Curriculum document state board of education howard n. Lee, C



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Competency Goal 8: The Great War and Its Aftermath (1914-1930) - The learner will analyze United States involvement in World War I and the war’s influence on international affairs during the 1920s.

Objective 8.01: Examine the reasons why the United States remained neutral at the beginning of World War I, but later became involved.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Causes of World War I in Europe
Use of and effects of propaganda
U. S. anti-war Sentiment
Reasons for U. S. entry into The Great War


Nationalism

Militarism

Alliances

Archduke Francis Ferdinhand

U-Boat submarine warfare

Serbia


Allies

Central Powers

Kaiser Wilhelm II

Contraband

Zimmerman Telegram

Lusitania

Mobilization

Election of 1916

Woodrow Wilson

Isolationists




8.01a Compare pro and con war propaganda posters and explain their influence on the United State’s decision to go to war.
8.01b Create and compare maps of Europe in 1914 and 1918, and discuss the reasons for changes.
8.01c Research how European countries viewed the United States neutrality.



Wilson’s War Message to Congress, 1917

Sussex Pledge

Uncle Sam’s “I Want You” recruitment poster

http://www.archives.gov/exhibit_hall/powers_of_persuasion/powers_of_persuasion_home.html
Zimmerman Telegram

http://www.archives.gov/digital_classroom/lessons/zimmermann_telegram/zimmermann_telegram.html
Copies of newspaper headlines

Audio &Visual Resources

Original movie: “A Farewell to Arms”



Suggested Websites:

Propaganda Posters



http://www.archives.gov/digital_classroom/lessons/analysis_worksheets/poster
http://www.library.georgetown.edu/dept/speccoll/amposter.htm
http://www.iisg.nl/exhibitions/chairman/
http://www.pbs.org/greatwar/




Competency Goal 8: The Great War and Its Aftermath (1914-1930) - The learner will analyze United States involvement in World War I and the war’s influence on international affairs during the 1920s.

Objective 8.01: (continued) Examine the reasons why the United States remained neutral at the beginning of World War I, but later became involved.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities




Selective Service Act

Jeanette Rankin

“Make the world safe for democracy”

Idealism
(The first 13 terms should have been introduced in World History and are reviewed here.)




8.01d Form country groups and debate whether or not the United States should enter WWI from the perspective of the country assigned.


Literature Connections:

Ernest Hemingway: A Farewell to Arms
Barbara Tuchman: The Guns of August
Fine Arts Connections:

Photographs from Versailles

Interactive Site:

http://www.learn.co.uk/versailles/
WWI Government Posters

http://www.firstworldwar.com/posters/




Competency Goal 8: The Great War and Its Aftermath (1914-1930) - The learner will analyze United States involvement in World War I and the war’s influence on international affairs during the 1920s.

Objective 8.02: Identify political and military turning points of the war and determine their significance to the outcome of the conflict.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

The importance of United States involvement in World War I
Modernization of warfare
The changing nature of United States foreign policy
Key factors in the Allies’ success
Failure of the United States to ratify the Treaty of Versailles


John J. Pershing

American Expeditionary Force

Trench warfare

“No Man’s Land”

Mustard gas

Doughboys

Armistice

Fourteen Points (1-5, 14)

“The Big Four”

“Peace without victory”

Russian and Bolshevik Revolutions

Treaty of Versailles

League of Nations

Henry Cabot Lodge

17th Amendment

18th Amendment

19th Amendment

(Repeats on amendments)

(again, review of key

world history events)



8.02a Compare the Fourteen Points with the whole Treaty of Versailles in regard to preventing future conflicts.
8.02b Listen to George M. Cohan’s “Over There” and discuss the impact of patriotic music on the war effort.
8.02c Compare Woodrow Wilson’s arguments supporting a League of Nations and Henry Cabot Lodge’s “14 Reservations”.



1918 Battle Map of Europe

Wilson’s Fourteen Points

Treaty of Versailles

Audio &Visual Resources:

“Sergeant York” movie with Gary Cooper: Twentieth Century Fox, 1941

“In Love and War” movie about Ernest Hemingway in WWI

Recordings from WWI and radio spots

Suggested Websites:

http://www.schoolhistory.org.uk/warpoems.htm

http://www.learn.co.uk/Versailles

http://europeanhistory.about

http://www.melodyland.net/ww1/htm

http://www.teachervision.com





Competency Goal 8: The Great War and Its Aftermath (1914-1930) - The learner will analyze United States involvement in World War I and the war’s influence on international affairs during the 1920s.

Objective 8.02: (continued) Identify political and military turning points of the war and determine their significance to the outcome of the conflict.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







8.02d Identify similarities and differences in strategies, tactics, and weaponry of World War I and the Spanish-American War.


Literature Connections:

Enrich Remarque: All Quiet On the Western Front



Fine Arts Connections:

Songs:

George M. Cohan: “Over There”

“When Johnny Comes Marching Home”

Irving Berlin: “Oh How I Hate To Get Up in the Morning”

Billy Alexander: “Our Dear Daddy Soldier-Boy”






Competency Goal 8: The Great War and Its Aftermath (1914-1930) - The learner will analyze United States involvement in World War I and the war’s influence on international affairs during the 1920s.

Objective 8.03: Assess the political, economic, social and cultural effects of the war on the United States and other nations.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Adjustment from wartime to a peacetime economy
Government bureaucracy in the United States
Anti-immigration sentiment and the first Red Scare
Restrictions on civil liberties during wartime
Political changes in Europe and the near East
Impact of isolationism on American foreign policy


Industrial workers of the World

Self-determination

Committee on Public Information/George Creel Food Administration/

Herbert Hoover

War Industries Board/Bernard Baruch

Ku Klux Plan

Palmer/Palmer Raids

Espionage and Sedition Acts

Eugene V. Debs

Schenck v United States, 1919

Sacco and Vanzetti

John L. Lewis (United Mine Workers)

Washington Naval Conference

Dawes Plan



8.03a Discuss ways in which World War I contributed to the growing revolution in Russia.

8.03b Describe correlations on restrictions on civil liberties during World War I and other periods of United States military conflicts.

8.03c Prepare a compare/contrast essay on how the U. S. and German economies were affected by the war.


Espionage Act

Sedition Act

Wilson’s Fourteen Points

Henry Cabot Lodge’s 14 Reservations

Charter for the League of Nations

Treaty of Versailles

Schenck v. United States

Audio and Visual Resources:

“Return to Isolationism: Between the Wars” Vol. 127, PBS

Suggested Websites:

http://www.ushistory.org/documents/creeds.htm

http://www.archives.gov/records-of-congress

http://www.kileenroos.com/link/ww1.html





Competency Goal 8: The Great War and Its Aftermath (1914-1930) - The learner will analyze United States involvement in World War I and the war’s influence on international affairs during the 1920s.

Objective 8.03: (continued) Assess the political, economic, social and cultural effects of the war on the United States and other nations.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







8.03d Develop pictorial representations of these terms: liberty bonds, ration books, demobilization, victory gardens, and ultra nationalism.

Literature Connections:

Gene Smith: When The Cheering Stopped

David Kennedy: Over There

Fine Arts Connections:

Songs:


George M. Cohan: “Over There”

“When Johnny Comes Marching Home”

Irving Berlin: “Oh How I Hate To Get Up in the Morning”

Billy Alexander: “Our Dear Daddy Soldier-Boy”

Library of Congress Photos of Wilson and Hoover, Coolidge and Hoover





Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.01: Elaborate on the cycle of economic boom and bust in the 1920’s and 1930’s.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

The impact of presidential policies on economic activity (Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, and Roosevelt)
Rise and/or decline of major industries in the United States
Factors leading to the stock market crash and the onset of the Great Depression

“Return to Normalcy”

laissez-faire

Teapot Dome scandal

Albert Fall

Hawley-Smoot Tariff

Speculation

Buying on the margin

Mechanization

“Black Tuesday”

Rugged individualism

Direct relief




9.01a Write a letter to President Hoover about the state of the economy in 1929. Propose ways the economy can be improved.

9.01b Use political cartoons to analyze public reactions to political and economic events of the time period.

9.01c Plan a 1920’s fair to include music, movies, and new inventions. Invite other classes to visit. Use a student designed rubric.


Biographical information on key figures:

Henry Ford, Presidents Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover



Audio &Visual Resources:

“Riding the Rails” PBS Video, The American Experience.

Movie: “The Grapes of Wrath”

Suggested Websites:

http://www.pbs.org/fmc/timeline/estockmktcrash.htm

http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents

http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/herblock/

http://www.pinzler.com/ushistory/ruggedsupp.html.

http://artzia.com/history/depression





Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.01: (continued) Elaborate on the cycle of economic boom and bust in the 1920’s and 1930’s.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







9.01d Study the photographs of Dorothea Lange and hold a discussion on the “mood’ of the nation as displayed in her work.


Literature Connections:

John Steinbeck: The Grapes of Wrath

John Kenneth Galbraith: The Great Crash of 1929. 1961

Sinclair Lewis: Babbitt. Reissue Ed. 1989

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/LEWIS/BABBIT/ch01.html

Frederick Allen: Only Yesterday 1964.

Thomas Wolfe: Of Time and The River.

Fine Arts Connections:

Photographs of Dorothea Lange: MMA



http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/wcf/wcf0013.html

Alexandre Hogue: “Drought Stricken Area” 1930 NMAA

William Johnson: Early Morning Work. 1940 NMAA





Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.02: Analyze the extent of prosperity for different segments of society during this period.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Consumer spending habit and trends
Difficulties of farmers
Response to Prosperity: the stock market crash, Dust Bowl, Bonus Army march and bank failures on various groups of the population

Easy credit

Installment plan

Overproduction

Hoovervilles

Soup kitchens



Breadlines


9.02a Make a list of the economic problems of the 20’s that led to the stock market crash. Examine the effects of these problems on different segments of society.
9.02b Analyze Dorothea Lange’s famous “Migrant Worker” photograph.



Fine Arts Connections:

Song lyrics of the period

Audio & Visual Resources:

Suggested Websites:

http://www.arts.unimelb.edu.au/amu/ucr/student/1997/Yee/1929.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/library/financial/index-1929-crash.html

http://www.americanpresidents.org/gallery

Literature Connections:

Ernest Hemingway: The End of Something

Works of Langston Hughes, Marcus Garvey, Countee Cullen, Zora Neale Hurston.






Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.02: (continued) Analyze the extent of prosperity for different segments of society during this period.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







9.02c Play the song and interpret the lyrics of “Brother, Can You Spare A Dime”. Add a new set of verses for later economic downturns.
9.02d Collect and display examples of the many ways segments of the society did not experience prosperity.

Fine Arts Connections:

Songs:

Woody Guthrie: “Talking Dust Bowl Blues”

Art:

John Stuart Curry: “Our Good Earth” NMAA

William H. Johnson: “Street Life-Harlem”, NMAA: “Station Stop, Red Cross Ambulance, NMAA

Beauford Delaney: “Can Fire in the Park”, NMAA
Songs from the Great Depression:

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/afctshtml/tshome.html






Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.03: Analyze the significance of social, intellectual and technological changes of lifestyle in the United States.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

The impact of mass media
Public response to the Great Depression
The Harlem Renaissance
Prohibition
Leisure time and spectator sports


Radio

Market/advertising

Jazz

Silent and “talkies” films



“The Jazz Singer”

Lost Generation

Langston Hughes

Louis Armstrong

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Ernest Hemingway

Sinclair Lewis

Speakeasies

Bootleggers

Babe Ruth

Charles Lindbergh

Automobiles

FDR’s “Fireside Chats”



9.03a Create a radio show typical of the 20’s and 30s; broadcast live.
9.03b Using a graphic organizer illustrate the quote; “the 1920’s were either the best of times or the worst of times.”
9.03c Compare Prohibition in the 1920’s to the debate over drug use today.



Audio & Visual Resources:

“Elmer Gantry” movie by United Artists

“The Great Gatsby” movie

Audio recordings of the 1920’s and 1930’s with broadcasts of sports events, news programs, musical and variety shows, religious broadcasts, comedies and dramas

“Jazz” by Ken Burns. PBS Video

Suggested Websites:

http://newdeal.feri.org

http://jazzbabies.com

http://geocities.com/flapperculture

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/dustbowl

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/lindbergh

http://www.teachervision.com/lesson+plans

http://www.nl.edu.ace.resources/locke.htm





Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.03: (continued) Analyze the significance of social, intellectual and technological changes of lifestyle in the United States.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







9.03d Evaluate the appropriateness of the terms: “Great Depression” or “Roaring 20’s”. Base your evaluation on oral histories, journals, and historic accounts of events.
9.03e Create a “Hooverville” scenario with a soup kitchen, bread lines and handouts. Reflect and volunteer in a current soup kitchen.

Literature Connections:

Alan Locke: The New Negro

Paul Sann: The Lawless Decade, 1971

F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby

Langston Hughes: Simple Stories

Fine Arts Connections:

Stuart Davis: “Abstraction” 1937 NMAA

Jacob Lawrence: “Rooftops” 1943 Hirshhorn Museum

Thomas Hart Benton: “Engineer’s Dream”, 1931, Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Tenn.

Reginald Marsh: “Twenty-Cent Movie”, 1936, Whitney Museum, N.Y.




Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.04: Describe challenges to traditional practices in religion, race, and gender.


Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

The “Back to Africa” movement and Pan-Africanism
The Fundamentalist versus Freethinking movement
Religion in politics
The changing role of women


Zora Neal Hurston

Marcus Garvey

United Negro Improvement Association

W.E.B. Dubois (repeat)

Fundamentalism

Scopes Trial

Aimee Semple McPherson

Billy Sunday

Margaret Sanger



9.04a Design a graphic organizer to illustrate the changing role of women in these decades. Use key terms related to changes like flapper, ear bobs, etc.
9.04b Read the excerpt “Returning Soldier,” from The Crisis, by W. E. B. Dubois. How does the reading reflect the challenges to the traditional perceptions of race?


Biographical information on Clarence Darrow, William Jennings Bryan, John Scopes, etc.

“A Flapper’s Appeal to Parents”, Ellen Welles Page, Outlook Magazine, Dec. 6, 1922



Audio &Visual Resources:

Inherit the Wind” video

Marcus Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind”, PBS, The American Experience.

Suggested Websites:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/monkeytrial

http://www.history/ohio-state.edu/projects/clash/scopes/scopes-page1.htm

http://www.rambova.com/fasion/fash4

http://www.interlife.org/woman.html






Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.04: (continued) Describe challenges to traditional practices in religion, race, and gender.

Major Concepts


Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







9.04c Compare the UNIA with the NAACP. Report findings using a graphic organizer or multimedia presentation.
9.04d Create a cause and effect diagram to illustrate the clash between the Fundamentalist and the Freethinking movements.


Literature Connections:

Margaret Sanger: Woman and the New Race

Robert S. and Helen M. Lynd: Middletown.

Paul Sann: The Lawless Decade

Fine Arts Connections:

Paul Cadmus: “Main Street”, 1937 Midtown Galleries, N. Y.

Millard Sheets: “Tenement Flats”, 1934, National Collection of Fine Arts, National Park Service

Joseph Vavak: “Women of Flint”, 1937, WPA Art Project.






Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.05: Assess the impact of the New Deal reforms in enlarging the role of the federal government in American life.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Responses to the New Deal program
The Three R’s (Relief, Recovery, Reform)
Expansion of the role of federal government

Deficit spending

Social Security

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)

Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

Public Works Administration (PWA)

Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)

Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA)

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA)

Works Progress Administration (WPA)




9.05a Analyze the effectiveness and impact of New Deal policies from the perspective of: an historian, a political scientist, a geographer and economist.
9.05b Listen to a recording of a “Fireside Chat”. Write a response.
9.05c Create a poem, rap or dance movement explaining the variety of New Deal programs of alphabet soup.

Political cartoons of FDR and the Supreme Court

Biographical information on FDR and Eleanor

“Roosevelt Rap” and accompanying questions

Audio &Visual Resources:

Audio clips from FDR’s speeches and Fireside Chats



Suggested Websites:

http://newdeal.feri.org/attic/index.htm

http://www.ssa.gov/history/hlong1.html

http://historymatters.gmu.edu/

http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/audio.html

http://www.mhric.org/fdr/fdr.html

http://www.museum.tv/mbcfdr.shtml




Competency Goal 9: Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of “The Twenties” and “The Thirties”.


Objective 9.05: (continued) Assess the impact of the New Deal reforms in enlarging the role of the federal government in American life.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities




National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act)

Fair Labor Standards Act

Father Charles Coughlin

Huey P. Long

Frances Perkins


9.05d Using http//newdeal.feri.org/attic/index.htm find the Dear Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt letter. Read and write a response making recommendations for assistance.
9.05e Design a foldable poster that explains bank failures, bank holidays, brain trust, court packing plan and FDR’s 100 days.



Literature Connections:

Goodwyn: The Populist Moment

W.E. B. Dubois: Biography of a Race

Thornton Wilder: Our Town

Works of Langston Hughes, Marcus Garvey, McKay, Countee Cullen, Zora Neale Hurston.
Fine Arts Connections:

Photographs of FDR on the radio: Library of Congress

WPA Federal Project Art work

Joe Jones: “Street Scene”, 1933, National Collection of Fine Arts

Elizabeth Olds: “Scrap Iron”. 1935. WPA, National Collection of Fine Arts




Competency Goal 10: World War II and the Beginning of the Cold War (1930-1963) - The learner will analyze the United States involvement in World War II and the war’s influence on international affairs in the following decades.


Objective 10.01: Identify military, political, and diplomatic turning points of the war and determine their significance to the outcome and aftermath of the conflict.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities

Appeasement
Isolationism
Reparations
Totalitarianism Governments
Treaty of Versailles
Worldwide depression

Adolf Hitler

Benito Mussolini

Emperor Hirohito

Winston Churchill

Fascism

Joseph Stalin



Munich Pact

Third Reich

Four Freedoms

Kellogg-Briand Pact

Lend-Lease Act

Neutrality Acts

Non-Aggression Pact

Pearl Harbor

Quarantine Speech
(The terms in the top of the column are review from World History)


10.01a Compare reasons for the public’s desire for neutrality to FDR’s shift to intervention.

10.01b Suggest alternatives for the U.S. policies of isolation and appeasement in the 1930’s.

10.01c Construct an annotated timeline highlighting the rise of Nazism, Fascism, and the Axis aggression that led to Europe’s declaration of war in 1939. Locate key areas of the timeline on a map.


FDR’s Chautauqua Speech, 1934

Interviews with local individuals who lived during the 1930’s



Audio &Visual Resources:

Tora, Tora, Tora” excerpts

South Pacific” (musical) excerpts

Suggested Websites:

http://history.acusd.edu/gen/WW2Timeline/start.html

http://www.nv.cc.va.us/home/nvsageh/Hist122/Part3/1920WWII1940.htm

http://history.acusd.edu/gen/WW2Timeline/fortune-map.html

http://www2.sjsu.edu/depts/commstudies/woz/woz3/woz3b.html.





Competency Goal 10: World War II and the Beginning of the Cold War (1930-1963) - The learner will analyze the United States involvement in World War II and the war’s influence on international affairs in the following decades.


Objective 10.01: (continued) Identify military, political, and diplomatic turning points of the war and determine their significance to the outcome and aftermath of the conflict.

Major Concepts

Terms

Thinking Skills and Suggested Activities for Students

Resources: Primary, Secondary, Technology Audio/Visual/Documents for listed activities







10.01d Using an outline map, label key regions of aggression in Europe, Africa, the Pacific, during WWII. Include the allied powers and the axis powers in a map key.


Literature Connections:

Selections from Welty, O’Conner, Porter, Pound, Eliot, Miller, Frost, Sandberg, Cummings, Russell

Frederick Allen: Only Yesterday

John Morton, Blum: V Was for Victory

1977

Fine Arts Connections:

Art of Norman Rockwell: “Four Freedoms”, “A Nation’s Hero”, “The Tattooist”, “Homecoming GI” “Thanksgiving”





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