Fall to Fall

 

 

0%

20

*Unduplicated Degrees/Certificates Awarded

17

14

18

20a

Degrees Awarded

0

0

0

20b

Certificates of Achievement Awarded

0

0

0

20c

Advanced Professional Certificates Awarded

0

0

0

20d

Other Certificates Awarded

17

14

18

21

External Licensing Exams Passed

 

100%

N/A

22

Transfers to UH 4-yr

2

0

0

22a

Transfers with credential from program

0

0

0

22b

Transfers without credential from program

2

0

0




Distance Education:
Completely On-line Classes


Program Year

 

10-11

11-12

12-13

23

Number of Distance Education Classes Taught

0

0

0

 

24

Enrollments Distance Education Classes

N/A

N/A

N/A

25

Fill Rate

N/A

N/A

N/A

26

Successful Completion (Equivalent C or Higher)

N/A

N/A

N/A

27

Withdrawals (Grade = W)

N/A

N/A

N/A

28

Persistence (Fall to Spring Not Limited to Distance Education)

N/A

N/A

N/A




Perkins IV Core Indicators
2011-2012


Goal

Actual

Met

 

29

1P1 Technical Skills Attainment

90.00

100.00

Met

 

30

2P1 Completion

50.00

77.78

Met

31

3P1 Student Retention or Transfer

74.25

90.00

Met

32

4P1 Student Placement

60.00

66.67

Met

33

5P1 Nontraditional Participation

17.00

0.00

Not Met

34

5P2 Nontraditional Completion

15.25

0.00

Not Met




Performance Funding

Program Year

 

10-11

11-12

12-13

35

Number of Degrees and Certificates

 

 

0

 

36

Number of Degrees and Certificates Native Hawaiian

 

 

0

37

Number of Degrees and Certificates STEM

 

 

0

38

Number of Pell Recipients

 

 

9

39

Number of Transfers to UH 4-yr

 

 

0




*Data element used in health call calculation

Last Updated: October 3, 2013



  1. Demand Indicators

Demand health call for the UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program is Healthy. 100% of the 18 2013 Dental Assisting graduates are working in dental offices and/or attending or pursuing admittance to the UHMC Dental Hygiene Program. 14 of the18 total students are employed in a dental office, working as a dental assistant. Two students are enrolled in the UH Maui College Dental Hygiene Program and two students are pursuing admittance in the UH Maui College Dental Hygiene Program, taking pre-requisite courses in preparation to apply. Student employment placement and demand has remained steady and all UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program graduates were able to secure dental jobs.


  1. Efficacy Indicators

Efficacy health call for the UH Maui College Dental Assisting Program is Healthy. The Dental Assisting Program has maintained a high number of qualified applicants due to determined promotion at monthly general orientation meetings advertised in the local newspaper, a high school career-shadowing program, high school career fairs, and dental program orientations at local high schools and at UH Maui College.
Due to American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation (ADACODA) accreditation requirements, the maximum class size is 18 students. There is only one full-time faculty member.





F12

F13

Number of qualified applicants

42

38

Number of students starting fall semester in DA program

(Maximum capacity is 18 students)



18

18

Budget constraints and lack of clinical space has been a weakness for the Dental Assisting Program. The program completes pre-clinical and clinical requirements at the Maui Oral Health Center. The UH Maui College Dental Assisting and Dental Hygiene Programs, Lutheran Medical Residency Program, and the Maui Oral Health Center share 7 operatories at an off-campus site. Clinical courses have been arranged to accommodate the 18 students in the 4 operatories allotted to us by dividing the class into 2 groups. The American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation (ADACODA) requires a 1:6 instructor to student ratio in all pre-clinical and clinical sections. These requirements lead to high lecturer costs. The program is working on acquiring another faculty member and a larger clinical facility.


The UH Maui College Dental Advisory Committee and industry employers require dental assistants to be trained in the most current technology and equipment. Local dentists and dental supply companies have donated needed equipment and materials, grants have been secured, and students are assessed a supply fee. Despite these efforts, there remains major equipment and supply costs. Dental materials are costly and perishable.
The UH Maui College Dental Assisting program looks forward to the remodel of the existing Noi‘i building, with an estimated move in date of spring 2015. This facility will allow the UH Maui College Dental Assisting and Hygiene Programs to share 10 operatories, allowing increased space and time in the clinical area and efficiency in utilizing our lecturers.


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