Human Anatomy Lecture: 13 Hatem a hatem bones of the neck: the cervical spineHuman Anatomy Lecture: 13 Hatem a hatem bones of the neck: the cervical spine
The cervical spine is the most superior portion of the vertebral column, lying between the cranium and the thoracic vertebrae
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Notes on Assessing Stability in the Traumatized Spine: Roles for mriNotes on Assessing Stability in the Traumatized Spine: Roles for mri
Gcs; that is, the protective recognition of individuals whose vertebral columns have not or will not protect their contents. We will call this loss of protective capability, “clinical instability.”
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Have observed assimilation of atlas in 2 Indian skullsHave observed assimilation of atlas in 2 Indian skulls
Total or partial assimilation of the atlas may be noted with the latter being the most common. [2] Ranade et al. (2007) [3] have examined 98 Indian human skulls for assimilation of atlas and noted two cases showing various degree of assimilation
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Bones of the skull: Bones of the neurocraniumBones of the skull: Bones of the neurocranium
Squamous suture: between squamous part of the temporal bone and the parietal bone on both sides
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Cervical-Occipital Assembly: Alar LigamentCervical-Occipital Assembly: Alar Ligament
Why does sideflexion increase ipsilateral vertebral artery occlusion with contralateral atlanto-axial rotation?
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Cervical-Occipital Assembly Movements of the Upper Cervical AssemblyCervical-Occipital Assembly Movements of the Upper Cervical Assembly
While there is movement of both ends of the linkage as a part of any ordinary movement, the head and body move synergistically, but largely independently. In order to achieve this relative isolation
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