District profile Haripur Introduction


partment district Haripur, Census 1996 & 2006 and Primary data



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Source: Livestock department district Haripur, Census 1996 & 2006 and Primary data

Roads and Communication

Haripur is at a distance of 125 km (Haripur town 164 km from Peshawar). Karakorum Highway separates from Peshawar – Islamabad road at Hassan Abdal, while Islamabad – Peshawar motor way could be taken via Burhan, Chach and Ghazi interchanges. Karakorum Highway runs across the whole district of Haripur, links the district with district Attock in the west and district Abbottabad in the east. Other main access roads are Hatar road (Haripur to Taxila), Khanpur road (Haripur to Taxila), Sirikot road (Haripur to Swabi and Attock), Jabri road (Lora to Murree) and Chapper road (Haripur to Durband Mansehra).


Besides, there is a comprehensive network of main and link roads in the district. Most of the roads are metalled, while a few link roads in the hilly areas are un-metalled. Almost all the main villages are accessible through links roads. Farm to market roads play an important role in the development of agriculture. A railway line also passes through the district and links it with Taxila in the south and Havelian of district Abbottabad in the east.

Source: Census 1998, Google Earth and Primary data
PTCL (with 19 telephone exchanges is the land line network that also provides DSL services in the urban / road side areas of the district. Ufone, Telenor, Mobilink and Zong are the mobile networks widely used in the district, while in a few remote hilly areas where PTCL land line has not been extended and mobile networks don’t work, PTCL V wireless is used. In the district, there is one head post office, 26 sub-post offices and 74 branch offices. Besides courier services are available Haripur and Kalabat towns.

History

Haripur district remained a part of several reigns by different dynasties. In 1472 Prince Shahabuddin, a descendant of Amir Timur came to Hazara to lead Karlugh Turks legions left by Amir Timur in 1399, and formed a state known as Pakhli Sarkar in the area. The dynasty continued to rule the area till 1703. Gradually the ruling family was replaced by Afghan invaders i.e. Ahamd Shah and Duranis kept reins of the rule for several years. In 1992 army of Hari Singh Nalwa defeated Duranis and became ruler of the area. The town of Haripur (meaning Hari's town) was founded in 1822 by Hari Singh Nalwa. In 1849 the British Empire annexed the area that became a part of Pakistan in 1947. Haripur remained a Tehsil of district Hazara (1958-1979). As District Abbottabad was established, Haripur remained as its Tehsil till 1992, when Haripur was given the status of District. (Source: Wikipedia)


North western territory of the district i.e. Tanawal area remained a part of the princely state of Amb, ruled by different Pathan Nawab/chieftains, till its merger in Pakistan (1969). Before division of the sub continent, the whole district remained a battle field and many battles were fought between the invading tribes and the existent ones. Besides, Land reforms in 1974-76, by Zulfiqar Ail Bhutto, the former Prime minister of Pakistan, created clashes among land owners and the tenants. Afterward a bylaw, may be a local one, was developed to entitle the tenants with a specific portion of land ownership after a stipulated time. The mechanism has no presence at the moment. (Source: Community)
Economy

Livelihoods Dependency / Sources of Income

In Haripur, 90% HHs are involved in agriculture directly or indirectly but only 10% of them have sufficient food to fulfill their requirements, for the whole year, and they need to meet their other non food needs from other sources. Most of the farmers are small land holders. About 15% HHs have no land and earn their subsistence from daily wages. 30% HHs just have houses and 0.25 – 0.5 acre land. They have grains from their own land just to suffice for a month or two. They do on and off farm labor to support their HH economy. 55% HHs have 5-15 acre land including range lands and forests. They have sufficient grains for their own use. While some members of the HHs do government and private services and labor abroad to meet other non food needs. About 10% HHs have more than 25 acre land including range lands and forests. They sell surplus grains and vegetables/cash crops within the district and outside and do large scale business.


Livelihoods of the whole population relies on Labor 30%, agriculture 25%, livestock 8%, government services 25% and business 12%.Women are equally involved in earning their HH economy. They do government jobs and support male member of the HH in farming. Livestock management is the special responsibility of women in many parts of the district, while in rural areas women do all the small scale agriculture or crop management when their men go out for labor. Besides, they also earn a portion of subsistence economy through embroidery and tailoring, in plain areas. (Source: Community)
Professions & Trade

Census 1998 specified the employment by different professions as; Professionals 6.8%; Legislators, Senior officials & Managers 0.5%, Technicians 4.1 %; Clerks 4.5 %; Service and shop workers 13.3 %; Skilled agriculture workers 29.4 %; Craft and related trade workers 5.7 %; Plant and machine operators 6.4 %; Elementary occupations 28.3 %, Armed forces 1 %. Haripur city is the main trading center where most of the amenities of day to day life are available.




Source: Census 1998.



Industry

Haripur District is comparatively more industrialized than other districts in the Province. There are many large factory units i.e. Telephone Industries of Pakistan, NRTC (National Radio telecommunication Corporation), Best Way Cement and Pak-China fertilizers etc. Besides, Hatar Industrial State is situated in the district and provides thousands of people with labor. At the moment 150 units of different industries are operating in the district which provide employment to approximately 8,743 persons within and outside the district. Details of the industry in the district are as following;




S. No

Sector / Products

Number of Closed Units

Number of Operational Units

Number of Employees

1

Vegetable Ghee & Cooking Oil

3

6

522

2

Flour Mills

1

11

139

3

Biscuit & Sweets

-

5

386

4

Beverages & Mineral Water

-

3

110

5

Ice

-

3

25

6

Preservation of Fruit/Vegetable/Juice

-

5

463

7

Feed

-

5

51

8

Textile (Power Looms)

2

4

170

9

Carpet / Carpet Yarn

2

3

195

10

Hosiery

-

1

21

11

Wood & Wood Products

-

6

165

12

Paper & Paper Board

-

5

184

13

Paper Packages

1

3

101

14

Chemical

2

6

173

15

Pharmacy

1

16

834

16

Match

-

2

346

17

Fertilizer

-

2

180

18

Laundry Soap

-

1

35

19

Rubber and Plastic Goods

2

8

1,003

20

Fiber Glass

-

2

70

21

China Clay & related Products

-

3

26

22

Glass

-

2

310

23

Cement

-

3

1,132

24

Cement Based Construction Material

2

5

110

25

Marble

1

2

15

26

Other Mineral Based Products

2

12

108

27

Metal and Metal Products

1

16

462

28

Electronic Goods & Appliances

1

2

354

29

Telecommunication

-

2

650

30

Detonators

-

2

142

31

Motor Vehicles / Batteries

1

2

250

32

Gases

1

2

11

Total

23

150

8,743

Haripur Chamber of Commerce & Industry since its establishment in 1993 is playing pivotal role for flourishing and development of Commerce & Industry in the area. The Chamber is recognized by the Ministry of Commerce & Securities Exchange Commission of Pakistan. (Source: Industrial Development Office Haripur)


Disaster


A dry stream that gets flooded in rain storms
There is no history of much devastating flash floods, yet in 1992 the entire perennial and rain fed streams of the district were flooded by heavy rain storm that caused damages to human, lands, livestock and infrastructure. Flood in Siran River, mostly in monsoon, causes damages to infrastructure, agriculture lands and human lives. In 1992, the river destroyed agriculture lands and almost all the catchments of irrigation channels. Again in 2010, the flood created a drastic situation in the nearby villages. Besides rain fed gullies and streams/trenches frequently cause soil erosion and damages to farm lands, range lands and livestock. Drought causes less produce and fodders i.e. in some un-irrigated areas in the last 2-4 years people have started to abandon farming. In severe droughts springs get dry and the water table gets low i.e. in 2001-2002 due to prolonged drought, many of the tube wells and springs got dried. In 2005, Earthquake also added to the miseries of people and several houses in the areas adjacent to Mansehra were partially damaged. Besides, heavy rain storms, mostly in hilly areas, are usually accompanied by hailstones and thunders. c:\users\hp\desktop\braced\district haripur\pics\uc_snk\2014-05-09 14.15.48.jpg

(Sources: Public Health Engineering and Soil Conservation Haripur & Primary data from the community)


Major NGOs / Development Initiatives / Projects

NGOs & Development Projects

There are many local NGOs, LSOs Cos and WOs in district Haripur, while many national and international organizations are also working, in collaboration with local organizations, in different sectors and geographical areas. A brief illustration of the major NGOs and their projects is as following;




NGO / Project

Address / Cntacts

Working UCs

Development Initiatives

Pakistani Hosalamand Khawateen Network

Muhallah Afzal Abad, Jail Road, Haripur

0995 627038



UCs Bait Gali and Amazai

  • UNDP funded Global Environmental Facilitation /Small Grants Programme (GEF/SGP)

HADAF Development Foundation

G.T Road, Haripur

0995 610981



UCs Muslim Abad, Bait Gali and Amazai

  • Development activities

  • Water supply and street pavement

Sarhad Rural Support Programme

Village Pandak, Talokar Road, Haripur

0995 613660



District Haripur

  • Improvement and functionality  of PTC's in the schools through CESSD Project

Save the Children

Swat Chowk, Hatar Road, Haripur

0995 614208



UCs Kot Najibullah, Panian, Dheenda, Khalabat Town Ship and Panian

SUNGI Development Foundation

Muhallah Soka, Haripur

0345 8590551



UCs Bandi Sher Khan, Pind Kamal Khan, Pind Hashim Khan, Manakrai, Breela, Hattar, Kot Najibullah, Rehana, Kundi and Khairbara 

  • Advocacy through AAWAZ Accountability Program

  • FAFEN: Voter Education, registration and monitoring of Election

  • Micro Finance

Rural Development Programme

Muhallah Naseem Town, Hatar Road, Haripur

0995 615502



District Haripur

  • Development activities

  • No specific project at the moment

Marrie Stope Society

Tehsil Road, Opposite Boys High School No.2, Haripur

0995 615581



District Haripur

  • Reproductive Health

Pakistan Red Crescent Society

Kalabat township, Haripur

District Haripur

  • Rescue & relief activities

UNDP Refugees Affected Hosting Areas (RAHA)

Village Ger Khan Road, Haripur

0343 9779777



UCs Panian, Dheenda, Sikanderpur and Khalabat Town Ship

  •  Infrastructure development and improvement like health, education, sanitation and drinking water facilities in Refugee Affected Hosting Areas

Beer Development Organization

Muhallah Babu, Turbela Road, Haripur

0995 616624



UC Bir

  • Drinking water supply

National Commission for Human Development

Tehsil Road, Haripur

0995 610556



District Haripur

  • Primary Education

Other Local NGOs include Badban Welfar Organization, Roshani and Mashal Development Organization. Besides, there are more than 60 local development / welfare organizations and societies registered with Social Welfare Department. (Sources: Social Welfare Haripur, PHKN and SUNGI)


Government Structure / Set Up

The districts has one constituencies of national assembly i.e. NA-19, While it has four seats in provincial assembly i.e. PK-49 - PK-52. There are two tehsils viz. Haripur and Ghazi. In Haripur town and Kalabat town there are municipal committees. The district comprises 44 union councils, 137 village councils and 20 neighborhood councils.


It has been planned by the provincial government to establish an elected local government (Village councils, neighborhood councils, Tehsil councils and district council) but the plan has not been implement yet and at the moment there is no such set up that is why the district government / administration is run by government employees. Deputy Commissioner (DC) works as administrative / executive head of the district assisted by Assistant Commissioners (ACs) in all tehsils. Most of the government department exist in the districts, a brief description of major departments are as following;


Department

District Office

Head of the Office

Contacts

Agriculture Extension

Tehsil Road, Haripur

District Director

0995 614187


Agriculture Research

Near Ayub Medical Complex, Abbotabad

Director Research


0992 380873

Crop Reporting Services / Agriculture Statistics

Opposite Tehsil, Near Account Office, Haripur

Statistical Officer

0992 382388


DDMA

AC office, Civil Secretariat, Haripur /DO Office, KKH Haripur

Assistant Commissioner Haripur / District Disaster Management Officer

0995 610455

0995 613389




District Administration

Opposite TMA, KKH, Haripur

Deputy Commissioner

0995 613391

0995 613389



Local Government

Block A, Civil Secretariat, Haripur

Assistant Director

0995 616202

Executive District Officer, Agriculture

Tehsil Road, Haripur

Executive District Officer

0995 614187

Forest

Near Girls High School No. 2, Haripur

Divisional Forest Officer

0995 611846


Industrial / Societies Development

Near Sirikot Bus Stop, Haripur.

Industrial Development Officer

0995 614568


Social Welfare / Community Development

Block A, Civil Secretariat, Haripur

Community Development Officer

0995 616254

Irrigation Division

Near Hotel Alpine, Mandian Abbotabad

Divisional Executive Engineer

0992 931046

Irrigation Sub Division

Irrigation Colony, Sarai Salah, Haripur

Sub Divisional Officer

0995 313923

Livestock & Dairy Development

Opposite TMA, KKH, Haripur

District Livestock Officer

0995 610122

Public Health Engineering

Tehsil Road, Haripur

District Director

03333512524

Soil Conservation

Railway Station Road, Haripur

District Director

0301 5402952


Water Management

Opposite Clean CNG, Railway Station Road, Haripur

Director

0995 627012

Health




Executive District Officer

0995 610997

Finance & Planning

Block B, Civil Secretariat, Haripur

District Planning Officer

0995 615134

TMO Haripur

Opposite DC Office, KKH, Haripur

Tehsil Municipal Officer

0995 613478

Other departments in the district include Police, Excise, Works & Services, Laborer Welfare, Population Welfare, Pakistan Post and C&W etc. (Sources: Local Government and Visits to the departments)


PDMA /DDMA

District Disaster Management Authority (DDMA) is a district level setup of Provincial Disaster Management Authority (PDMA). Assistant commissioner Haripur is working as District Disaster Management Officer (DDMO). Other staff has a joint office with Public Safety Commission at Deputy Commissioner Office. They are mostly working on requests for compensation of any disaster. Application is submitted from an affected, after verification it is forwarded to PDMA for sanction, once sanctioned by PDMA the application is forwarded to accounts section for payment. The Staff has been trained by PDMA, in collaboration with development agencies working on DRR, on Community Based Disaster Risk Management / contingencies plans.


DDMO coordinate all kind of donor funded interventions in the district. They prepare contingency plans every year before monsoon and have a close collaboration with Pakistan Red Crescent Society. Meetings are mostly held on need base, while they have keep contact with meteorological department and early warning is usually communicated through phone to local police station and revenue officials based in the endangered localities. DDMO leads / monitor emergency activities. Deputy Commissioner of the district chairs coordination committee which implements district funds. DDMA office is also used as district control center and plays a role in issuance of NOC from PDMA and its verification / renewal. (Sources: DDMA Office)
Revenue Administration

The Revenue Administration is being headed by Assistant Commissioners. There are 83 Patwar Circles and 362 revenue villages and 2 Municipality charges in the District. Each Sub Division has Revenue set up comprising of Tehsildars and Naib Tehsildars who have a number of Girdawars under each. Each Girdawar looks-after the work of several Patwaris in his Circle. (Sources: Census 1998 & Primary data)



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