Academic program and student outcomes assessment plan



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Appendix 6



Demographic Data on Student Profile
The table below presents data from the Applied Population Lab (APL), University of Wisconsin-Madison prepared in March of 2005 and shows the projected high school graduate pool for the top six feeder counties for UW Oshkosh over the next five years. Approximately 80% of UW Oshkosh freshman come from these six counties. These data indicate an increasing population of high school graduates initially with a dramatic decline projected in the years from 2009 to 2010.


Actual and Projected High School Graduates 2002-2010 – UW Oshkosh Top Feeder Counties

County

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Brown

2,792

3,159

2,996

3,047

3,075

3,096

3,164

3,252

3,035

Fond du Lac

1,307

1,309

1,280

1,179

1,245

1,183

1,222

1,229

1,207

Milwaukee

8,943

8,745

8,790

8,795

8,643

8,842

8,983

8,983

8,603

Outagamie

2,490

2,592

2,598

2,604

2,664

2,653

2,587

2,587

2,648

Waukesha

4,880

4,986

4,983

4,932

5,003

4,988

5,121

5,121

4,790

Winnebago

1,681

1,728

1,737

1,673

1,654

1,674

1,698

1,698

1,681

Total

22,093

22,519

22,384

22,230

22,284

22,436

22,775

22,775

21,964

By contrast, the demographic data in the table below indicate a projected increase in the number of minority public high school graduates over this same time period.




Actual and Projected Public High School Graduates 1999-2010




1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Asian

1355

1543

1602

1816

1922

2050

1990

2116

2253

2249

2367

2175

Black

2437

2344

2286

2605

2578

2624

2731

2714

2877

2969

2918

2895

Hispanic

1379

1355

1444

1556

1594

1631

1732

1885

1974

2140

2256

2471

Indian

541

501

534

573

584

597

586

602

607

640

623

635

White

52468

51929

52294

52752

53929

53156

51992

50710

50841

50757

50070

48529

Female

29434

29299

29314

30203

30737

30494

30042

29656

29951

30407

29842

29184

Male

28757

28357

28771

29418

30042

29832

29474

28960

29375

29306

29303

28577

Total

58127

57626

58069

59596

60757

60306

59500

58593

59309

59674

59129

57743

The percentage of new enrolled students at UW Oshkosh who rank in the top 10%, top 25%, and top 50% has generally increased over the last four years.



High School Rank of New Enrolled Students

Year

Top 10%

Top 25%

Top 50%

2001

9.2%

31.5%

78.5%

2002

7.4%

31.3%

81.4%

2003

10.3%

39.7%

91.8%

2004

10.7%

39.3%

91.8%

ACT Scores have also increased as have the number of National Merit Recipients and Academic Excellence students.




Additional Information on New First-Year Students


Year

Average ACT

Nat’l Merit Recipients

Academic Excellence

2001

21.8

1

16

2002

21.6

0

21

2003

22.2

4

23

2004

22.5

4

26

Appendix 7



Student Learning Environment
Programs, facilities, and technical support already in place provide a positive learning environment but more needs to be done if the campus is to remain competitive in attracting and retaining high quality students. The University mission places emphasis on student engagement and yet it has been a challenge to define and communicate the meaning of community engagement to both faculty and students. More university-wide programs such as Odyssey, TBIS, and PBIS are needed to create greater integration and assimilation of students into the campus community and culture. The campus is not currently viewed as a “Campus of Choice” and it remains a challenge to develop buildings, grounds, and programs that achieve this desired outcome.

Student Learning Environment
Several colleges and universities have successfully designed “academic communities” within residence hall facilities/programs. UW Oshkosh has had some success with academic communities, including the Freshmen Learning Community (later, the University Learning Community) and the Renaissance Living Programs. The Futures Report for Residence Life (2005) provides for five academic community possibilities:


    1. Continue the Mix which includes utilizing our facilities primarily for freshmen and sophomore students, and smaller numbers of juniors, seniors and graduate students housed in traditional double and singles. Traditional programs designed for new students will be the emphasis.

    2. Create an Honors Learning Community in which Fletcher Hall will host the University Honors Program and faculty. This new community would combine aspects of the current University Honors Program at UW Oshkosh and the Department of Residence Life’s history of strong student leadership development and activities, with new initiatives to increase the academic involvement among the residents.

    3. First Year Focus (FYE) programming would be enhanced if the sophomore requirement was rescinded by the Board of Regents. The goal would be to integrate a “first year experience” with the academic colleges and the Department of Residence Life. Plans to implement a FYE housing option for Fall 2007 are underway. Nelson, Breese, and Clemans halls have been designated as the future FYE halls.

    4. Continue the Mix with a ‘Freshmen Focus’ and an ‘Intentional Sophomore Engagement’ would bring a new emphasis on programming for new and returning students within the residence halls. We spend a great deal of time, energy and money on programs and experiences to assist our new students in their transitions to university life in-and-outside of the classrooms. Helping our new students get a good start in their academics and campus lives has traditionally been our focus as shown in the Community Rights and Responsibilities Handbook to our Community Living Model (programming and educational activities model). Upper-class students are included wherever they have an interest. Many take leadership roles as hall leaders, informal role models and Community Advisors. An Intentional Sophomore Engagement program might stimulate various campus departments, programs and services to pay greater attention to the needs of this group.

    5. Living/Learning and Specialty Housing provides for the alternative placement/assignment in a residence hall, directly related to the academic interests and choices of the individual student. A move in this direction would require a high level of cooperation between Residence Life and the faculty and staff in the individual colleges. Success in such an effort would mean a much stronger academic emphasis in our approach to residential living, making it easier for us to provide strong, tangible support to the academic mission of the university. Facility planning could entail the creation of space more oriented to academic work (i.e., studios, rehearsal space and technologically current study areas).

Such an effort would be most successful if allowed to grow naturally over time, like the Renaissance Program. This would give us a better chance of ensuring that all pieces of the puzzle—academic financial, and facilities—were in place as we moved forward. Decisions on renovations and financing would be made in this context.


Since the Futures Report for Residence Life, planning for a 400 resident suite-style residence hall has begun. A feasibility study with a variety of focus groups will be conducted the Fall 2006. The study will determine such project aspects as: footprint, size, amenities, programming, suite configurations and pricing.
In addition, it will be important to expand existing support services for adult nontraditional and commuter students. Evening hours of University services, user-friendly online support, on-campus gathering and study spaces, as well as increased flexibility in course scheduling will be essential to serve the growing adult nontraditional segment of the student body.
Student Outcomes Assessment
Ongoing assessment is an integral component of shaping our student learning environment. The campus participates in several external surveys to assess student outcomes. For example, we have participated in both NSSE and FSSE. Officials from NSSE visited our campus last spring to help us further examine previous results. Pending the results of the 2006 administration, NSSE officials will be asked to return to review the outcomes and suggest means to further engage students in their academic experience and environment.
In order to supplement these campus-wide assessments, individual units engage in outcomes assessment tailored to specific programs and services. For example, to assess the effects of differential tuition programs, the university has implemented the College Perception Survey, Career Counseling Outcomes Assessment, General Counseling Center Client Satisfaction Assessment, and Counseling Outcomes Assessment. The Counseling Center coordinates the collection and analysis of the College Student Inventory to assess student strengths, needs, attitudes, coping mechanisms and receptivity to assistance. The Counseling Center is currently working to administer Noel Levitz Retention Management System and coordinate retention enhancing services.
The Campus Violence Prevention Program implemented an outcome tracking system that allows the university to assess the numbers and types of students served, outcomes of cases referred to campus adjudication and local law enforcement, numbers of training and prevention education services provided on campus, and numbers and types of prevention education materials distributed.
Leadership development, citizenship and volunteerism are integral components of our residential education program. For twenty years the university has used Square One, an assessment instrument to determine the successes of our residence hall governments. This tool is used by hall leaders, professional staff and our Leadership Development Specialists.
Residence Life and Reeve Union survey students each year, using the Educational Benchmark Inventory to determine the students’ satisfaction with staffing, programming, facilities and services. The survey results are compared with six comparable universities and with national data.
The Student Health Center administers the American College Health Association Survey every two years to gather data about student health and mental health. It assesses behaviors and their relationship to satisfaction with the collegiate experience and academic performance. It also provides information used to improve programs and services that meet student health and mental health needs.
UW Oshkosh participates with other comprehensive System institutions in the administration of the UW System Alcohol and Other Drug survey. Student use of alcohol and other drugs is surveyed, as well as, the consequences and behaviors related to alcohol and other drug use and misuse. The information is used to assess information about campus AODA interventions and educational programs.


1 % of Undergrad Courses Taught by. . . Fall 1994 estimates are posted from “Introduction, 1995-96”, a publication produced annually by UW HELP. Fall 2005 data is taken from the UW HELP’s ’06-’07 version of “Introduction”.



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