Canadian History in the Twentieth Century


Assessment/Evaluation Techniques



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Assessment/Evaluation Techniques


  • Formal assessment of research skills to be done as students research their topics and after the students have handed in their research questions and sources (knowledge/understanding; thinking/inquiry)

  • Evaluation of inquiry questions and resources used (thinking/inquiry)

  • Formal evaluation of each student’s report (knowledge/understanding; thinking/inquiry) – see Appendix 2.6.3 for report evaluation rubric

  • Evaluation of performance (communication; application)

  • Self-evaluation of the research and performance

  • Evaluation of set, props, and costumes used, for appropriateness (knowledge/understanding; application; communication)

Accommodations


  • Some students may require additional time to write the report.

  • Some students may need the use of a word processor and dictionary to complete their reports.

  • Students having difficulty with developing and answering inquiry questions should be given additional assistance by the teacher.

  • Students who have difficulty obtaining props or an appropriate costume may need specific suggestions appropriate to their roles.

  • Students may require more time to complete the test or may need to take part or all of it orally.

  • Opportunities should be offered to those identified students to redo the report or re-take the test if necessary after teacher feedback.

  • If a student is unable to take part in an on-camera role, s/he might be given the job of assisting other students with research, learning scripts, and set-up.

  • Individual exceptional students’ IEPs should be examined so that the activity can be altered to suit their individual needs.

  • Where expectations are to be modified (according to IEP), assessment should be fitted to suit.

Resources


As this is a culminating activity, any of the sources listed at the beginning of the unit may be used here. As it is a research exercise and there are so many sources available through the Library/Resource Centre, students will certainly find others in doing their research. Consult list made in advance with the librarian.

Appendices


Appendices 2.6.1, 2.6.2, and 2.6.3

See web site for additional appendices: student question and resource organizer (2.6.4); student log (2.6.5); report questions (2.6.6); student self-evaluation (2.6.7).


Appendix 2.6.1

Topic List and Description for Newsmagazine Television Show





Depression Era Topics

World War II Era Topics

Names

Role/Topic

Names

Role/Topic

1.

Host

- The role of the two hosts together is to talk to each of the groups, find out their topics, decide the order in which the vignettes should occur, decide on introductions and the concluding remarks for the entire show

- They should come up with a name for the show and create a banner for the show’s name.


1.

Host

- same as other host description



1.
2.

Impact of the Depression Across Canada

- Students may wish to do this as news anchors or reporters on the road, and report how the Depression is affecting people across Canada.

- The Prairies, having suffered the most during the Depression, should be the focus of the report.


1.
2.

The Axis Alliance

- Students may wish to act as war correspondents, reporting on how the Axis came about.

- They may want to use a map outlining how much of the world was involved in the war as a result of the Axis ambitions, taking their report to the height of Axis powers.


1.
2.

Relief Camps

- Students may wish to approach this topic as a news story where the reporter interviews a man in a relief camp.



1.
2.

Government Propaganda and the Allied Cause

- Students may wish to create their own posters (based on their research) as a backdrop for a commercial spot in which government spokespersons encourage Canadians to become involved in the war.

- The appeal should go out to men, women, children, and businesses.

- OR the students may set up an interview where a government spokesperson is asked to defend what the government is doing about the war, the Conscription issue, etc.



1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Changing Politics and New Political Parties

- Students may wish to present themselves as political analysts, discussing the platforms of each of the four parties (Conservative, Liberal, Social Credit, CCF, and Union National), examining the way in which government was changing as a result of the economic pressures of the Depression.

- OR, if five students wanted to work on this topic, each one could be a leader of a political party (Bennett, King, Aberhart, Woodsworth, and Duplessis) and have a political discussion about what each party proposed as a way to solve the Depression.


1.
2.

The Holocaust

- Students could assume the role of soldiers present at the liberation of one of the camps and be interviewed about what they saw there.

- OR one of the students might play the role of a Holocaust survivor or someone who was in one of the Death/Concentration camps (based on true personal stories) being interviewed by a reporter.


1.
2.

Social/Cultural Impact

- This topic might be approached by having students do a series of commercials which would “air” periodically throughout the show, advertising products of the period, (perhaps using the Dionne Quints), selling records, promoting movies, etc. (demonstrating American influence on culture).

- OR students may wish to do an entertainment section on the show, reporting on the various radio shows, the matters of interest in entertainment (escapism), the founding of the CBC, and generally the way Canadians entertained themselves (they may wish to include sports here too), etc.


1.
2.

Technology and War

- Students might assume the roles of special correspondents, examining how technology changed the way in which war was fought, for example, the use of radar, cipher machines, new aircraft, V1/V2 rockets, modern tanks and nuclear weapons.

- They might consider preparing drawings to be used as part of their “set” for filming.

- They should focus on some examples to demonstrate the effect and implications of developing technology.



1.
2.

Other topic(s) of Interest

1.
2.

Japanese Internment

- The interview process would work well here where one student (the interviewer) prepares the audience with some background explanation and then interviews a Japanese-Canadian whose possessions were confiscated and whose family was sent to an internment camp during the war.



- OR the two students may wish to be investigative reporters, revealing their findings about the government’s intentions and actions to the public.




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