Curriculum document state board of education howard n. Lee, C



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Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.


Objective 5.01: Evaluate the influence of immigration and rapid industrialization on urban life.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Urban Issues

  • Housing

  • Sanitation

  • Transportation

The rise of ethnic neighborhoods


New forms of leisure


Elevator

Electric trolleys

Jacob Riis

Ellis Island


Culture shock

Settlement houses

Jane Addams

Dumbbell tenements

Chinese Exclusion Act

Telephone

Alexander Graham Bell

Thomas Edison

Typewriter

Sweatshops

Amusement parks

Spectator sports




5.01a Review primary documents and photographs of the period, and write letters to friends and family in your “home” country describing a new life in America.

5.01b Debate whether the “melting pot” theory is an accurate phrase for America 1877-1900.

5.01c Graph patterns and sources of immigration to America over an extended period of time. Match with today’s patterns.


Audio and Visual Resources:

“New York “ PBS Series



Suggest Web Sites:

http://www.incwell.com/biographies/Edison.html

Immigration:

http://www.ncco.org

Statue of Liberty:

http://www.nps.gov.stli/prod02/htm

Emma Lazarus

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~CAP/LIBERTY/lazarus.html

http://www.tenement.org/encyclopedia.pdf

http://www.bergen.org/AAST/Projects/Immigration




Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Objective 5.01: (continued) Evaluate the influence of immigration and rapid industrialization on urban life.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities




Frederick Olmstead

Cultural pluralism

Urbanization

Nativism


Melting pot

5.01d Review diagrams of dumbbell tenements. How could they have been made safer?
5.01e Design pamphlets replicating earlier ones distributed to new arrivals in America.
5.01f Hold a mock city council meeting to propose solutions to urban issues of the day.



Suggested Literature Connections:

Raz Rozenzweig: Eight Hours for What We Will

Jacob Riis: How The Other Half Lives,

Emma Lazarus: “The Colossus”, 1833

Horatio Alger, Jr: Rags to Riches Series




Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Objective 5.01: (continued) Evaluate the influence of immigration and rapid industrialization on urban life.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







5.01g Compare positive and negative aspects of maintaining the existence of ethnic neighborhoods.
5.01h Analyze the quote by the Carpenter’s Union in Worchester, Mass.: “8 hours for work, 8 hours for rest, 8 hours for what we will.” How did this idea impact urban life?


Fine Arts Connections:

Cecilia Beaux: “ Man with the Cat” 1898, NMAA

Thomas Hart Benton: “Man with the Machine” NMAA

John Furguson Weir: “The Gun Foundry” 1866, NMAA

Fan Quilt” by Residents of Bourbon County, Kentucky, 1893, NMAA



Theodore Roszak: “Recording Sound”,

NMAA

Everett Shinn: “Eviction”, 1904, NMAA





Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Objective 5.02: Explain how business and industrial leaders accumulated wealth and wielded political and economic power.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Emergence of new industries:

Railroads

Steel

Oil
Changes in the ways businesses formed and consolidated power


Influence of business leaders as “captains of industry” or as “robber barons”



Bessemer Process

Andrew Carnegie

John Rockefeller

J. P. Morgan

Vanderbilt family

Edwin Drake

Standard Oil Company

U. S. Steel

George Westinghouse

Gospel of Wealth

Horatio Alger

Social Darwinism

Trust

Monopoly


Gilded Age


5.02a Research the business practices of men such as Carnegie and Rockefeller. Put them on trial as either “Captains of Industry”/”robber barons.”
5.02b Read excerpts of the “Gospel of Wealth” and discuss to what extent Carnegie and others practiced the philosophy.


Excerpts from “The Gospel of Wealth”

Bartlett’s Quotations (or another Source for quotations for this period)

“The Bosses of the Senate” political cartoon

“What a Funny Little Government” 1900 political cartoons

Biographical information on business and industrial leaders. A&E Biographies

Audio &Visual Resources:

“History of Standard Oil” PBS video


The Richest Man in the World” PBS The American Experience Series

American 1900”, PBS The American Experience Series



The Rockefellers” PBS




Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Objective 5.02: (continued) Explain how business and industrial leaders accumulated wealth and wielded political and economic power.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Relationship of big business to the government
Influence of Darwinism, Social Darwinism and the Gospel of Wealth





5.02c Interpret quotations from business leaders of the time and discuss how they reflect the idea of Social Darwinism.
5.02d Design a display for a Gilded Age Museum that features one of the emerging industries and its impact on people’s lives.
5.02e Discuss what responsibilities today’s corporate leaders have that the captains of industry did not.

Suggested Websites:

http://65.107.211.206/philosophy/socdar.html

http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h843.html

http://americanhistory.about.com/cs/gildedage

http://andrewcarnegie.tripod.com/acbio.html

Literature Connections:

Sinclair Lewis: Land

Kurt Vonnegut: Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow

Frank Norris: The Octopus

Ida Tarbell: The History of the Standard Oil Company 1903





Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Objective 5.02: (continued) Explain how business and industrial leaders accumulated wealth and wielded political and economic power.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







5.02f Research a business or industrial leader and prepare a resume for that individual.
5.02g Illustrate the concepts of vertical and horizontal integration in business.



Fine Arts Connections:

Edward Bruce: “Industry” 1902, NMAA

Childe Hassam: “Lillie” 1898, NMAA

Max Weber: “Foundary in Baltimore” 1915

NMAA


Thomas Dewing: “The Necklace”, “Dawn”, “Lady in White” 1907, NMAA




Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Objective 5.03: Assess the impact of labor unions on industry and the lives of workers.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Formation of labor unions
Types of unions
Tactics used by labor unions
Opposition to labor unions


Working conditions

Wages


Child labor

Craft unions

Trade unions

Knights of Labor

Haymarket Riot

American Federation of Labor

Samuel Gompers

Eugene Debs

Strike

Negotiation



Mediation


5.03a Create a chart to show the various unions that formed in the time period. Include these topics: how organized, goals, attempts to reach goals, and success.

5.03b Work cooperatively to form a union. Each group should develop rules for membership, goals, plans to reach goals, and expected results. Share with the class.

5.03c Diagram decision trees exploring the likely consequences and results of going on strike vs. collective bargaining or arbitration.


“Child Labor” Jackdaw Publication

“Shame of the Nation” photo collection



Audio & Visual Resources:

The film: “Mechanic”



Suggested Websites:

http://www.goondocksnet.com

http://www.socialstudieshelp.com

http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/childlabor

http://www.rannfile-ue.org/uen_1877.html

http://www.ncneilmusic.com/wrkunion.html

Literature Connections:

Upton Sinclair: The Jungle, 1906

John Spargo: The Bitter Cry of the Children, 1906




Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Objective 5.03: (continued) Assess the impact of labor unions on industry and the lives of workers.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities




Collective bargaining

Arbitration

Yellow-dog contract

Closed shop

Sherman Antitrust Act

The Great Strike (1877)

Pullman Strike

Homestead Strike




5.03d Write letters to the editor of a newspaper supporting or protesting attempts to organize a hypothetical union in the town.

5.03e Group students to review how presidents respond to different strikes in the time period and offer suggestions as to how the situation might have been resolved differently. Students should provide rationales.



Fine Arts Connections:

Song:


“Working and Union Song” by Keith and Rusty McNeil, WEM Records

“Lady Off the Shore” by Michael Rychlel

Louis Lozowick: “Butte” 1926, Hirshhorn Museum

Elsie Driggs: “Queensborough Bridge” 1927

Montclair Art Museum, N.J.





Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Objective 5.04: Describe the changing role of government in economic and political affairs.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Impact of law and court decisions
“Laissez-Faire” government policies
Operation of political machines
Patronage vs. the civil service system
Impact of corruption and scandal in the government
The Election of 1896 (see also Goal 4.03)


Sherman Anti-Trust Act

Pendleton Act

Political machines

Boss Tweed

Tammany Hall

Thomas Nast

Credit Mobilier scandal

Graft


Whiskey Ring scandal

Populism


Secret ballot (Australian)

Initiative

Referendum

Recall


Mugwumps

5.04a Create a flow diagram that shows the working of a political machine within a city like New York.
5.04b Review the political cartoons of Thomas Nast and create new cartoons to address issues of the era.
5.04c Compare public reaction to the scandal in the Gilded Age to scandals today.

Thomas Nast political cartoons

Sample civil service exam questions

Current newspaper clippings or magazine articles
Suggested Websites:

http://www.ushistory.com

http://www.americahhistory.about.com

http://www.thomasnast.com/

http://www.lib.ohio-state.edu/cgaweb/nast/





Competency Goal 5: Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

Objective 5.04: (continued) Describe the changing role of government in economic and political affairs.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







5.04d Generate questions that should be on a civil service exam and compare the new questions to actual sample questions from the original exam.


Literature Connections:

Sinclair Lewis: Main Street

Mary Antin: The Promised Land
Fine Arts Connections:

Songs:


“I’ll Take You Home Kathleen”

“Sweet Rosie O’Grady”

“My Wild Irish Rose”

“Hard is the Fortune”

“She’s Only A Bird in A Gilded Cage”




Competency Goal 6: The emergence of the United States in World Affairs (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze causes and effects of the United States emergence as a world power.

Objective 6.01: Examine the factors that led to the United States taking an increasingly active role in world affairs.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Global and military competition
Increased demands for resources and markets
Closing of the Frontier
Exploitation of nations, peoples, and resources


Alfred T. Mahan

Josiah Strong


Frederick Jackson Turner

Imperialism

Spheres of influence


6.01a Compare and contrast the U. S. justification for continental expansion versus expansion abroad.
6.01b Have students write responses to Kipling’s White Man’s Burden.


George Washington’s Farewell Address

Monroe Doctrine

Albert Beveridge’s Address to Congress on the Philippines

American Anti-Imperialist League Platform



Audio &Visual Resources:

“Our Century” by Bill Moyers, PBS

“The Hunt for Pancho Villa” PBS

Suggested Websites:

http://www.spanam.com

http://www.smplanet.com/imperialism/toc.html

http://www.boondocks.net

http://www.loc.gov.com





Competency Goal 6: The emergence of the United States in World Affairs (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze causes and effects of the United States emergence as a world power.

Objective 6.01: (continued) Examine the factors that led to the United States taking an increasingly active role in world affairs.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







6.01c Examine or draw political cartoons that represent supporting and opposing views of imperialism.



Literature Connections:

Rudyard Kipling: White Man’s Burden

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/Kipling.html
Josiah Strong: Our Country

http://alpha.furman.edu/~benson/docs/jstrongperils.htm
Robert Rydell: All The World’s A Fair
Fine Arts Connections:

Picture Fronts of John Philip Sousa marches

Photographs of President T. Roosevelt

In the machines in Panama: Library

Of Congress






Competency Goal 6: The emergence of the United States in World Affairs (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze causes and effects of the United States emergence as a world power.

Objective 6.02: Identify the areas of the United States military, economic, and political involvement and influence.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Causes and conduct of the Spanish-American War
United States Interventions in

Hawaii


Latin America

Caribbean

Asia/Pacific


Queen Liliuokalani

Seward’s Folly

Treaty of Paris 1898

Platt Amendment

“Splendid Little War”

Social Darwinism

Philippines

Commodore George Dewey

Theodore Roosevelt

Rough Riders

William Randolph Hearst

Joseph Pulitzer


USS Maine

Panama Canal

Pancho Villa Raids



6.02a Design a chart that details the specifics of United States involvement in Cuba, Hawaii, Latin America/ Caribbean, and Asia/Pacific.
6.02b Analyze and discuss some examples of “yellow journalism” from the period and from today.



George Washington’s Farewell Address

Monroe Doctrine

Albert Beveridge’s Address to Congress on the Philippines

American Anti-Imperialist League Platform

Aguinaldo’s “Pleas for Independence”, The Outlook, July 28, 1899

Audio &Visual Resources

Excerpts from film: ”Citizen Kane”



Suggested Websites:

http://www.smplanet.com/imperialism

http://www.spanamwar.com/

http://www.history.ohio-state.edu/projects/mckin

http://www.humbolt.edu/~jcb10/yellow.html

http://www.montauklife.com/teddy98.html




Competency Goal 6: The emergence of the United States in World Affairs (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze causes and effects of the United States emergence as a world power.

Objective 6.02: (continued) Identify the areas of the United States military, economic, and political involvement and influence.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







6.02c Map the pattern of United States imperial activities around the world.


Literature Connections:

Edgar Lee Masters: Spoon River Anthology:

Tombstone for Harry Wilmans”



Stanley Karnow: In Our Image (1989)

Frank Friedel: The Splendid Little War (1958)

W. Lederer & E. Burdick: The Ugly American (1958)

Fine Arts Connections:

Songs and Marches of John Philip Sousa

Photographs of the White Squadron and The Maine, courtesy of the Navy Department




Competency Goal 6: The emergence of the United States in World Affairs (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze causes and effects of the United States emergence as a world power.

Objective 6.03: Describe how the policies and actions of the United States government impacted the affairs of other countries.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Intervention vs. Isolation
Support for and opposition to United States economic intervention
Perception of the United States as a world power

“Jingoism”

Dollar Diplomacy

Platt Amendment

Roosevelt Corollary

Anti-Imperialism League

Missionary (Moral) Diplomacy

Boxer Rebellion

Open Door Policy

Annexation of Hawaii

Annexation of Hawaii



6.03a Create a chart comparing Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson’s foreign policies in Latin American and the Caribbean. Include the outcomes of actions.

6.03b In a role-play activity, present the views of leaders of the period.

6.03c Using the argument from the

May 17, 1898, “Report of the Committee on Foreign Affairs on House Res. 259,” ask students to hold a hearing on the annexation of Hawaii.




House of Representatives Report 1355, 55th Congress, 2nd Session

The 1897 Petition Against the Annexation of Hawaii,

September 11, 1897

Platt Amendment



Audio &Visual Resources:

Crucible of Empire-The Spanish American War” PBS

Hawaii’s Tart Queen”, PBS, The American Experience

Video by Tom Coffman: “Nation Within: The Story of America’s Annexation of Hawaii”

Suggested Websites:

http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/gp/17661.htm

http://wwwamericanpresident.org/history/

http://www.civics-online.org/library




Competency Goal 6: The emergence of the United States in World Affairs (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze causes and effects of the United States emergence as a world power.

Objective 6.03: (continued) Describe how the policies and actions of the United States government impacted the affairs of other countries.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







6.03d Ask students to reveal why the 1897 “Petition Against Annexation” is important to Hawaiians and other Americans. Brainstorm cases of similar incidents of neglect in recorded history.


Literature Connections:

Tom Coffman: Nation Within*

Mark Twain: Anti-Imperialist Writings:

The War Prayer”



Jose Marti –poetry

Christinia Garcia: Dreaming in Cuban 1993

Excerpts from James Michener: Hawaii

Fine Arts Connections:

Joseph Hirsch: “The Hero” NMAA

Song: “Aloha Oe”




Competency Goal 7: The Progressive Movement in the United States (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze the economic, political, and social reforms of the Progressive Period.

Objective 7.01: Explain the conditions that led to the rise of Progressivism.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Corruption and ineffectiveness of government
Immigration and urban poor
Working conditions
Emergence of Social Gospel
Unequal distribution of wealth


Muckraking

Ida Tarbell

Lincoln Steffens

Upton Sinclair

Jacob Riis

Urban slums

Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire


7.01a Divide the class into sample groups (i.e. presidential cabinet, state governors, women’s clubs, and selected ethnic groups). Give each group a problem to resolve from their perspective. Chart their solutions on a graph line illustrating all views from far right to far left.
7.01b Define the term “radical”. Evaluate excerpts of muckraking articles based on the definition.


Suggested Websites:

http://www.census.gov

http://www.nara.gov

http://www.loc.gov

http://www.bartleby.com/65/mu/muckrake.html
Literature Connections:

Lincoln Steffans: Struggle for Self Government and Shame of the Cities

Sinclair Lewis: The Jungle

An zia Yezierska: Hungary Hearts

Jacob Riis: How the Other Half Lives

Other readings from O’Henry, Chopin, London, Crane, Stone

Copy of Emma Lazarus Poem “The New Colossus” 1883






Competency Goal 7: The Progressive Movement in the United States (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze the economic, political, and social reforms of the Progressive Period.

Objective 7.01: (continued) Explain the conditions that led to the rise of Progressivism.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities










Fine Arts Connections:

Thomas Dewing: “Walt Whitman” NMAA

Winslow Homer: “Bear Hunting”

Charles Burchfield: “Lightning and Thunder at Night”

Thomas Eakins: “Poleman in the Ma’sh”, “The Banjo Player” NMAA

“Dr. Albert Getchell” North Carolina Museum, and “Singing a Pathetic Song”

Corcoran Gallery, D.C.




Competency Goal 7: The Progressive Movement in the United States (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze the economic, political, and social reforms of the Progressive Period.

Objective 7.02: Analyze how different groups of Americans made economic and political gains in the Progressive Period.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

The roles of the Progressive presidents:

Roosevelt

Taft

Wilson
The growing power of the electorate


The changing roles and influence of women
The impact of political and economic changes on the working class
The changing nature of state and local governments



Jane Addams/Hull House

16th Amendment

17th Amendment

18th Amendment

(Volstead Act)



19th Amendment

Carrie A. Nation

Anthracite Coal Strike

Sherman Anti-Trust Act North



Northern Securities v U.S., 1904

American Tobacco v U.S., 1911

US v EC Kight &Co, 1895

Payne Aldrich Tariff, 1909

Mann Elkins Act

Robert LaFollette

Election of 1912

Progressive/Bull Moose Party

Federal Reserve Act


7.02a Compare the party platforms for the election of 1912. Determine which candidate was the true progressive. Justify your position.
7.02b Select one progressive law/amendment. Identify groups most impacted by the law and whether the law’s objective was achieved.



Charts and maps showing results of the election of 1912

Supreme Court Cases summaries



Audio &Visual Resources:

“America 1900” American Experience, PBS

“Meet with In St. Louis” musical

“Ragtime” musical



Suggested Websites:

http://www.americanpresident.org

http://www.multied.com/elections/1912.htm

http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h883.html

http://www.history.ohio-state.edu/projects/coal/1902anthracitestrike





Competency Goal 7: The Progressive Movement in the United States (1890-1914) – The learner will analyze the economic, political, and social reforms of the Progressive Period.

Objective 7.02: (continued) Analyze how different groups of Americans made economic and political gains in the Progressive Period.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







7.02c Using the music of a popular song, rewrite the words to become a “trust-busting” song. Teach the new lyrics to the class.



Literature Connections:

Upton Sinclair: The Jungle

Lincoln Steffens: The Shame of the City

W. E. Dubois: The Souls of Black Folk

Langston Hughes: “Share Cropper”

Louis Harlan: Booker T. Washington, The Wizard of Tuskegee

Fine Arts Connections:

Charles Burchfield: “Lightning and Thunder at Night” 1920 NMAA

Umberto Boccioni: The City Rises, 1910, Museum of Modern Art, N.Y.

Photographs of Alice Roosevelt

Song:

“Alice Blue Gown”



“Meet Me In St. Louis, Louie”



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