Vince Coleman Former Major League All-Star Outfielder Career Highlights



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Vince Coleman

Former Major League All-Star Outfielder
Career Highlights: A former record-setting Major League outfielder with the St. Louis Cardinals, Vince Coleman led the National League in steals in his first six seasons in the league with 549 total steals from 1985 to1990…He is sixth all-time for career stolen bases with 752 and is the only player in history to steal 100 bases in three straight years… Coleman holds a Major League Baseball record with 50 consecutive stolen bases without being caught stealing (September 18, 1988 through July 26, 1989)…Coleman also holds three of the top six stolen base seasons #3 (110 in 1985), #4 (109 in 1987) and #6 (107 in 1986) as the seasons were all consecutive…A two-time All-Star, he also won three Gold Gloves for his defensive prowess in the outfield…A 13-year veteran, Coleman played for the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Mets, Kansas City Royals, Seattle Mariners, Cincinnati Reds and Detroit Tigers…Coleman played on two World Series bound teams with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1985 and 1987…He was also named the 1985 National League Rookie of the Year…Coleman posted the most stolen bases in a season by a rookie with 110 in 1985…In college, he played football and baseball at Florida A&M University where he led the NCAA in stolen bases twice, including 65 in his junior year…Coleman also earned an invitation to the Freedom Bowl All-Star game as a punter for the football team his senior year.

Mike Schmidt

Baseball Hall of Fame

Third Baseman
Career Highlights: A Hall of Fame third baseman, Mike Schmidt played for the Philadelphia Phillies his entire 18-year career…He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1995, earning a then-record 444 of a possible 460 votes…Selected to major league baseball’s “All-Century Team,” Schmidt set a vast array of hitting and fielding records during his playing career…He led the National League in home runs a record eight times, RBIs four times, and walks four times…Schmidt earned 10 Gold Gloves as the National League’s premier third baseman…He was named the National League MVP in 1980, 1981 and 1986…A 12-time All-Star, Schmidt was selected as the Player of the Decade for the 1980’s by The Sporting News…He holds several other National League records, including most games played by a third baseman (2,212) and most double plays by a third baseman (450)…Schmidt finished his career with 548 home runs and 1,595 RBIs, two of the many Phillies’ career records he holds…Other Phillies’ records include being the all-time leader in games played, at-bats, plate appearances, runs scored, hits, walks, strikeouts, sacrifices flies and several others…His uniform number 20 has been retired by the Phillies, and he has been honored with a statue outside the team’s home field, Citizens Bank Park… In 2009, Schmidt served as coach for Team USA in the World Baseball Classic He started playing golf when he first picked up his dad’s seven-iron in the backyard at age 10…Schmidt has played in 20 of the 21 celebrity tournaments in Lake Tahoe and has three top-10 finishes…His best Celebrity Players Tour finish was his runner-up finish at the 1998 Mario Lemieux Celebrity Invitational with his son, Jonathan, as his caddie, shooting a career-best opening round 67.


Rick Rhoden

Professional Golfer

Former MLB All-Star Pitcher
Career Highlights: One of only a handful of players to have played two professional sports (golf and baseball), Rick Rhoden currently is a professional golfer who pitched for 15 years in the major leagues, winning 151 games…A two-time All-Star, Rhoden played for the 1977 and 1978 National League Champion Los Angeles Dodgers…He also played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, New York Yankees and Houston Astros…One of the best hitting pitchers of his era, Rhoden won three consecutive Silver Slugger Awards (1984-86) in the National League…He was the only pitcher to start as a designated hitter…He hit .375 (15-40) for the Pirates in 1980…In 413 career games, Rhoden compiled a 151-125 record, a 3.59 ERZ, 1,419 strikeouts, and one save. He also hit nine home runs and had 75 RBIs…Rhoden was inducted into the Florida Sports Hall of Fame in 1999...After retiring from baseball in 1989, Rhoden pursued a golf career becoming a dominant player on the Celebrity Players Tour winning more than 50 titles including eight at the Lake Tahoe tournament…Since 2003, he also has played in a number of tournaments on the PGA Champions Tour and has three career top-10 finishes … A perennial tournament favorite in Lake Tahoe, Rhoden is the defending champion who has won the American Century Championship a record eight times including last year (1991, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2008, 2009), and finished second five times and third three times…He has a total of 18 top-five finishes in the tournament…Under the original format, he shot a tournament record 207 (nine-under-par) in both 1993 and 1997…In addition to the American Century Championship, Rhoden has won more than 50 Celebrity Players Tour events and is celebrity golf’s all-time winner and money leader.

Bret Saberhagen

Former Major League

All-Star Pitcher
Career Highlights: In his 16-year professional career that spanned from 1984 to 2001, Bret Saberhagen was considered among the top pitchers in major league baseball…In his second year in the league with the Kansas City Royals, the 21-year-old “Sabes” established himself as the ace of the staff, going 20-6 with a 2.87 ERA…He led the Royals to a World Series Championship over cross-state rival the St. Louis Cardinals in 1985…Saberhagen was named MVP of the Series after hurling two complete-game victories, allowing just one run in 19 innings and out dueling St. Louis ace John Tudor in an 11-0 Game 7 win…In eight seasons in Kansas City, he won 110 games and racked up two Cy Young Awards (1985 and 1989)…A three-time All-Star, Saberhagen also played with the New York Mets, Colorado Rockies and Boston Red Sox…An American League Gold Glove Award winner in 1989, he led the American League in ERA (2.16) and wins (23) that same season…He pitched a no-hitter against the Chicago White Sox in 1991…Saberhagen won numerous other awards including the Tony Conigliaro Award (1998), Sporting News Pitcher of the Year (1985, 1989) and the Babe Ruth Award (1985)…He was inducted into the Kansas City Royals Hall of Fame in 2005.

David Wells

Former MLB All-Star Pitcher
Career Highlights: All-Star pitcher David Wells is best known for being one of only 19 pitchers to have pitched a perfect game in the past 130 years of major league baseball…On May 17, 1998 while pitching for the New York Yankees, Wells shutout the Minnesota Twins 4-0…Nicknamed “Boomer” for his physique, Wells has been one of the games better left-handed pitchers, especially during his years with the New York Yankees and Toronto Blue Jays… A journeyman, Wells played for nine different teams during his 21-year career (Toronto, Detroit, Cincinnati, Baltimore, New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, San Diego, Boston, Los Angeles Dodgers)…He debuted for the Blue Jays in 1987 as a reliever and finally secured a job as a starter when he was 30 years old…A three-time All-Star, Wells won World Series Championships with the Toronto Blue Jays in 1992 and the New York Yankees in 1998…He was named the American League Championship Series MVP against the Cleveland Indians in 1998…Wells owns a career record of 239-157, including a 173-99 mark since 1995…He is 82 games over .500 for his career, a record superior to many of the finest pitchers in baseball history…His career ERA of 4.06 is better than the average for the big-hitting era in which he has had his best success…Wells posted career bests of 20 wins in a season and 169 strikeouts with the Blue Jays in 2000…Other career bests include 16 strikeouts in one game while with the Yankees against the Oakland A’s on July 30, 1997.
Ozzie Smith

Baseball Hall of Fame Shortstop
Career Highlights: Recognized as one of major league baseball’s greatest defensive players of all time, Ozzie Smith was elected into Baseball’s Hall of Fame in 2002…Nicknamed “The Wizard of Oz,” Smith won 13 consecutive Gold Glove Awards during his career at shortstop…Over the course of his 19-year career Smith earned some impressive offensive statistics as well, retiring in 1996 with 2,460 hits and 580 stolen bases…Smith made his major league debut with the San Diego Padres in 1978…Traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1982, Smith became an important part of manager Whitey Herzog’s speed and defense oriented style of baseball known as “Whiteyball”…Smith was a major contributor to the Cardinals 1982 World Series championship…As Smith became increasingly noted for his defensive accomplishments, he continued to improve his offensive capabilities, hitting a dramatic game-winning home run during Game 5 of the 1985 National League Championship Series and earned the 1985 NLCS Most Valuable Player honors…A 15-time All Star (1981-1992, 1994-1996), Smith won the 1987 Silver Slugger Award when he had a .303 batting average, 43 stolen bases, 75 RBIs, 104 runs scored, and 40 doubles…Smith’s other notable honors include the 1989 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award, 1994 Branch Rickey Award and 1995 Roberto Clemente Award for his community service efforts...Even after his playing days were over, Smith still was receiving accolades being named to The Sporting News’ list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players and finishing third in voting at shortstop for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team…Smith has also been honored with induction into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame and the St. Louis Walk of Fame, and received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Cal-Poly.

Joe Carter

Former MLB

All-Star Outfielder
Career Highlights: Joe Carter, a 16-year major league baseball veteran, is most famous for hitting a walk-off home run to win the 1993 World Series with the Toronto Blue Jays trailing 6-5 to the Philadelphia Phillies in the bottom of the ninth inning...Carter helped the Blue Jays win their first World Series title a year earlier in 1992 when he hit two home runs…Carter first reached the major leagues with the Chicago Cubs in 1983 and then was traded to the Cleveland Indians a year later…While with Cleveland (1984-89), he emerged as a prolific power hitter, hitting as many as 35 home runs in a season and regularly driving in 100 or more runs…In 1989 he spent one year with the San Diego Padres before being traded to Toronto. ..Carter spent seven years with the Blue Jays (1991-97) and during that time, in addition to the two World Series rings, he was named a five-time All-Star and a two-time Silver Slugger Award winner…He led the Blue Jays in homeruns and RBIs in 1994 and 1995…After the 1997 season Carter became a free agent and played briefly in 1998 for the Baltimore Orioles and the San Francisco Giants before retiring…In his career, Carter hit 396 home runs and drove in 1,445 RBIs…He drove in 100 runs in a season 10 times, including the 1994 year, which was cut short due to the strike…Carter was the first player to record 100 RBIs for three different teams in three consecutive seasons…Carter served as an announcer for the Toronto Blue Jays on CTV Sportsnet from 1999-2000 and then joined the Chicago Cubs broadcasting team as a color commentator, alongside play-by-play announcer Chip Carey for two seasons…He was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame, Missouri Valley Hall of Fame and the Kansas Baseball Hall of Fame…Carter also was awarded the MLB Hometown Heroes Award as the former or current player who best represents the legacy of his franchise’s history, as voted by the fans.

Kenny Lofton

Former MLB All-Star
Career Highlights: A veteran of 17 major league baseball seasons, Kenny Lofton is recognized as one of the premier lead-off hitters in the game…Lofton appeared in six consecutive All-Star games (1994-99) and won four straight Gold Glove honors while playing for the Cleveland Indians and Atlanta Braves…Drafted by the Houston Astros in the 1988 Amateur Draft, Lofton played minor league baseball during the summer while completing his basketball eligibility at the University of Arizona…In college, he was the backup point guard to Craig McMillan and Steve Kerr on the Arizona Wildcats team that made it to the Final Four of the 1988 NCAA Tournament…He was the starting point guard the following year when Arizona made it to the Sweet 16…Lofton is one of only two men to play in a college basketball Final Four and a Major League Baseball World Series (along with Tim Stoddard)… He made his major league debut with the Houston Astros in September 1991 where he posted three hits and scored three runs against the Cincinnati Reds…Traded to the Cleveland Indians during his rookie season, Lofton hit .285 and stole 66 bases establishing an all-time record for an American League rookie and the most by a Major League rookie since Vince Coleman’s 110 in 1985…Lofton finished second in the American League Rookie of the Year balloting…He played for 11 different teams throughout his career including Houston (1991), Cleveland (1992-96, 1998-2001, 2007), Atlanta (1997), Chicago White Sox (2002), San Francisco (2002), Pittsburgh (2003), Chicago Cubs (2003), New York Yankees (2004), Philadelphia (2005), Los Angeles Dodgers (2006), and Texas (2007)…Highlights of his career include five-time league leader in stolen bases, (1992-96), led league in hits (1996), led league in triples (1995) led league in at-bats (1996) and MLB record for post-season stolen bases (34)…Lofton finished his regular season career with 2,103 games played, 130 home runs, 781 RBIs, and a .299 batting average…In 95 post-season games, Lofton hit .247 with seven home runs and 34 RBIs.

Greg Maddux

Former MLB All-Star Pitcher
Career Highlights: One of the all-time greats, Greg Maddux played in the major leagues for 23 seasons and won more games during the 1990s than any other pitcher…A four-time Cy Young Award winner, Maddox was the first pitcher in major league history to win the honor for four consecutive years (1992-95), a feat matched only by Randy Johnson…During those four consecutive seasons, Maddux had a 75-29 record with a 1.98 ERA, while allowing less than one runner per inning…He is the only pitcher in MLB history to win at least 15 games for 17 straight seasons…Maddux also was awarded a record 18 Gold Gloves during his playing days…A superb control pitcher, Maddux is eighth on the all-time career win list with 355 – since the start of the post-1920 live ball era, only Warren Spahn (363) had more career wins than Maddux…Maddux was drafted in the second round of the 1984 Major League Draft by the Chicago Cubs, where he spent the first seven years of his career (1986-1992)…In 1988, he won 18 games, thus started his string of winning at least 15 wins a year for 17 consecutive seasons…Maddux won 20 games in 1992, tied for the National League lead and was voted his first Cy Young Award…Maddux became a free agent and signed with the Atlanta Braves where he debuted with a 20-10 record in 1993, collected his second Cy Young Award and led the National League in ERA for the first time (2.36)…In the strike-shortened 1994 season, Maddux posted an ERA of 1.56, the second lowest since Bob Gibson’s historic 1.12 in 1968 and followed that with a 19-2 season and a 1.63 ERA in 1995, the third-lowest ever…That season, the Braves went on to win the World Series title…Overall, from 1993-98, Maddux led the National League in ERA four times and was second the other two seasons…Maddux pitched together for over a decade with Tom Glavine and John Smoltz, forming one of the best pitching staffs in the history of the game…Maddux returned to the Cubs, followed by time with the Los Angeles Dodgers, San Diego Padres and then back to the Dodgers….Maddux was chosen to the All-Star team eight times…He pitched in 13 Division Series contests, 17 League Championship games and five World Series games…Maddux posted a 3.27 ERA in 198 post-season innings, including an outstanding 2.09 ERA in 38.7 World Series innings….Since retirement in December 2008, Maddux joined the Chicago Cubs as a Special Assistant to General Manager Jim Hendry.

John Smoltz

Former MLB All-Star Pitcher
Career Highlights: Cy Young Award pitcher John Smoltz is best known for his prolific career with the Atlanta Braves where he garnered eight MLB All-Star selections…Smoltz, who spent 20 years with the Braves, is the only pitcher in major league history to top both 200 wins and 150 saves…His best year with the Braves was in 1996 when he went 24-8 with a 2.94 ERZ and 276 strikeouts (a Braves all-time record), including winning a franchise record 14 straight decisions…Smoltz won the National League Cy Young with 26 of 28 first-place votes…That season he set both the Atlanta Braves record for most wins in a season and led the National League in wins (24)….Counting his wins in the playoffs and All-Star Game, Smoltz amazed 29 wins in 1996, the only higher such total in the last 70 years is Denny McLain who had 32 in 1968…Predominately known as a starting pitcher, Smoltz spent three years as the team’s closer from 2002 through 2004 (following recovery from Tommy John surgery)…In 2002 he became only the second pitcher in history to have had both a 20-win season and a 50-save season (only with Hall of Famer Dennis Eckersley)…He became the 16th member of the 3,000 Strikeout Club on April 22, 2008 when he fanned Felipe Lopez of the Washington Nationals…Smoltz holds numerous Atlanta Braves records including: most saves in a career (154); most saves in a season (2002, with 55); most strikeouts in a season (276); and most strikeouts in a career (3,011)…Smoltz won a World Series title with the Braves in 1995… Other accolades for Smoltz include: eight-time All-Star (1989, 1992, 1993, 1996, 2002, 2002, 2005, 2007), 1992 National League Championship Series MVP, 1997 Silver Slugger Award Winner for Pitcher; 2007 Branch Rickey Award for exceptional community service…Smoltz spent the 2009 season, the 21st of his major league career, in both Boston and Saint Louis….In his Cardinals debut on August 19, 2009, against the San Diego Padres, Smoltz went five innings, striking out nine and walking none, while setting a franchise record by striking out seven batters in a row…His career statistics include a 213-155 win-loss record, 3.33 ERA, 3,084 strikeouts and 154 saves…Currently Smoltz is a color analyst alongside Joe Simpson for several Braves games on Peachtree TV.

Mark Mulder

Former MLB All-Star Pitcher
Career Highlights: Mark Mulder is a two-time All-Star pitcher with the Oakland Athletics and Saint Louis Cardinals…Selected by Oakland with the second overall pick in the 1998 Major League Baseball Draft out of Michigan State University, Mulder was placed on the fast track to the major leagues…He played less than two years in the minors and made his major league debut at age 22 in April 2000…In 2001, Mulder played his first full season and quickly became a dominant pitcher leading the American league with 21 wins…He was in contention for the Cy Young Award and anchored a powerful Oakland pitching rotation along with Barry Zito and Tim Hudson, called “The Big Three”…The following season he was equally as strong winning 19 games and striking out a career-high 159 batters…The following season he was limited by injuries having only 26 starts, yet still won 15 games and had a career-best 3.13 ERA…Mulder, Hudson and Zito led the Athletics to the postseason four years in a row, from 2000 to 2003…Mulder competed in the playoffs in 2001 and 2002, logging two starts each against the New York Yankees and Minnesota Twins and carrying over his strong performance by pitching 24 innings in the four playoff stars, with an ERA of 2.25 and 19 strikeouts…In his first four years in the league with Oakland, Mulder posted a 71-42 record with 66 strikeouts…He was named to two All-Star games in 2003 and 2004…Mulder led the American League in complete games in 2003 (9) and 2004 (5) and led in shutouts in 2001 (4) and 2003 (2)…Mulder was traded to the Saint Louis Cardinals in December 2004…Unfortunately, he was plagued by injuries when he played for the Cardinals (2005-2008) where he suffered from rotator cuff and shoulder problems – only playing a total of six games his final two seasons.


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