Encyclopedia



Download 8.16 Mb.
Page168/224
Date18.10.2016
Size8.16 Mb.
1   ...   164   165   166   167   168   169   170   171   ...   224

The basis of establishing his date of birth is the fact that he was bound out to Danll Occanny (“Daniel Occanny”?) of Westmoreland County, Virginia, and on January 31, 1699, he was adjudged by the Court in Westmoreland County, Virginia to then be 17 years of age and was ordered to serve according to law.

On November 19, 1709, Francis Cavenaugh ("Francis Cavender"?), a Planter in the Parish of North Farnham Parish in the County of Richmond, Virginia, purchased 100 acres of land under the ancient system known as "lease and release" from apparently his father-in-law John Cralle (actually, "John Crawly" or “John Crawley”), a Gentleman was then living in Northumberland County, Virginia. His wife was Ann Cralle.

On March 8, 1715, the lawsuit previously brought by Francis Caverner ("Francis Cavender"?) in the Court of Richmond County, Virginia against William Wyatt was dismissed as Francis Cavener was not prosecuting. Richmond Cnty Va Order Bk 6, p. 426

On February 6, 1717, two separate cases brought by Frances Caverner ("Francis Caverner" & "Francis Cavender"?) in the Court of Richmond County, Virginia against Henry Boren and against Thomas Yeats ("Thomas Yates"?) were both dismissed as the plaintiff was not prosecuting.Richmond Cnty Va Order Bk 7, p. 234

On September 5, 1717, Marmaduke Beckwith, assignee of William Croucher brought suit in county court of Richmond County, Virginia against Francis Caverner (“Francis Cavender”) which was later dismissed. In the case of Francis Caverner ("Francis Cavender"?) against Henry Boren which was brought in the Court of Richmond County, Virginia for 330 pounds of tobacco, the defendant not appearing so judgment was granted against the sheriff for the said sum unless said Henry Boren is at the next court. Richmond Cnty Va Order Bk 7, p. 205

On September 5, 1717, in the case of Francis Caverner ("Francis Cavender"?) against Thomas Yeats ("Thomas Yates"?) which was brought in the Court of Richmond County, Virginia for 540 pounds of tobacco, the defendant not appearing so judgment was granted against the sheriff for the said sum unless said Thomas Yeats is at the next court. Richmond Cnty Va Order Bk 7, p. 205

On February 26, 1719, Joan Caverner (“Johann Cavenaugh”?, “Johanna Cavenough”?, "Joan Cavender"?, “Joan Cavender”? & “Johanna Cavender”?), wife of Francis Caverner (“Francis Cavenaugh”, “Francis Cavenough”, & "Francis Cavender"?) of Richmond County, Virginia, gave power of attorney to "her friend" Charles Lewis (believed to be her brother) to acknowledge the deed and the release of her dower rights with respect to the sale (or gift) by her husband Francis Caverner to James Skelley ("James Kelley"? & "James Kelly"?) and Elizabeth Skelley ("Elizabeth Kelley"?) of 100 acres of land. The power of attorney was witnessed by Samuel Samford (“Samuel Sanford”? & “Samuel Sanfort”?) and Anthony Dowlin ("Anthony Dowlen"). There probably is some family connection between the above Charles Lewis above and the particular James Lewis who purchased the right of Hugh Caviner’s (Hugh Caverner”, “Hugh Cavenough”? & "Hugh Cavender"?) to claim 100 acres of land on April 10, 1671 for transporting himself into St. Mary’s County, Maryland 393 & Richmond Cnty Va Deed Bk 7, p. 486

On March 3, 1719, Francis Caverner (“Francis Cavenaugh”, & "Francis Cavender"?) purchased from Charles Lewis for 5,000 pounds of tobacco 200 acres of land located in Farnum Parish ("North Farnham Parish"?) of Richmond County, Virginia on the branches of Totaskey Creek (“Totuskey Creek”?) adjacent to the lands of William Lambert, Charles Lund, Colonel John Tarpley and William Hamock (“William Hammock”?). Witnesses were John Tarpley and John Tarpley, Jr. Mary Lewis, wife of Charles Lewis relinquished her right of dower which was witnessed by Samuel Samford and Anthony Dowlin. Note: It appears that this is the very same tract of land which was subsequently sold on October 11, 1743 by John Cavenaugh to Robert Hamock (“Robert Hammock”?) and who is believed to be the son of Francis Caverner. It is also to be noted that, as Francis Caverner (“Francis Cavender”) was born about 1683, and thus would have been about 36 years old in 1719 and is barely old enough to have a married daughter by the end of 1719, but Elizabeth Kelley could have been about 16-17 years old at the time. 393 & 441

On January 3, 1721, Daniel Jones, servant to Francis Caverner (“Francis Cavender”?), was this day presented to the court for inspection into his age was adjudged 13 years old and ordered that he serve his said Master or his assigns according to law.441

On April 2, 1722, Johanah Caverner (“Johannah Cavender”?,“Joanna Cavender"? & "Joan Cavender), “relick” (i.e., widow) of Francis Caverner ("Francis Cavener"?, "Francis Cavner"?, "Francis Cavenor"?, "Francis Cavornor"? & "Francis Cavender"?), who was then deceased, went into Court in Richmond County, Virginia, and made oath that the said Francis Caverner departed this life without making any will so far as she knows or believes. She was granted the right to administer the estate of her deceased husband. The inventory of the estate was conducted by Alexander Clark, William Hammock and John Hughlett and his estate included one servant boy by the name of Gervis who was then age 7. Richmond Cnty Va Order Bk 9, p. 38

On March 1, 1726, James Kelley ("James Kelly"?) of Farnum Parish ("North Farnham Parish") of Richmond County, Virginia gave a life estate to Edward Anderson and Margaret Anderson a life estate with respect to fifty acres situated in Farnum Parish ("North Farnham Parish") of Richmond County, Virginia and on the branches of Totuskey Creek being part of a parcel of land that Francis Caverner("Francis Cavenor"?, "Francis Caverner"?, "Francis Cavernor" & "Francis Cavender"?) gave a life estate to James Kelley ("James Kelly"?), and which property was adjacent to a piece of land belonging to Captain John Tarpley At the death of James Kelley, the land was to be returned to the heirs of Francis Caverner. 393

Francis Cavender and Johanah Cavender (“Joanna Cavender”?) had a son named:

JOHN CAVENDER. On May 5, 1737, Hugh Lambert, guardian of the minor John Caverner (“John Cavender”), filed a final accounting and for his caring for the 150 acre farm which John Caverner inherited from his father, Francis Cavender.



In May 1740, the account of the estate of John Caverner (“John Cavender”) was recorded by Hugh Lambert in the county court of Richmond County, Virginia for the “quit rents” he had received as guardian on 100 acres of land owned by minor John Cavender for the years 1737-1739. 393

On April 11, 1741, William Lambert of Farnham Parish ("North Farnham Parish"?), Richmond County, Virginia sold to Hugh Lambert of the same Parish and County, for 1400 pounds of tobacco, a certain tract of land estimated to be 70 acres, being on the Northeast side of Totuskey Creek ("Toteskey Creek", “Totsky Creek”? & “Totesky Creek”?) in Farnham Parish and bounded by the land of (1) John Caruley (“John Crawly”? & “John Crawley”?), formerly owned by Denis Swillivant (“Dennis Sullivant”? & “Dennis Swillivant”?);(2) the land then owned by John Caverner (“John Cavender”) and formerly owned by Edward Lewis, deceased; (3) the land then owned by Secretary John Carter and formerly owned by Colonel Will; and (4) the land then owned by the said Hugh Lambert. The tract is part of 300 acres purchased from Daniel Swillivant by William Lambert, deceased, father of the aforesaid William Lambert and given to him by the will of his said father, deceased. Signed by William Lambert and witnessed by W. Hartly (“W. H. Hartley”), Robert Hamack (“Robert Hammock”? & “Robert Hamock”?) by his mark, and was recorded on August 3, 1841.441

On October 11, 1743, John Elmore of Richmond County, Virginia sold to Edward Morris land located on Totuskey Creek in Richmond County, Virginia adjacent to the land of John Elmore ("John Ellmore"?) and on the south side of "Drinking Swamp", which apparently was the land owned by Francis Caverner, and lands owned by Travers Tarpley and Captain John Smith. The Indenture was witnessed by Benedict Hamock, Thomas Stanford and Abraham Dodson. This deed places the land of John Cavinder (“John Cavender”), son of Francis Cavinder (“Francis Cavender”) on Drinking Swamp in Richmond County, Virginia not far from the intersection with Westmoreland County, Virginia, Richmond County, Virginia, and Northumberland County, Virginia. 393

Also on October 10, 1743, John Cavenaugh ("John Caverner" & “John Cavender”?) of the North Farnham Parish of the county of Richmond, Virginia sold to Robert Hamock (“Robert Hammock”?) of the same county for the sum of 6,000 pounds of tobacco 200 acres of land situated in the same parish and county and which land is bounded by the lands of William Lambart (“William Lambert”?), or formerly by so-called Charles Lund, Colonel John Tarpley, William Hamoch (“William Hamock”? & “William Hammock”?) deceased, and Clark’s line, beginning at a marked hickory near a path, and running from there North thirty-seven degrees East 130 poles to a marked hickory, corner to aforesaid William Lambert, thence along another of his South fifty-one degrees East 120 poles, thence along Clarkes line South fifty-nine degrees East 30 poles to a corner red oak, thence East by North 46 poles to John Tarpley line, thence along John Tarpley line South two degrees West 213 poles to a white oak, thence North fifty-one degrees West 300 poles to the beginning. The Indenture was witnessed by Charles Jones, John Hammock (“John Hamock”?), John Elmore (“James Elmore”?) by his mark, and Robert A. Sladder ("Robert Sladder" & "Robert Madder"), and the bond of John Cavender was proven by the oaths of John Hammock, John Elmore and Robert Sladder.393, 441 & DB10,pg172-175

It is to be noted that the above parcel of land is the exact parcel of land which was was purchased by Francis Caverner (“Francis Cavenough”? & “Francis Cavender”?) from Charles Lewis on either March 3, 1719 or on March 3, 1720 and who is believed to be the father of the above John Cavenouth ("John Caverner"? & "John Cavender"?). Of further significance, some of the Hammock or Hamock families later likewise moved to Amelia County, Virginia, and further, the property of a James Elmore was located next to the land owned by the Cavenders ("Hugh Cavender"?) in Charlotte County, Virginia in the 1780's. 393 & 441 It is also to be noted that a James Elmore was a minister who married widow Polly Hamlett on October 13, 1803 in Charlotte County, Virginia.

In 1744, Jno Cavenor ("Jno Cavender"? & "John Cavender"?) was on the rental rolls in Richmond County, Virginia in 1744 and he apparently received payment for rent from a Hammock (“John Hammock”?) for 100 acres. 393 & 418

On October 15, 1747, John Cavender, and others, were listed as debtors of the estate of William Burston ("William Bornston") in Fairfax County, Virginia by the Administrator, Henry Trenn. It is to be noted that the John Cavender who was the son of Francis Cavender of Richmond County, Virginia is now of record in Fairfax County, Virginia. 393

On May 7, 1755, John Cavener ("John Cavenor"? &"John Cavender"?) of Fairfax County, Virginia, executed his Last Will and Testament in Fairfax County, Virginia in which he left to Elenor Barnsby("Eleanor Barnsby", "Eleanor Barnsby" & "Elinor Barnsby"?) all his personal estate and appointed her as the Executrix. Witnessed by William Grove, George Simpson and Peter Smith, Jr. He apparently died in Fairfax County prior to May 20, 1755 as it was on that date Eleanor Barnsby filed an affidavit in court requesting that the above will of John Cavender be probated. The will was "proved" on May 30, 1755. An appraisal of the estate of John Cavender was filed on June 17, 1755 by James Ingoe Dozier (“James Dozier”), Richard Brown and George Landman. It is possible that Elinor Barnsby was the aunt of the deceased John Cavender and that she was the person who had a mulatto child earlier, had subsequently married and moved to Fairfax County, Virginia.

The above John Cavender could not have been the John Jay Cavender who witnessed the execution of a deed on March 22, 1775 for the sale by Hugh Cavender (“John Hugh Cavender”?) of Reighley Parish ("Raleigh Parish"), Amelia County, Virginia of 6.75 acres of land to John Green, because the above John Cavender was deceased at that particular point in time.Will Bk. B1, pp 87, 4, 168 & 393

(v) DAVID CAVENAH/DAVID CAVENDER born about 1683-1684, was first bound out to Thomas Baker, and later to Thomas Gaskins, of Northumberland County, Virginia, and subsequently married a Hannah (“Hannah Cavenah” & “Hannah Cavender”?).

The above date of birth of David Cavenah is based on the fact that, on November 16, 1698, David Cavenah ("David Cavender"?), then a servant to Thomas Baker (another entry says he was a servant to Thomas Gaskins), was adjudged by the County Court of Northumberland County, Virginia to then be 14 years of age and was ordered to serve as an indentured servant according to law, and he apparently died about 1733-1734 at the age of about 49-51 years.Records of Indentured Servants, etc. of Northumberland Cnty Va, p177, document 1039

On October 3, 1722, Stephen Wells ("Steven Wells"), planter of Sittenbourn Parish, Richmond County, Virginia and his wife, Elizabeth Wells, and Francis Settle, eldest son of said Elizabeth Wells, conveyed to David CAVENDER (i.e., not spelled “Cavenah”) of Cople Parish in Westmoreland County, Virginia, planter, for 3,000 pounds of tobacco, 50 acres of land now in the tenure of Rice Cookman and located in North Farnum Parish (“North Farnham Parish”), Richmond County, Virginia which was situated adjacent to the lands of Moore Fauntleroy, Thomas Williams, Katherin Deek (“Katherine Deek”) and Mary Deek, daughters of Joseph Deek, deceased, and Thomas Beal. It is to be noted that the above Stephen Wells apparently is the same person who filed an inventory of the estate of Thomas Caverner (“Thomas Cavender”) on May 6, 1719 in Richmond County, Virginia, and who is believed to be the brother of the above David Cavender.

On September 7, 1726, a hearing was held in the county court of Richmond County, Virginia regarding an action for slander filed by David Cavinder (“David Cavender”?) against Edward Kelly (“Edward Kelley”?) and his wife, Mary Kelly (“Mary Kelley”?). Apparently, Edward Kelly and Margaret Kelley accused David Cavinder of stealing tobacco out of the tobacco house of Colonel Tayloe. As the defendant, Edward Kelly, did not appear in court, a default judgement of 20 pounds? sterling was awarded to David Cavinder against said defendants and their security and George Wharton. Court costs would also be awarded if the Defendants did not appear and answer in the next session of the Court. However, on October 5, 1727, a jury trial found the defendants not guilty and the plaintiff was ordered to pay costs, et. 393, 441 & Bk9,pg308

In a law suit filed on March 5, 1727, in the Court of Richmond County, Virginia by David Cavinder (“David Cavender”?) against William Walker, judgment on the record was awarded to said David Cavender in the amount of two hundred and fifty pounds of tobacco against the said William Walker and his security, Caron Forannon (“Caron Porannon”?) as William Walker apparently did not appear to defend the action at the June 1727 session. Court costs were also awarded David Cavinder if William Walker did not appear at the next session of the Court to defend himself. 441 & Bk9,pg343

On July 5, 1727, Thomas Ossborne (“Thomas Osborne”?), an under-sheriff of Richmond County, Virginia filed a complaint in the Court that David Cavinder (“David Cavender”?) and his wife Hannah Cavinder (“Hannah Cavender”?) drew a sword against him and swore that they would run him through the body, by which means Elizabeth Brooks, then a prisoner in his custody, made her escape. It was therefore ordered that the sheriff take them into custody and them safely kept, till they enter into bond with good and sufficient security for their appearance at next court to answer the said complaint. The order that they be taken into custody discontinued on July 4, 1728. 393, 441 & Bk9,pg363

On April 3, 1728, David Cavinder ("David Cavender") and Thomas Williams, planters, of North Farnham Parish of Richmond County, Virginia, sold to Moore Fantleroy (“Moore Fauntleroy”) of the same Parish and County for the sum of two thousand seven hundred pounds of good tobacco payable to David Cavinder, and five shillings payable to Thomas Williams a parcel of land situated in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia approximately 50 acres of land, which land was then in the tenure of David Cavinder and which land was devised by Rice Williams (father of said Thomas Williams) in and by his Last Will and Testament in writing unto his daughter, Elizabeth Williams, and her heirs (after the death of her mother) which Elizabeth Williams (“Elizabeth Wells”) wife of Stephen Wells, together with Stephen Wells, her husband, and Francis Settle, her eldest son by a former husband by deed bearing date of October 3, 1722 sold by them David Cavender, which land is abutting the lands of Thomas Williams, Katherine Deek and Mary Deek, daughters of Joseph Deek, deceased, Captain Thomas Beale, and the land of said Moore Fantleroy (“Moore Fauntleroy”?), late in the possession of Edward Bryant. 393,441, Richmond Cnty, Va Deed Bk 8, p 441 & Bk9 p565 From the foregoing, it can be concluded that David Cavinder ("David Cavender") married Elizabeth Williams, the daughter of Rice Williams and sister of Thomas Williams. It is also to be noted that Ellinor Caverner (“Elinor Caverner”, “Ellinor Cavender”? & “Elinor Cavender”), was the named woman servant belonging to Mr. Moore Fartleroy ("Moore Fauntleroy" & "Moore Fantleroy") and who was previously presented to a grand jury in the Court of Richmond County, Virginia for having a bastard child believed to be mulatto.

On May 3, 1732, David Caverner (“David Cavenner” & "David Cavender"?) of North Farnham Parish (“Northfarnham Parish”), Richmond County, Virginia was ordered by the Court of Richmond County, Virginia to answer a presentment of the Grand Jury against him for harboring and receiving lewd and desolate persons, and for keeping a disorderly house on April 10 last past by information of Collo. John Tayloe (“John Taylor”?). Case was continued until it was dismissed on July 3, 1733. 393 & Richmond Cnty, Va Order Bk9 p 646

On either March 3, 1733 or on March 3, 1734, the county court of Richmond County, Virginia dismissed the Order of Attachment filed by Edward Anderson against the estate of David Cavanough (“David Cavender”). As there is no further records of David Cavender nor his wife Hannah Cavender, then he must have just deceased.393

On April 10, 1739, the Last Will and Testament of Moore Fountleroy was probated in Lunenbury Parish of Richmond County, Virginia and in which he devised land that he had previously purchased from David CAVENDER (actual spelling), i.e., not Cavenner, etc. pp80, Wills of Richmond Cnty VA, 1699-1800 by Rbt. K. Headley, Jr.1983

(vi) DANIEL CAVENNER (“David Cavenah” & “Daniel Cavender”?) born about 1687-1688, was bound out to Edgecomb Suggett in Richmond County, Virginia, and died about 1718 at the age of about 30 years. An inventory of his estate was filed in Richmond County, Virginia on May 6, 1719 which is the very same date that the inventory of the estate of Thomas Caverner was filed in Richmond County, Virginia and who is believed to be his brother.

The basis of establishing his date of birth is based on the fact that, on June 7, 1699, while a servant to Edgecomb Suggett, he was adjudged by the Court of Richmond County, Virginia to then be 11 years of age and ordered to serve as an indentured servant according to law.Sam & Ruth Sparacio ab Richmond Cnty, Va Order Bk, 1694-1699, p 399

On April 1, 1713, the lawsuit previously brought by Daniel Caverner ("Daniel Cavender"?) in the Court of Richmond County, Virginia against Colonel Samuel Peachey for 500 pounds of tobacco was dismissed as the plaintiff was not prosecuting. However, on August 7, 1713, the court of Richmond County, Virginia awarded a judgment of tobacco to Daniel Caverner ("Daniel Cavender"?) against the estate of Colonel Samuel Peachey.Richmond Cnty Va Order Bk 6, pgs 85 & 136

On June 1, 1715, Daniel Caverner ("Daniel Cavender") was summoned to the Court of Richmond County, Virginia to answer a charge of not making corn this year. The suit was later dismissed by the King’s attorney. Apparently every colonist was required to grow enough corn to meet their own needs. If they did not provide their own corn, they were apt to become a burden upon the County, and that was frowned upon, particularly if that particular person was considered to be able-bodied.Richmond Cnty Va Order Bk 6, p. 285 & 393

On August 2, 1716, Daniel Cavener ("Daniel Cavender"?) attended court in Court of Richmond County, Virginia for 4 days as a witness for Edgecomb Suggett in his suit against Henry Woodcock, and it was ordered that Daniel Cavener was to be paid for his attendance by Edgecomb Suggett. Richmond Cnty Va Order Bk 7, p. 35

On November 6, 1718, an appraisal of the estate of Daniel Caverner ("Daniel Cavenner"? "Daniel Caverner"?, "Daniel Cavener"?, "Daniel Cavener", "Daniel Cavenough"? & "Daniel Cavender"?) was filed in Richmond County, Virginia by Patrick Brady and Partick Dunn, with bond by Hugh Harris. According to the Richmond County Court Order Book dated November 6, 1718: "Patrick Brady and Patrick Dunn came into Court and made oath Daniel Caverner departed this life without making any Will. Bond of Patrick Brady and Patrick Dunn, Bondsman Hugh Harris.” Appraisers were Robert Baylis ("Robert Bayless"?), Giles Webb, Thomas Nash and Hugh Harris. 1 , 115, 168 & 393 Of some possible significance is the fact that Partick Dunn appears in the will of John Shordan (“John Sherdon”, "John Shordon"? & "John Sheridan"?) which was probated in Lunenburg Parish, Richmond County, Virginia on June 1, 1709 and in which Elin Eaches (also “Eleanor Eroche”, “Elin Eroche”, “Elinor Eroche”, “Elinor Eaches” & “Eliner Eaches”) was the named Executrix, and in which her son, Daniel Cavenner (“Daniel Caverner”?, “Daniel Cavener”?, "Daniel Cavener", “Daniel Cavenough”? & “Daniel Cavender”?), was to receive either a "hat of a half-crown price" or “half of a half-crown piece”, and she and her son John ("John Caverner"?, "John Cavener"?, John Cavenough"? & "John Cavender"?) were to receive the remainder of his estate. 393 & Richmond Cnty, Va Will Bk 1, p.128-129

On May 6, 1719, a further appraisal and inventory of the estate of Daniel Caverner (“David Caverner”, "Daniel Cavender"? & “David Cavender”?) of Richmond County, Virginia was made per court order dated November 6, 1718. The appraisal was made by Giles Webb, Thomas Nash and Hugh Harris and the inventory included a 2 year old heifer, 1 sow, 3 shoates and a few odds and ends, suggesting that he was not too well off financially. 2, 168, 393 & Richmond Cnty Va Order Bk 8, p. 98

Due to the fact that the Northumberland County Record Books for 1672-1706 were either lost or destroyed and the Court Order Books for the same time period are either unindexed or indexed very incompletely, the original microfilmed County Order Books must be checked to obtain further information. Westmoreland Co. Va. Order Bk, p 149 & 393 and;

(vii) JOHN CAVENNER (“John Jay Cavenner”?, “John Jay Cavenah”, “John Jay Cavenner”?, “John Jay Cavender”? & “John Cavender”) probably born about 1689-1690, based upon the dates of births of his brothers and sisters.

He is believed to be the same person mentioned in the Last Will and Testament of John Shordan (“John Sherdon”, "John Shordon"? & "John Sheridan"?) which was probated in Lunenburg Parish, Richmond County, Virginia on June 1, 1709 and in which his widowed and re-married mother, Elin Eaches, (also “Eleanor Eroche”, “Elin Eroche”, “Elinor Eroche”, “Elinor Eaches”, “Eliner Eaches” & “Elinor Cavender”?) was the named the Executrix, and in which his brother, Daniel Cavenner, (“Daniel Caverner”?, “Daniel Cavener”?, "Daniel Cavener", “Daniel Cavenough”? & “Daniel Cavender”?), was to receive either a "hat of a half-crown price" or “half of a half-crown piece”, and John Cavenner (“John Cavender”?) and his mother, formerly Elinor Cavenner (“Elinor Cavender”) were to jointly receive the remainder of his estate. 393 & Richmond Cnty, Va Will Bk 1, p.128-129


Download 8.16 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   ...   164   165   166   167   168   169   170   171   ...   224




The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2020
send message

    Main page