World congress on middle eastern studies (wocmes)



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29/06/2009

WORLD CONGRESS ON MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES (WOCMES)


Barcelona, 19-24 July 2010 - http://wocmes.iemed.org/en/home/
Panel on the Political Economy of New Tourism Mobilities in the MENA Region
Organisers:
Dr. Ala Al-Hamarneh – University of Mainz– Germany

a.al-hamarneh@geo.uni-mainz.de


Professor Kevin Hannam – University of Sunderland– UK

Kevin.hannam@sunderland.ac.uk


Dr Marcus Stephenson – Middlesex University Dubai - UAE

m.stephenson@mdx.ac


Call for Papers

The journal Mobilities states that contemporary “mobilities encompasse both the large-scale movements of people, objects, capital, and information across the world, as well as more local processes of daily transportation, movement through public space, and the travel of material things within everyday life. Recent developments in transportation and communications infrastructures, along with new social and cultural practices of mobility have elicited a number of new research initiatives for understanding the connections between these diverse mobilities.”


In the last ten years new trends and dynamics of tourism mobilities in the MENA region have been noticed: the boom of intra-regional tourisms, the dramatic increase in intra-regional FDI in tourism services, neo-liberal urban restructuring of tourism places and spaces, the establishment of various new intraregional transportation infrastructure and so on. While numerous trends have been driven by decisions taken at the political level, others express growing profit-oriented investments strategies. For example Libyan investments in Tunisia and Egypt are seen as a result of the new political orientation of the country.
Beyond investments, the visa-issuing policies and the establishment of new transportation infrastructures reflect new tourism regulatory frameworks that need to be examined. For example, on the one hand, Iranians cannot travel to Egypt and Jordan due to visa restrictions, but they are more than welcome in the UAE, Syria and Iraq. Turkey and Lebanon have established a no-visa regime for visitors from GCC countries and Jordan.
Furthermore, new developments in communications have also elicited new intraregional connections between both migrants and tourists within and outside the MENA region. Such connections are, of course, emphatically gendered as well as structured by different ethnic backgrounds and shared heritages. These heritages bring to the fore the material nature of many tourism mobilities in terms of the movement of everyday things that become important to sustain the political economy of tourism.
This panel thus aims to discuss from a political economy perspective the various new tourism mobilities in the MENA region and seeks submissions that take up the above dimensions in order to explore the diverse economic, communicational, material and migrational experiences of tourism mobilities. To participate please send a short abstract of 300 words by email to one of the organizer(s) by the 15th October 2009. All abstracts will be refereed.
25/06/2009

3rd International Conference on Mediterranean Studies


Athens, Greece, 31 March-3 April 2010
For further information see the conference website: http://www.atiner.gr/docs/Mediterranean.htm

Deadline to submit: 5th of October 2009.


22/06/2009

"British Society for Middle Eastern Studies Graduate Conference"


Exeter, UK, 03-04 September 2009
Fifth annual gathering of graduate students in Middle Eastern Studies to be held at the Institute for Arab and Islamic Studies, University of Exeter.
Papers accepted from all disciplines. Keynote speaker: Professor Carole Hillenbrand.
For further information, contact the conference team at brismes2009@ex.ac.uk; or visit: http://huss.exeter.ac.uk/iais/all-events/conferences/BRISMES/index.php

17/06/2009

"Tourism, Religion & Culture: Regional Development through Meaningful Tourism Experiences"
First announcement on a new upcoming International Conference and Call for Papers.

To be held 27th -30th October 2009 in LECCE, ITALY


The conference is organized by the University of Salento (Lecce) in cooperation with:

• University of Bologna, Italy,

• University of Haifa, Israel,

• University of Munich, Germany and

• ATLAS

For further details about the Conference, please visit the conference website at http://www.tourismreligionandculture.eu


15/06/2009

Tourism, Culture and Territorial Development: Strategies to Develop Local & Regional Tourism
31st August - 5th September 2009
2009 International Summer School in Geography of Tourism
http://www.economiarimini.unibo.it/Economia+Rimini/Didattica/Summer+e+winter+school/Summer+School+2009/Summer_School_-_Territorial_development.htm http://www.economiarimini.unibo.it/Economia+Rimini/Didattica/Summer+e+winter+school/Summer+School+2009

12/06/2009

Conference: "La Frontière Méditerranéenne du 15e au 17e siècle. Échanges, circulations et affrontements"
June 17-20, 2009, Université François Rabelais, Tours, France
The aim of this international conference is to discover the underlying interactive processes in the Mediterranean in local and global perspective in the period from the 15th to 17th centuries looking especially at geopolitics, the role of intermediaries, ideologies and culture.
The conference is organised by the Equipe Monde Arabe et Méditerranée (CITERES-EMAM) in cooperation with the Centre d'études supérieures de la Renaissance (CESR). The Conference program is now available on the website http://citeres.univ-tours.fr//actu/actu53/frontiere.pdf. For further information: albrecht.fuess@univ-tours.fr.

9/06/2009

Seventh International Conference on the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility (T^2 M)
Lucerne, Switzerland | November 5–8, 2009
CALL FOR PAPERS
– Energy and Innovation –
The International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and

Mobility (T^2 M) invites proposals for papers to be presented at its

Seventh International Conference to be held at the Verkehrshaus der

Schweiz (Swiss Museum of Transport), Lucerne, Switzerland from November

5^th till the 8^th , 2009.
The conference is organised by historians from different universities as

well as by the Swiss Museum of Transport. Switzerland’s most visited

museum celebrates its 50^th anniversary in 2009 and is being rebuilt and

expanded for this occasion at the time. This year the conference theme

is Energy and Innovation’. The CfP ask for papers to this thematic

field but it is at the same time open to all subjects in the history of

transport, traffic, and mobility. The language of the conference is English.
Traffic is motion and therefore energy is imperative. It doesn’t matter

what, how or where to one moves – performance, or the conversion of

energy into motion, is always preconditioned. The modernisation of

traffic since the 18^th century can be seen as a process in the course

of which means of transport that relied in the end on solar energy were

replaced by means of transport that relied on nonrenewable energy. Thus,

the focus was shifted from the likes of walking, rowing, sailing,

horseback riding and the usage of animal traction to mechanical means of

transport such as the steam engine, the combustion engine and rocket

propulsion.Where did the question of energy figure in the acceleration

and intensification of traffic? Where in the choice of a means of

transport, in the question ‘street or ship’? How was energy efficiency

for new machines increased? Conversely, how was their environmental

pollution reduced? Why did one choose a specific propulsion? How did the

price of energy affect the price of transport and mobility? How big was

the influence of private traffic and energy business thereby, how great

the weight of governmental politics?
According to economist Joseph Schumpeter, innovations are elementary

improvements that shake the economy and the community which means in

this case that they produce new means of transport such as train, car or

plane. Which economical, social, cultural and political conditions

leveraged which means of transport? Innovations never were the result of

mere business calculations and engineering efforts. Behind those were

always sociocultural factors such as the ideology of freedom, the

appetite for adventure and discovery or the play instinct and surge for

fame. Also, new combinations of existing means of transport could lead

to innovation.


Proposals which connect the two conference topics (energy and

innovation) are eminently favoured: How was the velocity of a means of

transport increased without a multiplication of energy consumption? Do

new means of transport prevail mainly in times of war and crisis? Could

premodern and antiquated means of transport increase their efficiency

under the pressure of competition of new modes of drive as for example

the fast sailing ships that came up under the pressure of the steam boat

around 1850? Is a renaissance of premodern and environmentally sound

means of transport imaginable?
Participants are encouraged, though not required, to organize panels on

these themes. A panel consists of a chair and normally up to three

speakers; no commentator is required. We especially encourage

transnational, comparative and transmodal approaches, and welcome

proposals exploring theoretical or methodological issues as well as

those of a more empirical nature. Relevant contributions are welcome

from historians as well as from cultural geographers, sociologists,

anthropologists, economists, and other scholars who do not define

themselves as historians. We especially invite recent entrants to the

profession and doctoral students to submit proposals.


T^2 M 2009 wants to invest more energy into communication. *Posters of

all oral presentations will be exhibited in the public area of

Switzerland’s most visited museum. *This innovation will contribute to

better promotion of the history of transport, traffic and mobility as a

scientific discipline and as a public service. Submission of a fully

completed poster form (1 page A4) is mandatory for all speakers. Posters

will be judged. Poster forms will be made available later on the website

of the programme committee.


6/06/2009

Eleventh Session of the Mediterranean Research Meeting
Florence, Italy, 24-27 March 2010
The Mediterranean Programme of the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies at the European University Institute (Italy) has issued a Call for Papers for the eleventh session of the Mediterranean Research Meeting.
Applications must be submitted electronically by 15 July 2009.
All relevant details are available on the Mediterranean Research Meeting web page www.eui.eu/RSCAS/Research/Mediterranean/mrm2010/

3/06/2009

New issue of the journal Mobilities
Mobilities: Volume 4 Issue 2 is now available online at informaworld

http://www.informaworld.com


The new issue contains the following articles:
Security and Belonging: Reconceptualising Aboriginal Spatial Mobilities

in Yamatji Country, Western Australia,

Author: Sarah Prout
Connected: Exploring the Extraordinary Demand for Telecoms Services in

Post-collapse Somalia,

Author: Greg Collins
Taking Sacred Space out of Place: From Mount Sinai to Mount Getty

Through Travelling Icons,

Author: Veronica della Dora
Repetitive Visiting as a Pre-return Transnational Strategy among

Youthful Trinidadian Returnees,

Authors: Dennis Conway; Robert B. Potter; Godfrey St. Bernard
Driven to Care: The Car, Automobility and Social Work,

Author: Harry Ferguson


26/05/2009

New Book: Mobilities and Inequality
Edited by Timo Ohnmacht, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Switzerland, Hanja Maksim, Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne, Switzerland and Manfred Max Bergman, University of Basle, Switzerland
This book opens up the debate on the interrelations between space and mobilities with regard to different dimensions of social inequality. Based on the premise that the dynamics caused by modernization, globalization, migration and social change affect the structuring of the social fabric, the focus of the book is to illuminate these processes of social and spatial re-structurings. A leading team of contributors from the Cosmobilities network highlight different aspects of inequality in relation to mobilities, such as gender, supplying transport infrastructure, job-related relocations, multi-locality, social network geography, and socio-spatial development.
Contents: Foreword; Introduction: mobilities and inequality, Timo Ohnmacht, Hanja Maksim and Manfred Max Bergman; Part I Theory, Concepts, and Findings on Mobilities and Inequality: Mobilities and inequality - making connections, Timo Ohnmacht, Hanja Maksim and Manfred Max Bergman; Unequal mobilities, Katharina Manderscheid; Life-course inequalities in the globalisation process, Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Sandra Buchholz and Dirk Hofäcker; Metaphors of mobility - inequality on the move, Jonas Larsen and Michael Hviid Jacobsen. Part II Empirical Applications: Mobilities and social network geography: size and spatial dispersion - the Zurich case study, Andreas Frei, Kay W. Axhausen and Timo Ohnmacht; Social integration faced with commuting: more widespread and less dense support networks, Gil Viry, Vincent Kaufmann and Eric D. Widmer; Here, there, and in-between: on the interplay of multilocal living space and inequality, Nicola Hilti; Class divides within transnationalisation - the German population and its cross-border practices, Steffen Mau and Jan Mewes; Residential location, mobility and the city: mediating and reproducing social inequity, Markus Hesse and Joachim Scheiner; Mobility and the promotion of public transport in Johannesburg, Ursula Scheidegger; Index.
SEE FULL CONTENTS LIST: http://www.ashgate.com/pdf/SamplePages/Mobilities_and_Inequality_Cont.pdf

READ INTRODUCTION: http://www.ashgate.com/pdf/SamplePages/Mobilities_and_Inequality_Intro.pdf

ORDER BOOK FROM PUBLSIHER WITH PRICE REDUCTION: http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&calctitle=1&pageSubject=429&lang=cy&title_id=10359&edition_id=11588

22/05/2009

New Book: Mobility in Daily Life
Why do we choose specific modes of transport and what are the perceived rationalities for our choice? How are different theoretical concepts within mobility research actually perceived and lived in everyday life? At this book's core is a conceptual and empirical contribution to critical mobility research. It focuses on the tension between freedom and unfreedom, articulated through the dichotomy between individuality and community, as well as critical perspectives on the multitude of unintended consequences of mobility. In a range of everyday life narratives, this tension is analyzed through the concept of 'structural stories'. In teasing out the ambivalences of late modern everyday life, Malene Freudendal-Pedersen exposes how mobility both generates and helps to overcome and live with these ambivalences.
Author

Dr Malene Freudendal-Pedersen, Department for Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Denmark


http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mobility-Daily-Life-Transport-Society/dp/0754674908/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1245440569&sr=8-1

19/05/2009

New Book: A World I Loved
A memoir by Wadad Makdisi, Beiruti citizen and mother in law of Edward Said. Her accounts viviedly illustrate how partition disrupted daily and seasonal mobilities in the Levant, especially between Beirut and Jerusalem.
‘There can be few commentaries that convey so vividly such a relentless, tragically unfolding history, while also offering such a fierce celebration of the diversity of Lebanese life. The Arab world loved by Makdisi Cortas, a world of Muslims, Christians and Jews where there were ‘no strangers’ can still provide a model and hope for the future.’

Jaqueline Rose, Queen Mary, University of London


http://www.amazon.co.uk/World-I-Loved-Story-Woman/dp/1568584296/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1245483683&sr=8-2

17/05/2009

Cosmobilities Session at RC21/ ISA: Urban futures and mobility regimes

International Sociological Association Annual Conference, Gotenburg | 11-17 July 2010


Organizers: Javier Caletrío, Lancaster University, UK, j.caletrio@lancaster.ac.uk

and Katharina Manderscheid, Lancaster University, UK, k.manderscheid@lancaster.ac.uk


Peak oil and climate change have brought to the fore the centrality of mobility to social and economic life and the urgent pressures to develop alternative mobilities. Hosting half the world’s population, cities are increasingly important actors in achieving low carbon futures and privileged sites where the moral dilemmas of modern techno-utopias are being rehearsed. In the context of transport, urban futures are haunted between idyllic visions of clean, just and democratised mobilities such as those projected by Dongtan ecocity in China and present and future dystopias of splintering urbanisms, ever growing slums, large scale infrastructural collapse and climate related disasters. This session explores futures of urban mobilities paying special attention to (i) what kind of mobilities futures are being created by current techno-social developments; (ii) the performative role of expectations and hope in shaping urban mobility regimes (iii) the connected understandings of social inequality and mobility justice, and (iv) what social and cultural forms are implied in visions of future mobilities.

http://www.isa-sociology.org/congress2010/rc/rc21.htm


16/05/2009

Le séminaire "Tourisme : Recherches , Institutions, Pratiques"

EHESS, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme de Paris, séminaire associé au IIAC, équipe LAIOS.


Saskia Cousin (IIAC-LAIOS / CITERES, anthropologue, mcf à l’Université François-Rabelais); Bertrand Réau (CRIS, mcf à l’Université de Lyon-I); Sylvain Pattieu (historien, Paris 8. | 1er et 3e jeudis du mois de 17 h à 19 h (salle 215, 54 bd Raspail, sauf le 27/11, en salle 007),du 16 octobre au 18 juin.
Renseignements : saskia.cousin@univ-tours.fr
Pour la quatrième année, nous poursuivons notre exploration des recherches menées sur le tourisme. Il s’agira toujours croiser les terrains et les approches disciplinaires, en donnant cette année une place plus importante aux historiens et aux géographes. Nous avons également voulu faire mieux connaître les recherches menées à l’étranger, tant du point de vue des méthodes et des concepts, qu’en termes d’organisation scientifique. 6 chercheurs nous aideront à faire le point sur ce sujet. Comme chaque année, nous alternerons les interventions de chercheurs confirmés et de doctorants. Les séances seront organisées autour de la présentation d’un ou de deux intervenant (s), suivie d’une mise en perspective avec un discutant, et d’une discussion avec les participants.

Ce séminaire est associé au LAIOS. Il est ouvert à toutes les personnes qui s’intéressent à la recherche sur le tourisme et les mobilités de loisirs.


7 mai : Simone Abram, Université de Leeds, CTCC (Royaume-Uni) : « Movement, Nature and Nationalism: understanding the significance of holiday homes ».
- Tim Neal, Université de Sheffield (Royaume-Uni) : « The perfect place : situating British migrants in rural France »
28 mai : Pal Nyiri, Université libre d'Amsterdam (Pays-Bas) : « Tourism and Modernity in China »
4 juin : Pascal Ory, Université de Paris 1 : « Retour sur l'invention du bronzage »
18 juin : Maria Gravari-Barbas, Université de Paris 1, EIREST : « Temps et espaces de l’événement urbain ».

2/05/2009

Seventh International Conference on the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility (T2M)
Lucerne, Switzerland | November 5–8, 2009

CALL FOR PAPERS - Energy and Innovation -


The International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility (T2M) invites proposals for papers to be presented at its Seventh International Conference to be held at the Verkehrshaus der Schweiz (Swiss Museum of Transport), Lucerne, Switzerland from November 5th till the 8th, 2009.

The conference is organised by historians from different universities as well as by the Swiss Museum of Transport. Switzerland’s most visited museum celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2009 and is being rebuilt and expanded for this occasion at the time. This year the conference theme is Energy and Innovation’. The CfP asks for papers in this thematic field but it is at the same time open to all subjects in the history of transport, traffic, and mobility. The language of the conference is English.

Traffic is motion and therefore energy is imperative. It doesn’t matter what, how or where to one moves – performance, or the conversion of energy into motion, is always preconditioned. The modernisation of traffic since the 18th century can be seen as a process in the course of which means of transport that relied in the end on solar energy were replaced by means of transport that relied on nonrenewable energy. Thus, the focus was shifted from the likes of walking, rowing, sailing, horseback riding and the usage of animal traction to mechanical means of transport such as the steam engine, the combustion engine and rocket propulsion.Where did the question of energy figure in the acceleration and intensification of traffic? Where in the choice of a means of transport, in the question ‘street or ship’? How was energy efficiency for new machines increased? Conversely, how was their environmental pollution reduced? Why did one choose a specific propulsion? How did the price of energy affect the price of transport and mobility? How big was the influence of private traffic and energy business thereby, how great the weight of governmental politics?

According to economist Joseph Schumpeter, innovations are elementary improvements that shake the economy and the community which means in this case that they produce new means of transport such as train, car or plane. Which economical, social, cultural and political conditions leveraged which means of transport? Innovations never were the result of mere business calculations and engineering efforts. Behind those were always sociocultural factors such as the ideology of freedom, the appetite for adventure and discovery or the play instinct and surge for fame. Also, new combinations of existing means of transport could lead to innovation.

Proposals which connect the two conference topics (energy and innovation) are eminently favoured: How was the velocity of a means of transport increased without a multiplication of energy consumption? Do new means of transport prevail mainly in times of war and crisis? Could premodern and antiquated means of transport increase their efficiency under the pressure of competition of new modes of drive as for example the fast sailing ships that came up under the pressure of the steam boat around 1850? Is a renaissance of premodern and environmentally sound means of transport imaginable?

Participants are encouraged, though not required, to organize panels on these themes. A panel consists of a chair and normally up to three speakers; no commentator is required. We especially encourage transnational, comparative and transmodal approaches, and welcome proposals exploring theoretical or methodological issues as well as those of a more empirical nature. Relevant contributions are welcome from historians as well as from cultural geographers, sociologists, anthropologists, economists, and other scholars who do not define themselves as historians. We especially invite recent entrants to the profession and doctoral students to submit proposals.


T2M 2009 wants to invest more energy into communication. Posters of all oral presentations will be exhibited in the public area of Switzerland’s most visited museum. This innovation will contribute to better promotion of the history of transport, traffic and mobility as a scientific discipline and as a public service. Submission of a fully completed poster form (1 page A4) is mandatory for all speakers. Posters will be judged. Poster forms will be made available later on the website of the programme committee.

The deadline for abstracts and a short CV (max one page each; Word or rich text format only) is the 15th April, 2009. Session proposals should also include a one-page overview of the session. Please send proposals to: t2m_content@verkehrshaus.ch. Submitters will be notified by the programme committee during the first week of May 2009 on the success or status of their submission. The full paper of all accepted submissions and of the posters must be delivered on or before August 15th, 2009. These papers will be copied onto a conference CD-ROM for distribution in advance to all conference participants. Individual presentations at the conference are therefore to be limited to a fifteen-minute summary to allow for debate and discussion within the session. All participants are required to register.

For details of T2M and of previous conferences, please visit: www.t2m.org. Further details of the conference (including the poster form) will be posted on a website of the Programme Committee which is currently under construction and will go online later.
Programme Committee:

Laurent Tissot (University of Neuchâtel) (Chair); Stéphanie von Erlach (sbb historic/Bern); Ueli Haefeli (University of Bern); Gisela Huerlimann (University of Zurich/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology); Christoph Maria Merki (University of Bern); This Oberhaensli (Swiss Museum of Transport); Christian Pfister (University of Bern); Hans-Ulrich Schiedt (ViaStoria/University of Bern); Henry Wydler (Swiss Museum of Transport)

Scientific Committee (for paper acceptance):

Laurent Tissot (University of Neuchâtel), Gisela Huerlimann (University of Zurich/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology); Hans-Liudger Dienel (Berlin University of Technology, Germany), Garth Wilson (Canada Science and Technology Museum, Ottawa/Canada).


09/05/2009

7th International Symposium on Tourism and Sustainability - TRAVEL & TOURISM IN THE AGE OF CLIMATE CHANGE - Robust Findings, Key Uncertainties
8th-10th July 2009
http://www.brighton.ac.uk/ssm/research/symposia/2009/index.php?PageId=750
Invited guest speakers:

Geoffry Lipman, UNWTO Assistant Secretary-General

Mark Lynas, award-winning freelance writer on climate change
At a time of increasing mobility, ease of travel and the emergence of new destinations, tourism is both a victim of, and contributor to climate change. However, this symbiotic relationship remains shrouded in fuzzy data, myths and mystery. Given that the industry servicing ‘people on the move’ is central to most economies and cultures, the option to ‘give up’ tourism is simply not tenable. Responsive actions must be identified to enable travel and tourism to deliver the peak experiences that tourists seek, but with a lower carbon footprint.
Industry perspectives, full papers, presentations, work in progress, and posters are invited under the following themes:
1. Climate change at the moment of financial crisis
2. Innovative approaches in adaptation and mitigation processes and protocols
3. Reducing ‘Hotspot’ Vulnerability (i.e. destinations affected by and /or dependent on tourism)
4. Emerging generating and receiving countries
5. The controversial nature of Media and Marketing
6. Supply Chain contributors (i.e. tour operators, airlines and other means of transport, accommodation, attractions, tourism corporations and local producers)
7. Educational providers (i.e capacity building and knowledge management)
8. The role of Destination Management Organizations (DMOs)
9. The role of NGOs
10. The climate change challenge for developing countries/majority world
We are particularly interested in strategic approaches to bridging the gaps between climate change and poverty alleviation (i.e. is it possible to capture the inevitable changes in the shape of tourism over the coming decades to the benefit of the developing/ majority world?)

For more information contact: tourism-climatechange@brighton.ac.uk


7/05/2009

CALL FOR PAPERS: Conference on development and ICT
Extended deadline: 8 of May, 2009
The Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (Open University of Catalonia, UOC) is pleased to invite you to participate in the Conference on Development and Information Technologies. Mobile Phones and Internet in Latin America and Africa:

What benefits for the most disadvantaged?


The Conference, organized by the UOC and cofinanced by the Agència Catalana de Cooperació al Desenvolupament, will take place on 23 and 24 October at the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3) located in Castelldefels, Barcelona.
It will be an excellent opportunity to exchange the results of empirical research and to debate the influence that the spread of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), specifically mobile phones and Internet, can have on social and economic development in Latin America and Africa, and among the most vulnerable segments of the population in particular.
We are pleased to announce to researchers, PhD students and practitioners the call for research papers on the following topics:
1. Migrations, interconnection and interdependence

2. New communicative habits: family and interpersonal relationships

3. Technologies and entrepreneurship

4. Communications at the bottom of the pyramid: access strategies

5. Mobile communications and development: microeconomic perspective

6. E-banking, access to financial services,

etc.: local use and remittances
If you are interested in presenting a paper, please send the abstract before the 8 of May,

2009 (24 April), highlighting which category the paper belongs to. Accepted papers will be published in book form, (with ISBN). Please find the instructions below.


If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the organizing committee: jornadesitd.in3@uoc.edu
Information about all the practical aspects and the contents are available on the Conference website: http://www.uoc.edu/activitats/jornadaitd/eng/index.html
Mireia Fernández-Ardèvol | Scientific Committee | mfernandezar@uoc.edu

Researcher | IN3 - Internet Interdisciplinary Institute | Universitat Oberta de Catalunya

www.uoc.edu | Av. Tibidabo, 47 | 08035 Barcelona | Tel. +34 93 253 57 55 | Fax. +34 93 211 01 26
INSTRUCTIONS

All the documents must be sent to the following email address: jornadesitd.in3@uoc.edu

Preferred formats: *.doc (MS Word), *.odf (Open Office Writer), and PDF.

Abstract Information to be sent: | 1. Title | 2. The name and affiliation of all the

authors/writers and the authors’ contact details are required. | 3. Keywords (up to 4)

4. Summary (300-500 words) | 5. Subject area:


1. Migrations, interconnection and interdependence

2. New communicative habits: family and interpersonal relationships

3. Technologies and entrepreneurship

4. Communications at the bottom of the pyramid: access strategies

5. Mobile communications and development: microeconomic perspective

6. E-banking, access to financial services, etc.: local use and remittances


Please, send the abstract before the 8 of May,

2009 , indicating JDTIC-BCN: submissions in the subject line.


5/05/2009

Appel à Communications – Construire la Méditerrannée
Colloque du Département de Géographie de Sousse | 28-29-30 Janvier 2010
Entre la vision braudelienne d’une Méditerranée « personnage complexe, encombrant, hors série, (qui) échappe à nos mesures et à nos catégories.. » et l’idée d’une Méditerranée, qui selon Edgar Morin « n’existe que dans nos subjectivités » la géographie est invitée enfin à se prononcer. Car, à part l’étiquette climatique qui a été fortement mise en avant, la géographie classique, exception faite des écrits d’Elisée Reclus, a préféré ignorer la Méditerrané, au pire l’oublier. La reconstruction théorique et thématique de la géographie depuis une trentaine d’années, quant à elle, ne s’est penchée que très peu sur l’objet « Méditerranée» même si par endroits quelques sérieuses réflexions auguraient d’un regain d’intérêt. A l’évidence, la Méditerranée en tant que concept spatial plausible à été victime de deux préjugés : la géographie classique (française) et sur fond d’un préjugé culturel discutable, n’a jamais vu dans la Méditerranée qu’une mer faite par et pour l’Europe. La récupération de l’expression « mare nostrum » non comme forme d’appropriation mais comme épithète triviale exprime très bien cette forte tendance à l’occultation dont la Méditerranée a longtemps fait l’objet. Deuxièmement, la tendance, lourde chez une partie de la nouvelle littérature géographique à ne voir dans les espaces que leur dimension géopolitique a été à l’origine de l’expression «une Méditerranée, mur mitoyen », oxymoron qui en finit prématurément avec toute réflexion théorique possible. Ces deux préjugés se prolongent dans la production géographique d’aujourd’hui dans l’usage qu’on fait habituellement de la catégorie d’analyse « Nord/Sud » où, dans le cas de son application sur la Méditerranée, la primauté est donnée aux relations de confrontations et aux formes conflictuelles. Pourtant, cette catégorie prise dans son acception large, signifie aussi l’ensemble des rapports de médiation qui produisent de nouveaux acteurs et de nouveaux lieux avec une relecture totale des distances (économiques, culturelles, sociales…) et des logiques d’espacement.

Dans la perspective qui est la nôtre, la pertinence de la « Méditerranée» en tant qu’objet de réflexion et de recherche réside dans le fait qu’il constitue un espace d’action d’une grande originalité où les aspects d’une mondialisation « immanente » et multiforme (le foyer touristique le plus important, délocalisations des industries et des services) cohabitaient avec celle d’un autre « désir du monde » qui se fait d’une façon beaucoup plus périlleuse à travers des migrations clandestines dont le volume des flux s’intensifie de plus en plus.

Les actions se déclinent aussi dans des expériences de développement et d’aménagement qui ont produit et façonné des types d’espaces « penchés » sur la Méditerranée. La littoralisation, modèle spatial récurrent sur les deux rives témoigne de la place qu’occupe la façade maritime dans l’organisation et le fonctionnement des espaces urbains méditerranéens et leur évolution vers la métropolisation.

Espace d’action(s), la Méditerranée est aussi un espace en action dont la dimension spatiale se forge et se reproduit selon quelques déterminants puissants. D’abord quelques tropismes forts où se conjuguent des écosystèmes fragiles, un différentiel de développement Nord/Sud qui ne cesse de se creuser et de s’amplifier, des configurations/combinaisons géopolitiques pesantes et fortement indurées. Ensuite quelques inflexions qui, sans être définitives, méritent qu’on s’y attarde : depuis une vingtaine d’années la Méditerranée est devenue, chez une partie des élites politiques et économiques, un espace de projet(s) indispensable. Du processus de Barcelone (1995) et ses visées géo-économiques à l’Union pour la Méditerranée (2008) en passant par les programmes sectoriels de préservation du patrimoine naturel méditerranéen, de développement et d’aménagement urbain, la Méditerranée, comme catégorie géographique, apparaît comme un possible espace de projet et/ou de projets.

Ainsi, l’objectif de ce colloque est de mettre en évidence, à partir de ces deux constats d’action et de projet, et selon des échelles et des temporalités multiples, les processus d’interaction et d’interactivité faisant de la Méditerranée un espace d’action et de probable construction et ce autour des quatre thèmes suivants sur lesquels nous invitons les spécialistes de l’analyse des dimensions spatiales des sociétés à réfléchir :

1- Représentations de la Méditerranée : spatialité(s) et imaginaires géographiques.

Qu’ils soient des fictions cinématographiques, des productions littéraires, des affiches publicitaires ou des manuels scolaires, les représentations de la Méditerranée évoquent, à travers des récits sur les lieux, les espaces et les territoires, des lectures sur les spatialités méditerranéennes qu’il serait utile de dévoiler et de questionner. Ainsi, entre Salambo de Flaubert, et le rivage des Syrtes de Julien Gracq mués en lieux imaginaires en passant par la peinture de Cézanne ou, sur un autre registre, les images très médiatiques des policiers du Lampedusa accueillant des migrants clandestins, la Méditerranée se fait paraître, à travers ses dimensions spatiales, au point d’être un espace à part. Que constituent alors ces représentations, quelles matérialités évoqueraient-elles et quelles dimensions idéelles mobiliseraient-elles?

2- La Méditerranée ; espace-patrimoine : Enjeux environnementaux pour des écosystèmes sans cesse bouleversés par les hommes.

Les milieux « naturels » non transformés par les hommes n’existent pratiquement plus en Méditerranée. Modifiés depuis la « révolution » du Néolithique et soumis à des pressions sans équivalent ailleurs, ils subissent encore aujourd’hui des mutations sensibles dans leur structure et leur fonctionnement. Qu’il s’agisse des plages et des systèmes dunaires qui leurs sont associés, des côtes rocheuses escarpées, des espaces insulaires, des zones humides littorales, des plaines alluviales et deltaïques, des milieux forestiers et autres milieux spécifiques ; les écosystèmes méditerranéens sont en forte prise avec des formes de dégradation. Devenues facteurs de déséquilibre, elles posent avec acuité deux problèmes, celui de l’adéquation entre les ressources et les modes d’habiter consommateurs d’espace, et celui relatif à la mise en place de stratégies intégrant développement et actions prévenant les risques « naturels » et assurant la régénération des ressources. Abordée sous l’angle d’un patrimoine naturel commun ou mémoire(s) de la Méditerranée, la question environnementale est ici replacée dans un cadre plus large, celui de l’évolution et de la pérennité de l’habiter méditerranéen et son agencement dans un contexte climatique changeant et dont les effets remarquables méritent d’être mieux élucidés.

3- Les vecteurs d’un espace mondialisé : mobilité, développement et métropolisation.

Existe-il un modèle de peuplement propre à la Méditerranée ? Comment l’appréhender en relation avec la donne du développement économique et sociale en recomposition ? Au niveau des caractéristiques générales de la localisation de la population et des activités la tendance, sur les deux rives à la consolidation des espaces métropolitains achève un long processus de littoralisation qui nous fait rappeler les vieilles structures géohistoriques méditerranéennes (les modèles des Cités-Etats) d’où une question centrale : s’agit-il d’une Méditerranée de villes et de métropoles qui se fait au détriment des Etats et leurs territorialités classiques ? Les systèmes de mobilité, opposés soit-ils, n’attestent-ils pas d’un grand mouvement qui se fait pour et par les villes ? Quel type de développement pour les nouveaux espaces des sociétés ? Quel statut des lieux et des territoires dans la logique sélective de la mondialisation ?

4- Construire la Méditerranée : comment et pourquoi?

Les géographes mettent l’accent de plus en plus sur les prophéties auto-réalisatrices et les utopies probables. L’Europe en est un exemple édifiant. La Méditerranée pourrait-elle être un autre exemple ? La question mérite réflexion et débat au moins au niveau de la confrontation de quelques scénarios probables qui se rapportent à l’évolution géopolitique, géo-économique et sociétale des sociétés méditerranéennes.

Appel à Communications

- Le Colloque est ouvert à tous les spécialistes s’intéressant à la dimension spatiale des sociétés.

- Chaque présentation doit comprendre l’axe choisi parmi les 4 proposés, le titre de la communication, le(s) nom(s) de(s) l’auteur(e)(s), avec institution(s) de rattachement et adresses (postale et numérique) et 5 mots-clés.

- Le fichier numérique doit être envoyé au format .doc à l’adresse suivante et cela avant le 31/5/2009 :

colloqgeographsousse@gmail.com -

Après évaluation les auteurs dont la proposition est retenue seront avisés, par courrier électronique, avant le 30/6/2009.

- Les textes, dans leur version finale, doivent parvenir avant le 30/10/2009.

- Un comité scientifique se chargera de l’évaluation en vue de la publication des actes du Colloque.

2/05/2009

Ninth International Conference on the Mediterranean Coastal Environment (MEDCOAST 09)
10-14 November 2009, in Sochi, Russia, and the deadline to submit your abstracts is 20th of April, 2009.
You can find out the Call for Abstracts at the following address:

http://www.medcoast.org.tr/MC09/Call_for_Papers_MEDCOAST%2009.pdf


Ms. Burcu Cetin | Program Officer

Mediterranean Coastal Foundation | (MEDCOAST Foundation) | Volkan Sokak, No 52 (Beyaz Ev), Akyaka 48650, Mugla, Turkey | Tel: +90 252 2435500 | Fax: + 90 252 2434495


MEDCOAST Secretariat, c/o Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara, Turkey | Tel: +90 312 210 54 29 | Fax: +90 312 210 79 87

29/04/2009

Somalia – Refugees and Diaspora
Somalia page at the United Nations Hing Commisioner for Refugees website:
http://www.unhcr.org/country/som.html
March 2009 report from the United Nations Development Program:

Link to pdf: http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fass/projects/medmobilities/docs/undp_report_onsomali_diaspora%5B1%5D.pdf


Media report on the role of Somali diaspora in pirate activity

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28158455/
Source: Migration Information Source – Migration Policy Institute
More information about Somalia :

http://www.elpais.com/articulo/internacional/unica/industria/funciona/elpepuint/20090412elpepuint_7/Tes

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/country_profiles/1072592.stm

http://www.msf.org/


17/04/2009

New Journal : Tourism Consumption
Edited by Hazel Andrews and Kevin Meethan
http://www.tourismconsumption.org/index.htm

The purpose of the Journal of Tourism Consumption and Practice is to publish original, peer reviewed articles, shorter discussion pieces, book reviews and conference reports which advance the field of tourism studies and which broadly address forms of tourism as modes of consumption and practice.

We live in a world characterised by a complex global interplay of information, economics, culture and space. People, goods and capital are more mobile than ever before. Such mobility and flux creates the conditions in which new forms of identity, work and leisure, as well as new socio – spatial configurations are emerging which may involve translocational, transnational and multi-cultural elements.
Tourism is an integral part of such processes that also involves the creation and maintenance of tourist spaces which are in part spaces of the imaginary, of fantasy and dreaming. It is within such spaces and flows that tourists, as temporary migrants, circulate. often travelling with a set of expectations derived from various media such as brochures, TV programmes, the internet and the popular genres of travel writing, as much as from their previous travel experiences. The spaces of tourism are constructed, more or less consciously, to fulfil - or attempt to fulfil - such expectations through representations and the consumption of goods and services, as well as the cultural assets and activities to be found at a destination, or en route. We view tourism then as a practical accomplishment which involves performative elements and the active engagement of the tourist/traveller through practice and embodiment in the creation of meanings, identities, and place.

The main focus of this journal then is to examine the interplay between the production and consumption of tourism as forms of interaction between people and place. While tourism is a phenomenon in its own right, its centrality in contemporary capitalist society along with other forms of mobilities allows it to operate as a lens through which broader social and cultural processes can be illuminated.

To that end the journal welcomes contributions that both reflect on the consumptive and performative nature of tourism per se but also which use tourism as a means to examine questions pertinent to social and cultural life more generally and further articulates the use of current areas of theoretical debate in critical analyses.

We are also keen to exploit the opportunities that new technology offers, authors are encouraged to use still photographs, video and sound clips where appropriate.


15/04/2009

New publication: Extending Hospitality: Giving Space, Taking Time
Edited by Mustafa Dikec, Nigel Clark and Clive Barnett

Edinburgh University Press (Paragraph special issues)

Contents:

Extending Hospitality: Giving Space, Taking Time | Mustafa Dikec, Nigel Clark, Clive Barnett

'Wanted': Organs, Passports and the Integrity of the Transient's Body | Mireille Rosello

Hospitality Lessons: Learning the Shared Language of Derrida and the Balga Bedouin | Andrew Shryock

The Limits of Hospitality | Heidrun Friese

Women's Bodies Between National Hospitality and Domestic Biopolitics | Rosalyn Diprose

Hospitable Harems? A European Woman and Oriental Spaces in the Enlightenment | Judith Still

Trading Hospitality: Kant, Cosmopolitics and Commercium | Diane Morgan


12/04/2008

New book: After the Car
Kingsley Dennis & John urry
A provocative exploration of a possible future without the car, from two leading sociologists.

* Examines the impact of global warming, global population increases and the peaking of oil supplies, among other things, on the future of how we travel.

* Argues that there will come a time in the future where, by necessity, the present car system will be're-designed' and're-engineered'.

* After The Car will interest sociologists, policy makers, industry, as well as the general reader. It will be of interest to every 'car user'.

It is difficult to imagine a world without the car, and yet that is exactly what Dennis and Urry set out to do in this provocative new book. They argue that the days of the car are numbered: powerful forces around the world are undermining the car system and will usher in a new transport system sometime in the next few decades. Specifically, the book examines how several major processes are shaping the future of how we travel, including:

* Global warming and its many global consequences

* Peaking of oil supplies

* Increased digitisation of many aspects of economic and social life

* Massive global population increases

The authors look at changes in technology, policy, economy and society, and make a convincing argument for a future where, by necessity, the present car system will be re-designed and re-engineered.


Yet the book also suggests that there are some hugely bleak dilemmas facing the twenty first century. The authors lay out what they consider to be possible 'post-car' future scenarios. These they describe as 'local sustainability', 'regional warlordism' and 'digital networks of control'.
Some have described the 20th Century as the century of the car. Now the century has come to a close - and things are about to change.
publication details

8 May ~ 212 pages

978-0-7456-4421-9 Hardback £45.00 / $59.95

978-0-7456-4422-6 Paperback £14.99 / $19.95

the author

Kingsley Dennis was formerly Research Associate in the Centre for Mobilities Research (CeMoRe) at Lancaster University. John Urry is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and CeMoRe Director at Lancaster University


for more information/ interviews /review copy requests

CONTACT: Amandine Decam, Polity Marketing

Tel: 01865 476146

Email: afdecam@wiley.com


10/04/2009

Blog on trans-Saharian migration

http://lacomunidad.elpais.com/inmigracion/posts


8/04/2009

Fiction book on African migration: Leaving Tangier
Leaving Tangier

Tahar Ben Jelloun

Apr 2nd 2009

From The Economist print edition

IN HIS latest work to be translated into English, Tahar Ben Jelloun, Morocco’s best-known novelist, examines how much people are willing to sacrifice to start a new life in Europe, and the consequences of taking flight. Mr Ben Jelloun is no stranger to these issues, having left Morocco himself in 1971 to study in Paris. He has won numerous literary prizes, including the Prix Goncourt in 1987, an award he now judges.

In “Leaving Tangier”, the author draws on his research as a social psychiatrist that also inspired an earlier novel, “Solitaire”, as a way of exploring psychological and sexual dysfunctions that arise as a result of migration. Azel, an educated, heterosexual young man from Tangier, is unable to find work and becomes obsessed with his desire to escape from Morocco. He spends every evening at the Café Haha, gazing longingly at the lights twinkling on the Spanish coastline just 20 miles (32km) away. When he meets Miguel Lopez, a rich Spanish homosexual, Azel seizes the opportunity and leaves his family and his country behind to become Miguel’s lover in Barcelona. However, he underestimates the extent to which this decision will destroy both his sexuality and his sense of self.

In 40 short chapters Mr Ben Jelloun weaves together a tapestry of exile and loss as he follows his characters through the dream and reality of leaving Tangier. Al Afia, “the fire”, smuggles boatloads of illegal emigrants across the strait, unashamedly profiting from an enterprise that often ends in arrest or drowning. Azel’s sister, Kenza, enters into a marriage of convenience with Miguel and obtains a job and a resident’s permit in Spain, but her dream of finding “love, true love” is snatched away. Back in Tangier, the most touching figure is Malika, an imaginative young girl who dies before any of her dreams can be realised.

The invisible, omnipresent character in the text is Morocco itself, as Mr Ben Jelloun demonstrates the difficulty of ever really “leaving” your country. Although most of the plot takes place in Spain, the characters’ thoughts continually turn back to Morocco, a country that remains the “dearest and greatest” of their anxieties. “Leaving Tangier” is a brave, unflinching look at the issues underlying economic migration from North Africa—and the hard choices people make between roots and wings.


7/4/2009


2nd Meeting of Young Researchers around the Mediterranean
The 2nd Meeting of Young Researchers around the Mediterranean will be held in Oran, Algeria on 2nd, 3rd and 4th June 2009.

The UNESCO Chair of Intercultural Dialogue in the Mediterranean of the University Rovira i Virgili will organize the event in cooperation with the University of Oran Es-Senia and the CRASC and with the collaboration of the AUF and it will be funded by the AECID.

The Meeting in its second edition aims to go on with the 1st Meeting of Young Researchers around the Mediterranean work, Tarragona 2007.

- To favour the projection of the young researchers in their surrounding and at Mediterranean level

- To promote the contact and the reflexion exchange between the participants.

- To set actions and projects to deeply improve the research in the different Euro-Mediterranean countries and also to be to the advantage of its university institutions or centres through the reinforcement of its internal and external function structures.

The Meeting will start with a one-day conference on governance in the Euromed universities.
Further information: http://www.medyre.org/index.html

5/7/2009


Call for papers for the RC21 sessions of the ISA world congress of sociology
Gothenburg, Sweden, July 11-17 2010
Cosmobilities session (8b).

If you are interested, your paper abstract including paper title, short description (within 200 words), and name, affiliation, country and email address as paper author(s) should be sent to session organizers as well as conference coordinators: Fernando Diaz Orueta

Fernando.diaz@ua.es and Kuniko Fujita fujitak@msu.edu by October

31, 2009. This call for papers is listed at ISA web site


http://www.isa-sociology.org/congress2010/rc/rc21.htm
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