An Roinn Cosanta Óglaigh na hÉireann Department of Defence Defence Forces


Appendix 1 Naval Service Organisation



Download 496.54 Kb.
Page19/19
Date19.10.2016
Size496.54 Kb.
#3672
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19

Appendix 1 Naval Service Organisation










Units engaged in ship maintenance activity











APPENDIX 2 NAVAL SERVICE FLOTILLA





LE Emer P21

 

 




 

LE Emer was built in Ireland to the basic design of the Naval Service’s first purpose built Offshore Patrol Vessel, the LE Deirdre but was modified to improve stability and speed.
LE Emer's original Bofors 40L60 gun was recently upgraded to a Bofors 40L70 improving the range and accuracy of her main armament.
Operationally, LE Emer chalked up a notable first when she undertook the first ever deployment of an Irish naval ship to resupply Irish troops serving with the United Nations troops in Lebanon in 1979. This was the first of many such deployments and the Naval Service now frequently supports Irish troops abroad. A notable operation in her history was her part in the apprehension of the Marita Anne in 1984, which stopped after warning shots were fired by Emer and which was found to be carrying a significant quantity of arms and ammunition.






 






 




Type

Offshore Patrol Vessel

Displacement, tonnes

1019.5 Standard

Length Overall

65.2m

Beam

10.5m

Draught

4.4m

Main Machinery

2 x SEMT-Pielstick Diesels;4800hp, 1 Shaft

Speed, Knots

17kts

Range, miles

4000 at 17kts, 6750 at 12kts

Complement

46 (5 Officers)

Weapons

1 x Bofors 40mm L70 Cannon,
2 x Gambo 20mm

Commissioned

16 January 1978









LE Aoife P22

 

LE Aoife was built in Ireland to the Naval Service’s Deirdre design but was modified for stability and speed and was also fitted with a bow thruster to improve manoeuvrability. LE Aoife's original Bofors 40L60 gun was recently upgraded to a Bofors 40L70 improving the range and accuracy of her main armament. Among many notable operational successes in her history, LE Aoife played a major role in the location of the flight recorder of the Air India plane which crashed off the Irish coast after a bombing in 1985.




Type

Offshore Patrol Vessel

Displacement, tonnes

1019.5 Standard

Length Overall

65.2m

Beam

10.5m

Draught

4.4m

Main Machinery

2 x SEMT-Pielstick Diesels;4800hp, 1 Shaft

Speed, Knots

17kts

Range, miles

4000 at 17kts; 6750 at 12kts

Complement

46 (5 Officers)

Weapons

1 x Bofors 40mm L70 Cannon,
2 x Gambo 20mm

Commissioned

29 November 1979










LE Aisling P23

 

LE Aisling was built in Ireland to the Naval Service’s Deirdre design but was modified for stability and speed and was also fitted with a bow thruster to improve manoeuvrability. LE Aisling's original Bofors 40L60 gun was recently upgraded to a Bofors 40L70 improving the range and accuracy of her main armament.

A notable operation in her history was her part, in conjunction with the LE Emer, in the apprehension of the Marita Anne in 1984, which stopped after warning shots were fired and which was found to be carrying a significant quantity of arms and ammunition.

Another notable, though sad, duty conducted by Aisling was her part in the recovery mission following the Air India bombing in 1985 off the Irish coast. LE Aisling coordinated the search and recovered 38 bodies before handing the continuing search over to her sister ships which had by then arrived on-scene.




Type

Offshore Patrol Vessel

Displacement, tonnes

1019.5 Standard

Length Overall

65.2m

Beam

10.5m

Draught

4.4m

Main Machinery

2 x SEMT-Pielstick Diesels;4800hp;1 Shaft

Speed, Knots

17kts

Range, miles

4000 at 17kts; 6750 at 12kts

Complement

46 (5 Officers)

Weapons

1 x Bofors 40mm L70 Cannon;
2 x Gambo 20mm

Commissioned

21 May 1980








LE Eithne – P31

 

LE Eithne was built in Ireland as a Helicopter Patrol Vessel. The equipment fit was to a very high standard and included the Naval Services first Ops Room, which integrated control of armament and aircraft to a designated centre, remote from the bridge. Her main armament is a Bofors 57mm anti-aircraft gun with a LIOD fire control system. Secondary armament is provided by two 20mm Rheinmetals. Eithne is also equipped with the DAO5 Air Surveillance Radar.

In the summer of 1986 Eithne scored a notable first, by becoming the first Irish Naval Service ship to cross the Atlantic, when she sailed to the United States, visiting Hamilton, New York and Boston.









Type

Helicopter Patrol Vessel

Displacement, tonnes

1760 Standard, 1910 Full Load

Length Overall

80.8m

Beam

12m

Draught

4.3m

Main Machinery

2 x Ruston 12RKC diesels, 6800 hp, 2 Shafts

Speed, Knots

20+, 19 normal

Range, miles

7000 at 15kts

Complement

85 (9 Officers)

Weapons

1 x Bofors 57mm Cannon
2 x Rheimetall 20mm Cannon

Helicopters

1 SA365f Dauphin

Commissioned

7 December 1984









LE Orla P41

 

LE Orla was formerly the HMS Swift, patrolling the waters of Hong Kong. She was purchased by the State in 1988. The primary armament is a 76mm OTO Melara compact gun and Radamec electro optical fire control system. LE Orla is a high-speed vessel, designed to move rapidly about the patrol area and to bring her considerable firepower to bear where necessary.

LE Orla scored a notable operational success in 1993 when she conducted the biggest drug seizure in the history of the State at that time, with her interception and boarding at sea of the 65 ft ketch, Brime.





 

Type

Coastal Patrol Vessel

Displacement, tonnes

712 Full Load

Length Overall

62.6m

Beam

10m

Draught

2.7m

Main Machinery

2 x Crossley SEMT-Pielstick Diesels, 14400hp, 2 Shafts

Speed, Knots

25kts+

Range, miles

2500 at 17kts

Complement

39 (6 Officers)

Weapons

1 X 76mm OTO Melara Cannon;,
2 x 12.7mm HMG,
4 x 7.62mm GPMG

Commissioned

1988







LE Ciara P42




LE Ciara was formerly the HMS Swallow, patrolling the waters of Hong Kong. She was purchased by the State in 1988. The primary armament is a 76mm OTO Melara compact gun and Radamec electro optical fire control system. LE Ciara is a high-speed vessel, designed to move rapidly about the patrol area and to bring her considerable firepower to bear where necessary. LE Ciara scored a notable operational success in Nov 1999 when she conducted the second biggest drug seizure in the history of the State at that time, with her interception and boarding at sea of the MV Posidonia off the SW coast of Ireland.




Type

Coastal Patrol Vessel

Displacement, tonnes

712 Full Load

Dimensions, feet (metres)

204.1 x 32.8 x 8.9(62.6 x 10 x 2.7)

Main Machinery

2 x Crossley SEMT-Pielstick Diesels, 14400hp, 2 Shaft

Speed, Knots

25kts+

Range, miles

2500 at 17kts

Complement

39 (6 Officers)

Weapons

1 X 76mm OTO Melara Cannon,
2 x 12.7mm HMG,
4 x 7.62mm GPMG

Commissioned

1988







LE Roisin P51

 

LE Roisin was built in Appledore Shipyards in the UK for the Naval Service and Naval Service engineers stood by her construction at all stages. She was built to a design that optimises her patrol performance in Irish waters, which are among the roughest in the world, year round. For that reason a greater length overall (78.8m) was chosen, giving her a long, sleek appearance and allowing the opportunity to improve the conditions onboard for her crew. Facilities onboard include more private accommodation, a gymnasium and changing/ storage areas for boarding teams.

LE Roisin's main armament is a 76mm OTO Melara compact gun and Radamec fire control system, which is tied in to the integrated bridge system. She also has a highly automated engine room. Her twin Wartsila diesels give her efficient patrolling ability with good speed performance when required.






Type

Offshore Patrol Vessel

Displacement, tonnes

1500

Length Overall

78.84 metres

Beam

14.00 Metres

Draught

3.80 Metres

Main Machinery

2 x Twin 16 cyl V26 Wartsila 26 Medium Speed Diesels giving 5000KW at 1000RPM, 2 Shafts

Speed, Knots

23

Range, miles

6000nm at 15kts

Complement

44 (6 Officers)

Weapons

1 X 76mm OTO Melara Cannon,
2 x 12.7mm HMG,
4 x 7.62mm GPMG

Commissioned

15 December 1999






LE Niamh P52

 

LE Niamh was built in Appledore Shipyards in the UK for the Naval Service. She is an improved version of her sister ship, LE Roisin and Naval Service Naval Service engineers stood by her construction at all stages.

She is built to the successful Roisin design that optimises her patrol performance in Irish waters, which are among the roughest in the world, year round. For that reason a greater length overall (78.8m) was chosen, giving her a long, sleek appearance.

Her main armament is a 76mm OTO Melara compact gun and Radamec fire control system, which is tied in to the integrated bridge system. She also has a highly automated engine room. Her twin Wartsila diesels give her efficient patrolling ability with good speed performance when required.

One of LE Niamh's most notable episodes was her trip to Asia in 2002, which was the first ever visit by an Irish Naval Service Vessel to that part of the world and included official visits to China, Japan, Korea and Malaysia, together with a refuelling stop in India and a UN resupply visit to Irish troops based in Eritrea. She also recently supported the first ever deployment of Irish troops to Liberia, in West Africa and provided transport and logistical support to the contingent that conducted reconnaissance of the port and territory prior to the arrival of the main body.









Type

Offshore Patrol Vessel

Displacement, tonnes

1500

Length Overall

78.84 metres

Beam

14.00 Metres

Draught

3.80 Metres

Main Machinery

2 x Twin 16 cyl V26 Wartsila 26 Medium Speed Diesels giving 5000KW at 1000RPM, 2 Shafts

Speed, Knots

23

Range, miles

6000nm at 15kts

Complement

44 (6 Officers)

Weapons

1 X 76mm OTO Melara Cannon,
2 x 12.7mm HMG,
4 x 7.62mm GPMG

Commissioned

18 September 2001




APPENDIX 3 Programme Logic Model


The Programme Logic Model maps out the shape and logical linkages of a programme. It provides a systematic and visual way to present and share understanding of the cause-effect relationships between inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes (results and impacts). The Programme Logic Model is used in planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of programmes. Adoption of this approach should enable programmes to be analysed in terms of inputs, activities or processes, outputs, and outcomes that are arranged to achieve specific strategic objectives. The Programme Logic Model is also sometimes referred to as the “Input-Output Model”.
Programme Logic Model22


Basic definitions of the elements of the programme logic model are summarised below.

Strategic Objectives - Describe the desired outcome at the end of the strategy period. The objectives should ideally be described in both qualitative and quantitative terms.
Inputs - There are many inputs to programmes – physical inputs like buildings and equipment, data inputs like information flows, human inputs (grades of staff) and systems inputs like procedures. The financial input is the budget made available to the programme. Inputs are sometimes referred to as resources.
Activities - Activities, also called processes, are the actions that transform inputs into outputs. Activities are collections of tasks and work-steps performed to produce the outputs of a programme.
Outputs - The outputs are what are produced by a programme. They may be goods or services.
Outcomes – These are the wider effects of the programme, from a sectoral or national perspective, in the medium to long term. They include the medium to long term effects on the targeted beneficiaries.

1 Relates to the standard of vessel maintenance the Naval Service set which is informed by the standards set down by International Convention for the Safety Of Life At Sea (SOLAS) and prevention of Marine Pollution (MARPOL) that are appropriate to the Naval Service.

2 The terminology used in this report is as follows: the term “defence” is used to refer in a broad sense to defence provision in Ireland comprising civil and military elements; “Defence Organisation” refers to the civil and military organisation; the “Defence Forces” refers to the military organisation.


3 Department of Defence and Defence Forces Strategy Statement 2008 - 2010

4 Mr. Robert Mooney replaced Mr. Jim Blighe

5 Colonel Paul Pakenham replaced Colonel Bob Fitzgerald.

6 Ms. Eilís O’Connell replaced Mr. Brendan Coghlan

7 Mr. Frank Griffin replaced Ms. Eileen Dalton (Department of Finance).

8 Ms. Patricia Troy replaced Mr. Robert Mooney

9 White Paper on Defence (2000) para 4.11.1

10 White Paper on Defence (2000) para 4.11.8

11 White Paper on Defence (2000) para 4.11.5

12 White Paper on Defence (2000) para 4.11.10

13 Department of Defence and Defence Forces Strategy Statement 2008 - 2010

14 Account Analysis Report MIF

15 The 2006 cost of contracted maintenance includes two new projects; major overhaul of 76mm OTO Melara main armament and an upgrade of LIOD weapons systems. Difficulties were also experienced in 2006 with the changeover from IMS to MIF where some inventory items were wrongly procured under the Contracted Maintenance DoD Code. It was not possible to identify all of these costs hence the 2006 figure is higher than the previous years.

16 Utility costs per m² sourced from Forfas


17 Utility costs attributable to MMU and Tech Stores were apportioned based on the proportion of time staff spent on maintenance related activity (84% and 57 % respectively)


18


19 The 1680 patrol day target was not achieved due to nine days unscheduled maintenance for LE Ciara and an additional thirteen days planned maintenance for LE Orla.

20 The personnel here (including the NESU) are solely engaged in engineering duties on the USCG cutters. However, similar to personnel in the Naval Service FSG, in addition to their primary function of maintenance, USCG personnel are also required to conduct other tasks such as regimental, ceremonial and security duties.

21 Readiness is the immediate (within 8 hrs) ability of a given Naval Service vessel to execute a designated mission

22 Source – Department of Finance Guidance Manual for Value for Money and Policy Reviews

PRN No. A9/0498

Download 496.54 Kb.

Share with your friends:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2022
send message

    Main page