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After the Battle of Trenton, Stark retired in a huff from duty, angry at bureaucratic army decisions. Cavender returned to his land to resume clearing and also to help his neighbor Ramsey put the roof on his cabin. By early summer, Stark was persuaded to rejoin army forces, with the understanding that he himself was to be in full command of his troops. He put out a call for men to join him in the Grants area of New Hampshire, near the Vermont border. Every able bodied man in Society Land responded to his call. Cavender re-enlisted on July 12, 1777.

The British General Burgoyne ordered Hessian troops, assisted by Tories and Indians, to lead an expedition to Grants to obtain fresh supplies from the stores of horses, wagons, cattle and arms held there by the Colonists. During a steady rain, the Hessians took up a hilltop position. Stark countered the Hessian tactics by splitting forces, ordering one column to the north to attack from the rear, and the New Hampsiremen southward to attack from the left, while Stark would attack straight ahead on the right. The fighting men, who were wearing their hunting shirts and fur hats, were instructed to carry their rifles butt-up over their shoulders, Tory style. The ruse worked. They were able to infiltrate the enemy lines. The actual fighting started at 3:00 p.m. on August 16, 1777 and after two hours, Hessian forces were decimated. Prisoners and booty were being collected, and rum enjoyed, when British reinforcements arrived. The reinforcements were defeated in a second battle. Loot included hundreds of muskets and swords, brass cannons, and four ammunition wagons. In the aftermath, General Burgoyne said, "The Hampshire Grants...now abounds in the most active and rebellious race on the continent, and hangs like a gathering storm upon my left.

This became known as the Battle of Bennington, but in New Hampshire it is known as Stark's Battle. Cavender served two months in this tour, and then returned to his land.

In early summer of 1778, Cavender again enlisted, this time in Salem, Massachusetts, from where he marched to King's Ferry at Stony Point on the Hudson River, and on to Worcester and Springfield. For a portion of this enlistment he was stationed at Fishkill, but most of the time he was on the river. Just as the northern chain of waterways connecting Montreal and New York had been strategic to the war, so the Hudson River at the southern end of the chain was strategic. It connected Albany and New York City, and was considered to be the belt holding all the colonies together. In 1778, the principal responsibility of the militia stationed on the river was patrol duty between the three forts which had been built to keep the waterway open to the colonists. Stony Point was at the south end of the patrol, where King's Ferry was a major crossing. At the northern end, Fishkill was a supply depot and administrative center. West Point was at the mid-point. There were skirmishes along the river in 1778, but no major battle until 1779 when Stony Point became a battle site, and Cavender's six months enlistment was completed before this.

Many men who fought in the Revolution settled for one or perhaps two enlistments of eight months each. Cavender saw duty for twenty-four months, and we can ask ourselves why he felt so impelled. John Adams stated that the outcome of the Revolution was accomplished before the war began, in the minds and hearts of the pioneers who fought. Certainly even before the Revolution, Cavender had determined in his mind and heart to never again be mocked by subservience. As a pioneer he already lived close to death. He had the grit to fight. After twenty-four months of service, it would appear that in his mind and heart Cavender knew freedom, for he returned to his land, prepared to settle down, to create a farm and take on the responsibilities of a family man with a future. Though the war was not over for another year, he did not re-enlist.

When Cavender returned to Society Land around Christmas time, he boarded with James Ramsey and his wife Mary until he built his own cabin. Before starting on the cabin, he took the time to girdle a number of the virgin trees. To strip an area of bark around the circumference of the trunk was the quickest way to make a tree die and bring sunshine into the woods. Then Cavender broadcast spring rye seed, and scratched it in on the forest floor among the dying trees and the boulders. Only after this cash crop was planted did he prepare to build a cabin." 424

After the war was over, he married Eleanor Wilson (formerly "Eleanor Addison") of Lyndeboro ("Lyndoboro"?), New Hampshire, purchased with the continental money, many acres of land at 10 cents per acre in the town of Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, which is adjacent to Antrim, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, and, in company with a man named James Ramsey, made the first settlement in that part of the State. He subsequently filed a Revolutionary War Application for Pension S17875 for serving in the Continental Main and New Hampshire Line. Various Revolutionary War veterans filed affidavits supporting the statements of Charles Cavender. And, on October 23, 1832, his claim was allowed as Certificate No. 956.

He finally settled in Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, where he spent the remainder of his life on a farm and where he died May 6, 1833 as a quite wealthy landowner and is buried with his wife in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire.

Charles Cavender and Eleanor Cavender ("Elanor Cavender"?) apparently had seven children, 3 daughters and 4 sons, two of whom resided for a few years in New Hampshire. The children are listed as having been born in Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. However, as Greenfield was incorporated on June 15, 1791, then, technically, the first four children were born in Society Land, which is designated in the 1790 census as the home of the Cavenders. The 7 children of Charles Cavender and Eleanor Cavender were:

(1) Sarah Cavender born January 27, 1782 in Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, and married Elson Burnham ("Epps Burnham"? & "Epson Burnham"?) about 1806 in Concord, New Hampshire. Epps Burnham and Sarah Burnham lived and raised a large family in Antrim, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, afterwards moved, and Sarah Burnham died in Concord, New Hampshire on March 18, 1824. The date of birth of Sarah Cavender is verified by bible entries in the possession of her brother, William Charles Cavender, and were apparently entered on January 12, 1809 in Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. The 7 children of Epps Burnham and Sarah Burnham were:

Sarah Ann Burnham ("Sarah Burnham") believed to have been born in Antrim, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire;

Franklin Burnham believed to have been born in Antrim, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire;

Charles Burnham believed to have been born in Antrim, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire; Epps Burnham believed to have been born in Antrim, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire;

Nathanial Burnham ("Nathaniel Burnham"?) believed to have been born in Antrim, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire;

Emily Jane Burnham ("Emily Burnham") believed to have been born in Antrim, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire; and,

Mary E. Burnham ("Mary Burnham") believed to have been born in Antrim, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire;

(2) Mary Cavender ("Polly Cavender", "Mary Jane Cavender"?, “M.J. Cavender”? & "Elizabeth Cavender"?) born August 21, 1783 in Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, married Captain Abraham Holmes in Peterboro, New Hampshire, and died on March 18, 1824 at the age of 41. The date of birth of Mary Cavender is verified by bible entries in the possession of her brother, William Charles Cavender, and were apparently entered on January 12, 1809 in Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. The 4 children of Abraham Holmes and Mary Holmes were:



Eleanor Holmes;

Grace Holmes;

James Holmes; and,

Mary Holmes;

(3) James Charles Cavender ("James Cavender", “J.C. Cavender” & “James C. Cavender”) born on May 15, 1786 in Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, moved to Hancock, New Hampshire about 1810 and lived on the Cavender Road by the river, married Rachel Ann Butler (“Rachel Jane Butler”, "Rachel Butler" & "Rachael Butler"?) on November 27, 1811 in either Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire or in Hancock, New Hampshire424, at one time lived on a farm that his father gave to him, moved to Union County, Ohio about 1844-1846 at the age of about 58-60, was married to Rachel Butler for 72 years, and he died on August 16, 1883 in North Lewisburg, Allen Township, Union County, Ohio at the age of 96 years, 3 months and 1 day. The date of birth of James Charles Cavender (“James C. Cavender”) is verified by bible entries in the possession of his brother, William Charles Cavender (“William C. Cavender”), and were apparently entered on January 12, 1809 in Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. Rachel Butler was born on either July 4, 1789 or on July 30, 1788 in Lyndeboro, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, was the daughter of Jonathan Butler and Lois Rachel Kidder ("Lois Kidder"), and died on June 12, 1884 in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio at the age of 96 years, 11 months and 14 days. On her death certificate, her name was listed as Rachel Jane Cavender. It is believed that James and Rachael are buried in two unmarked graves next to the Bales’ graves in Broderick Cemetery in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio.

According to "The History of Hancock, New Hampshire" by W.W. Hayward, James Charles Cavender removed to Hancock, New Hampshire about 1810 and resided in the part of the town at the place marked "E. Pearsons", in 1831 he moved to Lyndeboro ("Lyndoboro"?), in 1837 he moved to Dublin, New Hampshire, in 1839 he moved to Peterboro, New Hampshire, in 1842 he moved to Dublin, New Hampshire again. In 1844 he moved to North Lewisburg, Allen Township, Union County, Ohio, where they lived on the William Bales farm and where he died, and at which time he and Rachel were considered to be the oldest couple in Union County, Ohio. However, on January 28, 1850, Rachel Cavender wrote a letter to her son David Cavender and his wife Jane Cavender who were still living in Peterboro, New Hampshire. At that time she told her son to be sure to address the letter to Coberley's Post Office in Ohio, which is near North Lewisburg in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio and no longer exists.384

The above William Bales apparently was the son-in-law of James Cavender, having married his daughter, Sarah Burnham Cavender ("Sarah Cavender"), and it is said that the two Cavender and Bales families both moved together from New Hampshire to Ohio at the same time.384 James Cavender and Rachel Cavender had the following nine children: 383

(i) Annis Cavender, born on December 20, 1813 in Hancock, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, married Capt. Joseph Symonds, Jr. (“Joseph Simonds”) on March 19, 1832 in New Hampshire. FHL Number 1001306 Joseph Symonds was a native of New Hampshire and is where they resided most of their lives. She died on August 30, 1843 at the age of 31, and is buried in the Pineridge Cemetery in Hancock, New Hampshire. Joseph Symonds was born on October 31, 1801 in New Hampshire, and died on October 7, 1849. It is also stated that Annis Cavender married a Mrs. Syword? who was the mother of Mrs. George Holt of Greenfield, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire;

(ii) Abraham Holmes Cavender ("Abram H. Cavender", "Abram Holmes Cavender", "Abram Cavender" & "Abraham Cavender"), born on July 21, 1814 in Hancock, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, married Elvira Hopkins (“Elvirah Hopkins”) in New Hampshire and whose great great grandfather Jonathan Butler ("Jonathon Butler") fought in the battles of Bunker Hill, Trenton and Princeton. In 1843 they moved to Logan County, Ohio and about 1850, they moved to St. Paul, Minnesota. Abraham Cavender and Elvira Cavender had a son named:



Charles Addison Cavender ("Charles Cavender" & “Charles A. Cavender”) born in Marysville, Ohio on July 14, 1846, was educated in St. Paul, Minnesota, married Jennie Nixon in 1869, later moved to Tacoma, Washington, and died at the age of 25 in New Hampshire.98 Charles Cavender and Jennie Cavender had a daughter named:

Jessie Cavender who was born in St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota, and married Fredrick Mark Gribble ("Fredrick Gribble"). (Note the DAR application of Jessie Cavender Gribble364 where she states that she was the daughter of Charles Addison Cavender and Jennie Nixon Cavender, and that her father, Charles Addison Cavender, was the son of Abram H. Cavender and Elvira Hopkins. The applicant further states that her great great grandfather, Charles Cavender, was born in Ireland in 1736 and that he removed from Ireland to Newfoundland about 1755. However, in the History of Hancock, New Hampshire, it is stated that the above Charles Cavender came from Ireland to Newfoundland about 1775 at the age of 19; thus, he would have been born about 1756 contra 1736);

(iii) Jonathan Butler Cavender ("Jonathan Cavender"), born March 22, 1816 in Hancock, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, never married, and died about 1858 in Kentucky at the age of 42 years;

(iv) Sarah Burnham Cavender ("Sarah Cavender") born March 19, 1818 in Hancock, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, married Walter William Bales ("William Bales" & "Walter Bales") on February 1, 1838 in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, later moved to North Lewisburg, Allen Township, Union County, Ohio, was a member of the Baptist Church, lived for a while in North Lewisburg, Allen Township, Union County, Ohio, and later moved to Nixon Township, Dewitt County, Illinois where she died on died March 10, 1856. Apparently Sarah Cavender has a relative named Catherine Elvessie Isheep Fackham ("Catherine Fackham" & "Catherine Isheep") according to an IGI fiche in the files in London, England. William Bales was born January 24, 1809 in Wilton, Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, was the son of William L. Bales ("William Bales") born March 13, 1784 and Chloe Halt born August 4, 1784, both of Vermont, and died on October 4, 1876 at the age of 92 years. The grandfather of William Walter Bales, named William L. Bales ("William Bales"), was a soldier under General George Washington while his father fought on the side of Great Britain. William L. Bales came to Union County, Ohio in 1840 and settled in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio where he died October 4, 1876 at the age of 92.

In the fall of 1838, William Walter Bales moved westward and first settled near Newton, Union County, Ohio and in the following year settled in North Lewisburg in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio. In 1857, he purchased from William Jenkins and his wife, 290 acres of land in Section 21 and Section 28. Later, the north 80 acres of the 290 tract was purchased by David M. Cavender ("David Cavender"), a brother-in-law of Walter Bales and also several of the Bales family settled on this land. However, a daughter and her husband lived for a while on her father's original tract, what is now known as the "C.C. Bales Estate", being named after her brother Clifford C. Bales, but later getting the "Kansas fever", moved on West. Walter Bales, the son of William Bales lived on the original tract for ten years and then sold his farm to John Crisman, a great-grandfather of Loyd Shinneman. The farm is now owned by Mrs. Bessie Swigart of Clinton.

On August 4, 1862, William Bales was then living in North Lewisburg, Champaign County, Ohio and wrote the following letter to his brother-in-law, James Moore Cavender:

"Dear brother-in-law, we received your letter Saturday last. It rains today so I will answer it. We are all well at this time. Wheat all stacked, about 400 bushels. It is very good. Corn looks well. ------------ War is all the talk. People have got sick of it. Volunteers are hard to get. Our Township is offering $100 bounty. They are enambling to draft. Our boys are enrolled, but I don't mean they should go. I had rather they would run away. A lot of soldiers deserted and came home here. They have taken them to Columbus and put them in confinement. I have given up going West and East this season on the account of the War. Would it be safe for one of the boys to come to you to clear a draft? We don't intend to have anything to do with the war. It is all to do for nothing. The Government is gone and it is no use for any one to jepordize his life for not going, but a nigger farce is I have done making calculation for improvements until this war is reconciled on some basis. I am of the impression that it will involve us in a war with all Europe before it is over. If it does, esclate through the free States will suffer the less a man has the better. I am puzeled to know what course to take in prevent affairs. Everything is in a percarious condition. I am anxious to sell all out. I have been offered my price. If the man can sell his farm. He thinks he can but I am inclined to think he can't. He is a stock dealer and his farm is a grain farm. He lives out by West Liberty. Money won't be good for anything. Four years from now. That is such money as we shall have. So that a man better have land than poor money. No word from any of the Gallations don't know whether they cave come to war or not. If it was not for the war, I would make calculations to come out and stay with you next summer but as it, can't tell. If you think it would be safe for one of the boys to come, write that son don't feel very well and need some help. There is a hatred growing up between the Democrats and Abolition politions that will make trouble yet. The Abolition feel called over them proven success in emancipation affairs. The war lasted longer than they expected. They supposed 90 days was a plenty, but instead of that they are forced to acknowledge that the Democrats prophecy right concerning their course. The Democrats charge the Abolition with they cause of the war and they charge the Democrats with doing so it ever with hard feelings."384

William Walter Bales and Sarah Bales had 10 children, 9 of which were:



Burnham E. T. Bales ("Burnham Bales");

William W. Bales ("William Walter Bales"? & "William Bales") born about 1840 in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio and married Jenny Dunn;

Walter W. Bales ("Walter Bales") born about 1841 in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio and married Victoria Inskup;

Clifford Charles Bales ("C.C. Bales", "Clifford Bales" & "Charles Bales") born about 1843 in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio, first married a Jane Allen, later married Amelia Abigal McGinnis ("Amelia McGinnis" & "Abigail McGinnis"?) in October 1870, and following the death of Amelia Bales, he married Marinda Jane Highland ("Marinda Highland") in Kentucky on October 20, 1881. Clifford Bales (with or without Jane Bales) drove through with team and wagon from "their" Ohio home to the farm located on his father's original tract in Nixon Township, Dewitt County, Illinois and which was previously vacated by his sister in 1868. From his diary, he wrote that he left on March 17, 1868 but, failing to write each day, it is unknown as to the number of days it took to make the trip. He told of camping and buying feed wherever he stopped. To Clifford Bales and Amelia Bales were 5 children. The first was a baby girl who died at the age of 3 months. Her mother died shortly there afterwards, thus leaving only the father with 3 boys and one girl. The mother died the day after the girl was 3 years old. With the help of his in-laws, Clifford Bales managed for a year and then remarried. It was an unusual courtship. One Sunday while at his in-laws, he was looking at Mrs. McGinnis' album and was attracted to the picture of a young woman. He inquired as to who she was. Mrs. McGinnis said it was a distant cousin living in her native state of Kentucky and named for her. She offered to write a letter of introduction which she did and after a short correspondence, arrangements were made for him to make the trip to Kentucky. On October 20, 1881, Clifford Bales married Marinda Jane Highland ("Marinda Highland") and left for his parents home in Ohio where she could meet his mother, grandparents and other relatives. They then came to Weldon where they were met by a cousin, Frank Cavender. Awaiting at the farm were 4 children, the oldest being 10 years of age. When the 4 children were grown, Clifford Bales and Marinda Bales took a 6 year old niece and later a 2 year old granddaughter. Clifford Bales and Marinda left the farm in September 1919 and moved to Weldon, Nixon Township, Dewitt County, Illinois to live. Clifford Bales had spent more than 50 years on that farm. He adjusted to town life, but only lived a year and a few months. His farm apparently is still known as the C.C. Bales Estate416;

Mary M. Bales ("Mary Bales" & "Elizabeth Bales"?) born about 1845 in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio and married Liver Carter;

Rosanna G. Bales ("Rosa Bales" & "Rosanna Bales") born about 1849 in Allen Township, Union County, Ohio and married Oliver Inskup; and,

Sarah Anna Bales ("Sarah Bales") born about 1855 in North Lewisburg, Allen Township, Union County, Ohio, married Charles Whitson Brodrick ("Charles Brodrick") November 28, 1879, and died July 17, 1902 in Woodstock in Champaign County, Ohio. Charles Brodrick was born May 7, 1852 in Allen Township in Union County, Ohio and died December 5, 1926 in Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska. Charles Brodrick and Sarah Brodrick had a son named:

David Paul Brodrick ("David Brodrick") who was born August 27, 1887 in Cable, Champaign County, Ohio, married Clarice Fay Whitlock ("Clarice Whitlock") March 19, 1911, and died October 16, 1936 in Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska. Clarice Whitlock was born September 16, 1892 in Franklin, in Morgan County, Illinois and died July 10, 1965 in Durate in Los Angeles, California. David Brodrick and Clarice Brodrick had a daughter named:

Faye Estelle Brodrick ("Fay Brodrick") born April 8, 1913 in Clay County, Nebraska, and married Burton Morgan Hanson ("Burton Hanson") June 10, 1950;

Frank Bales; and,

Rachel R. Bales;

(v) Charles Addison Cavender ("Charles Cavender" & “Charles A. Cavender”) who was born on November 25, 1819 in Hancock, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, never married, and died about 1844 in New Hampshire at the age of 25;

(vi) Mary Holmes Cavender ("Mary Cavender" & “Mary H. Cavender”), born January 12, 1822424 (some say July 8, 1824386) in Hancock, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, married Paul Whittemore ("Paul Whitmore"?) and both she and her husband died in New Hampshire;

(vii) Epps Burnham Cavender ("Epps Cavender", “Epps B. Cavender” & “E.B. Cavender”), born in Hancock, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire on July 8, 1824, married Harriet Laws in New Hampshire, resided on the William Dennis place in New Hampshire, and had a son named:



Charles S. Cavender ("Charles Cavender", “C.S. Cavender” & “Charles Samuel Cavender”?) who was born March 27, 1851;

(viii) Rachel B. Cavender ("Rachal Cavender", “R.B. Cavender” & “Rachel Cavender”) born May 26, 1826 in Hancock, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, married Joseph Willard Powers ("Joseph Powers") on April 27, 1848 in New Hampshire, and died in October 11, 1849 in New Hampshire; and,


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