December 2011 Teacher's Guide Table of Contents



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December 2011 Teacher's Guide
Table of Contents



About the Guide 3

Student Questions (from the articles) 4

Answers to Student Questions 6

ChemMatters Puzzle: Chem Anagrams 11

Answers to the ChemMatters Puzzle 12

NSES Correlation 13

Anticipation Guides 14

Mmmm . . . Flavorful Food! 15

Hold the Meat! 16

Changing the Course of Diabetes 17

Your Body Under Construction 18

Titanic: Was It Doomed by Chemistry? 19

Mmmm. . . Flavorful Food 21

Hold the Meat! 22

Changing the Curse of Diabetes 23

Your Body Under Construction 24

Titanic: Was It Doomed by Chemistry? 25

Mmmm … Flavorful Food! 26

Background Information (teacher information) 26

Connections to Chemistry Concepts (for correlation to course curriculum) 32

Possible Student Misconceptions (to aid teacher in addressing misconceptions) 32

Anticipating Student Questions (answers to questions students might ask in class) 32

In-class Activities (lesson ideas, including labs & demonstrations) 33

Out-of-class Activities and Projects (student research, class projects) 34

References (non-Web-based information sources) 34

Web Sites for Additional Information (Web-based information sources) 35

Hold the Meat! 38

Background Information (teacher information) 38

Connections to Chemistry Concepts (for correlation to course curriculum) 47

Possible Student Misconceptions (to aid teacher in addressing misconceptions) 47

Anticipating Student Questions (answers to questions students might ask in class) 48

In-class Activities (lesson ideas, including labs & demonstrations) 48

Out-of-class Activities and Projects (student research, class projects) 49

References (non-Web-based information sources) 50

Web Sites for Additional Information (Web-based information sources) 52

Changing the Course of Diabetes 53

Background Information (teacher information) 53

Connections to Chemistry Concepts (for correlation to course curriculum) 67

Possible Student Misconceptions (to aid teacher in addressing misconceptions) 67

Anticipating Student Questions (answers to questions students might ask in class) 68

In-class Activities (lesson ideas, including labs & demonstrations) 68

Out-of-class Activities and Projects (student research, class projects) 70

References (non-Web-based information sources) 71

Web Sites for Additional Information (Web-based information sources) 74

Your Body Under Construction 79

Background Information (teacher information) 79

Connections to Chemistry Concepts (for correlation to course curriculum) 88

Possible Student Misconceptions (to aid teacher in addressing misconceptions) 89

Anticipating Student Questions (answers to questions students might ask in class) 89

In-class Activities (lesson ideas, including labs & demonstrations) 89

Out-of-class Activities and Projects (student research, class projects) 90

References (non-Web-based information sources) 90

Web Sites for Additional Information (Web-based information sources) 91

Titanic: Doomed by Chemistry? 93

Background Information (teacher information) 93

Connections to Chemistry Concepts (for correlation to course curriculum) 101

Possible Student Misconceptions (to aid teacher in addressing misconceptions) 102

Anticipating Student Questions (answers to questions students might ask in class) 103

In-class Activities (lesson ideas, including labs & demonstrations) 103

Out-of-class Activities and Projects (student research, class projects) 106

References (non-Web-based information sources) 107

Web Sites for Additional Information (Web-based information sources) 108

About the Guide

Teacher’s Guide editors William Bleam, Donald McKinney, Ronald Tempest, and Erica K. Jacobsen created the Teacher’s Guide article material. E-mail: bbleam@verizon.net


Susan Cooper prepared the national science education content, anticipation guides, and reading guides.
David Olney created the puzzle.

E-mail: djolney@verizon.net


Patrice Pages, ChemMatters editor, coordinated production and prepared the Microsoft Word and PDF versions of the Teacher’s Guide. E-mail: chemmatters@acs.org
Articles from past issues of ChemMatters can be accessed from a CD that is available from the American Chemical Society for $30. The CD contains all ChemMatters issues from February 1983 to April 2008.
The ChemMatters CD includes an Index that covers all issues from February 1983 to April 2008.
The ChemMatters CD can be purchased by calling 1-800-227-5558.
Purchase information can be found online at www.acs.org/chemmatters

Student Questions (from the articles)


Mmmm … Flavorful Food!


    1. What two senses combine to produce what we perceive as flavor? Which of the two senses provides the most dominant aspect of flavor?

    2. What additional information besides taste and smell can contribute to what we perceive as the flavor of a food or beverage?

    3. Where do chemists obtain natural and artificial flavors shown in a food’s ingredients list?

    4. Do we need all the flavor compounds in a food to recreate its flavor? Explain.

    5. From where do artificial flavors get their characteristic odor?

    6. How can one achieve different odors when producing esters?

    7. Describe the career path of a flavor chemist.

    8. Besides in food, where else do you find esters?



Hold the Meat! Meat-Free Food Takes a Seat at the Table


  1. Name three sources of protein other than meat.

  2. What is the basic chemical component (molecule) of protein?

  3. What is the basic structure of the protein collagen?

  4. List three reasons why our bodies need amino acids in the diet.

  5. What is so special about essential amino acids?

  6. In terms of essential amino acids, how does plant protein differ from animal protein?

  7. List the major steps in forming tofu from soybean.

  8. How does the process for producing tempeh differ essentially from that used to produce tofu?

  9. How does the mold growing on soybean change the bean’s protein into tempeh?

  10. What is the source of protein used to make seitan?

  11. How is gluten used to form seitan?

  12. What is needed to make Tofurky?



Changing the Course of Diabetes


  1. Why is research being done to create an artificial pancreas?

  2. What are polymers?

  3. Why are polymers used in medical devices?

  4. What are monomers?

  5. Name the two categories of polymers and give an example of each.

  6. What is the main function of the polymer structure in the artificial pancreas?

  7. How do chemists accomplish this function in the polymer?

  8. Name two other materials that have been used in artificial pancreas research, and describe the problem(s) associated with each.

  9. What is the status of the research, as of the date of the article, and where do researchers go from here?

  10. Name three other areas of medical research where polymers play an important role.



Your Body Under Construction


  1. In which organs of the body are hormones produced?

  2. Name the hormone responsible for male sex characteristics.

  3. What are androgens?

  4. What is anabolism and how does it involve hormones?

  5. Describe the concept of molecular “form and function” discussed in the article.

  6. What molecular structure do all steroid hormones have in common?

  7. Name the hormones responsible for female sex characteristics.


Titanic: Was It Doomed by Chemistry?


  1. Give two reasons to explain why the ship makers who constructed Titanic believed it was unsinkable.

  2. After Titanic struck the iceberg, why did it sink?

  3. What was responsible for the overnight deaths of the people in the still floating in the water?

  4. Why do objects float?

  5. What changed to cause Titanic to sink? Explain in terms of your answer to question 4.

  6. What are the two forces acting on any floating object, and in what direction does each act?

  7. What two new discoveries occurred, after studying pieces of Titanic’s “remains” from the ocean floor, which changed researchers’ understanding of the possible causes for her sinking?

  8. What is steel?

  9. Explain the role of sulfur in the construction of Titanic.

  10. What role might slag possibly have played in the sinking?

  11. Give four reasons cited by the author for believing that ships today are much safer than they were in the time of Titanic.

  12. Does the author believe that ships today are unsinkable?





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