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On March 18, 1777, Joseph Cavender enlisted as a private for a period of 3 years in Company "C" commanded by Capt. James Foster, which Company was a part of the 15th Virginia Regiment commanded by Lieut. Colonel James Innes. His pay was listed as being 6 2/3 dollars per month, which at that time apparently was about 2 pounds when calculated in Virginia currency.

In February 1778, Company "C" was commanded by Capt. James Gray and the 15th Virginia Regiment was commanded by Major Gustavus B. Wallace ("Gustavus Wallace"). In June 1778, the 15th Virginia Regiment was commanded by Lieut. Colonel John Cropper. In August 1778 while in White Plains, the 15th. Virginia Regiment was commanded by Daniel Morgan, Esq. In October 1778, Joseph Cavender was then serving in Company "C" of the 11th Virginia Regiment commanded by Company Commander, James Gray, and Regimental Commander, Daniel Morgan, Esq. In December 1778, the 11th Virginia Regiment was commanded by Abraham Buford, Esq.

The location known as “Buford Battleground” is located in Lancaster County, South Carolina, at the crossroads of Highway 522 and Highway 9. There is a large mass grave with white quartz rocks piled around it and a monument with the following inscription:

“Buford Battleground - Erected to the memory and in honor of the brave and patriotic American soldiers who fell in the battle which occurred at this place on the 29th of May, 1780, between Col. Abraham Buford who commanded a regiment of 350 Virginians and Col. Tarleton of the British Army with 350 Calvary and a like number of Infantry. Nearly the entire command of Col. Buford were either killed or wounded. Gallant soldiers are buried in this grave that left their homes for the relief of Charleston, hearing at Camden of the surrender of that city were returning. Here their lives were ended in the service of their country. The cruelty and barbarous massacre committed on this occasion by Tarleton and his command after the surrender of Col. Buford and his regiment originated the war cry, 'Remember Tarleton's Quarters'.”

A British historian confessed that, at this battle, the virtue of humanity was totally forgotten. There is also a historical roadside marker that was erected by Lancaster County in 1941 which reads as follows:

"Buford's Bloody Battleground - Col. Buford's 11th Virginia Regiment and a detachment of Washington's Calvary, retreating after the fall of Charles Town, were attacked by Col. Tarleton, May 29, 1780, at the site of the monument 955 feet Southwest. The American loss was 113 killed, 150 wounded, 53 made prisoner; the British, 5 killed 14 wounded. In that grave lie many of Col. Buford's men."

According to another account, Col. Abraham Buford commanded the 11th Virginia which was captured at Charleston on May 12, 1780, but without him for some reason. He was leading a small force of veterans and recruits collected in Virginia and marching to Charleston when the capitulation occurred. He was stopped at Leneud's Ferry and ordered to return north. British Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton caught him at Waxhaws, South Carolina, on May 29, 1780. The slaughter that followed was partly due to Buford's order to delay firing for better effect which now let the British sabers fall on now ineffective infantry. Buford fled with his cavalry and served to the end of the war but without further major command.

On December 9, 1779, Joseph Cavender was listed as being on leave, and from January 1, 1782 until April 1, 1782, he was listed as being a Sergeant in Company "C" of the 1st.Virginia Regiment in a Battalion commanded by Lt. Colonel Thomas Posey. Thus, it appears that he just missed being in Buford’s Battle. From September 1, 1782 to May 19, 1783, he was listed as being a Sergeant in Company "C" of the 3rd. Company of the Virginia detachment commanded by Major Samuel Finley and was a stewart to General Greene. Apparently, Joseph Cavender did not receive any pay during his service, and on July 3, 1783 he received payment of 109 pounds, 19 shillings, and 10 pence.14

It is to be noted that a John Cavender is recorded as having either enlisted or re-enlisted in the Revolutionary War in either Muky Town or Mukytown in Amelia County, Virginia on December 20, 1779, the same date that Joseph Cavender enlisted. At the time of enlistment, John Cavender was listed as being 17 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches tall, had dark hair and blue eyes, whereas, Joseph Cavender was listed as then being 19 years of age, 5 feet 7 ½ inches tall, and also having dark hair and blue eyes. According to Revolutionary War records, on February 15, 1776, a John Cavender enlisted for term of 2 years in the Company of Captain William Taylor in the 2nd. Virginia Regiment commanded by Col. Christian Febiger. He apparently enlisted subsequently re-enlisted on February 27, 1777 as a Corporal in the Company of Capt. Joseph Powell which was in the Regiment commanded by Col. John Patton.

On October 4, 1794, Joseph Cavender was living Chesterfield County, Virginia and, as the executor of the estate of his father, Hugh Cavender, sold to William Blake ("William Blaik") 100 acres of land located on the waters of the Horsepen Creek in Charlotte County, which land was formerly owned by Hugh Cavender and adjacent to the lands of William Blake, a farmer, and an Elmore. The Indenture was apparently witnessed by Joseph Cavender's brother, Eudaley James Cavender ("Eudaley Cavender"), and by William Thiueatt and was recorded on October 6, 1794.32 At least by February 28, 1798, Joseph Cavender had married a Susanna Ware in Virginia, at which time William Ware, Sr. of Chesterfield County, Virginia jointly gave to his son-in-law, Joseph Cavender, his daughter, Susanna Cavender, and his grandson, Thomas Cavender, 87 acres of land on which they were then living, and which was part of the land on which William Ware, Sr., was also then living.38 & 120

Joseph Cavender was living in Powhatan County, Virginia in 1803. 46, 120 & 133 From 1806-1817 he may have lived in either Georgia or South Carolina. 356 However, by August 31, 1818, he had moved to Franklin County, Kentucky where he was living when he executed his pension application on that date, and by which time it is believed by some that he had a wife and six children. However, in a formal letter from Washington, D.C., it is stated that, in Joseph Cavender's application for pension dated August 31, 1818, at which time he was a resident of Franklin County, Kentucky, that there were no children then living with him. Effective either August 31, 1818 or May 12, 1819, he was granted a Revolutionary War pension No. S35818 in the amount of $8 per month. In a supporting affidavit executed by Joseph Cavender on October 2, 1820, he stated that he was then living in Christian County, Kentucky (which includes the City of Hopkinsvile), and was 61 years of age.

Apparently, Joseph Cavender received a Revolutionary War Land Warrant No 2719 which he apparently never exercised but, instead, sold to a Major Peter Bruin who exercised it in Kentucky according to “Jillsons Old Kentucky Deeds”, and “Wm. & Mary Quarterly, Vol.2, p.364".

Joseph Cavender died shortly after he filed an affidavit on October 2, 1820 in Christian County, Kentucky in support for a Revolutionary War pension Application No. 10508 and which was granted as No. S35818. Christian County, Kentucky includes the city of Hopkinsville which is located in the Western part of Kentucky. Apparently he had filed an earlier pension application No. 10508 which he stated that he had lost. He further stated in his affidavit that, at that particular point in time which was shortly before he died, that his entire possessions: 6 knives and forks, a small earthen dish, 6 teacups and saucers, 6 teaspoons, 1 pot, 1 kettle, 1 ax, 1 coffee pot and 6 plates. Thus, it appeared that he owned virtually nothing and probably had no family living at home at the time he died.

By 1820, the families of Joseph Cavender and his son Thomas Cavender were living Christian County, Kentucky (which includes the City of Hopkinsvile) as Sometime between 1805-1806, Susannah Cavender and Joseph Cavender must have divorced as Susannah Cavender later married John Crouch of Pittsylvania County, Virginia. After living in Virginia for 7-8 years, John Crouch and Susannah Crouch also moved to Williamson County, Tennessee.70

A Thomas Cavender paid poll taxes in Williamson County, Tennessee in both 1808 and in 1809 and Eudaley James Cavender was then residing, and may have been the same Thomas Cavender mentioned above who was the son of Joseph Cavender.

On December 13, 1821, Joseph Cavender's son, Thomas Cavender, then also living in Christian County, Kentucky (which includes the City of Hopkinsvile), purchased 50 acres of land in Williamson County, Tennessee on Pooks Creek and West Harpeth River which is close to the farm of Eudaley James Cavender and his family. However, approximately one year later, Thomas Cavender sold the 50 acres he had previously purchased, probably because of the bad health of his father, Joseph Cavender, who died in Christian County August 13, 1826 at the age of 67, thus born in either 1758 or 1759. When Joseph Cavender died at the age of 67, the following article apparently appeared in a local newspaper: "Joseph Cavender, an old Revolutionary War soldier, committed suicide last month near Hopkinsville (Kentucky) by drinking ladanurn. On the pervious day, he showed several persons two phials full which he said he had procured for that purpose. He was an honest, innocent old man, and there is a general regret in his neighborhood that he should have committed such and act." 355

The children of Joseph Cavender and Susannah Cavender included at least one son, and possibly one daughter listed below.



Thomas Cavender, who is believed to have been born about 1782 in Virginia, and who married Elizabeth Bailey ("Betsy Bailey" & "Bidsay Bailey") in Chesterfield County, Virginia on September 30, 1803. Betsy Bailey was the daughter of Abram Bailey and the witness and surety of their marriage were Jeremiah Bailey and Archer Bailey ("Archie Bailey"). Thomas Cavender and his wife Bidsey Cavender ("Betsy Bailey") and Joseph Cavender and his wife, Susanna Cavender, jointly sold their homesteads and land in Chesterfield County, Virginia on October 31, 1806 54 Eventually, Joseph Cavender and his son, Thomas Cavender, and his wife moved to Christian County, Kentucky (which includes the City of Hopkinsvile). In both 1808 and 1809 a Thomas Cavender was living in Williamson County, Tennessee and owned no land. By 1810 he had moved. The Joseph Cavender family first appears in the Christian County, Kentucky census of 1820 but does not appear in the 1830 census. Whereas, the Thomas Cavender family does not appear in the Fayette County, Kentucky census until 1830. On December 13, 1821, Thomas Cavender, then living in Christian County, Kentucky (which includes the City of Hopkinsvile), purchased from James Hughes 50 acres of land on Pooks Creek and West Harpeth River in Williamson, County, Tennessee, apparently intending to move to Tennessee near his uncles and cousins then living in Williamson County.122 However, on November 4, 1822, while still living in Christian County, Kentucky he sold the same land back to James Hughes as he apparently changed his mind about moving to Williamson County, Tennessee. Thomas Cavender's father committed suicide in Christian County, Kentucky (which includes the City of Hopkinsvile) on August 13, 1826 at the age of 67, apparently being of poor health, which may account for the actions of his son Thomas in deciding against moving to Tennessee. From at least 1830 to 1840, Thomas Cavender family were living in Fayette County, Kentucky and sometime thereafter he and his family apparently moved out of the State. It is to be noted that Elizabeth A. Cavender ("Elizabeth Cavender"), the wife of Reuben Cavender, was born about 1823, died about 1853, and is buried in the Old Union Cemetery in Russell, Cave Pike in Fayette County, Kentucky.

Thomas Cavender, who was also living in Christian County, Kentucky on December 13, 1821, purchased 50 acres of land on Pooks Creek and West Harpeth River in Williamson, County, Tennessee, apparently in contemplation of moving near his relatives in Williamson County. 122 However, on November 4, 1822, he sold the land back to the seller as he apparently decided to stay in Christian County, Kentucky, probably because of the poor health of his father. 13, 14, 70, 73, 74, 77, 127, 122, 224, 265 & 281

According to DAR Application No 647898 which was filed March 15, 1979 in the Mt. Garfield Chapter of Delta, Colorado DAR, by Bernice Cavender Cockroft ("Bernice Cockroft") wife of Albert A. Cockroft ("Albert Cockroft"), then residing at Austin, Colorado, RR1, P.O. Box 155-D, 81410, she stated that she was a descendant of the above Joseph Cavender who subsequently married a Zervia Aikens (“Zaraviah Aikens”?) and that Joseph Cavender had the following additional children:



Richmond Cavender born about 1805 and married a Nancy Hardesey (actually "Nancy Hardesty") on January 17, 1825 in Henderson County, Kentucky. Nancy Hardesty was the daughter of Henry Hardesty and Hannah Howard;

Ezekiel Cavender born about 1806, first married a Sarah and later married Lucinda Hancock on August 16, 1826 in Henderson County, Kentucky;

Obedience Cavender who married Alpheus Palmer (“Alpheneus Palmer”?) on April 20, 1824 in Christian County, Kentucky. Assuming she was 18 years old when she married, then she would have been born about 1806.279 However, Obedience Cavender may have been the daughter of Thomas Cavender who was the son of Joseph Cavender; and,

Joseph Cavender, Jr. (“Joseph H. Cavender”?) born about 1810 in Tennessee and married a Zervia Aikens.

356, 418 & 448

(II) ELIZABETH CAVENDER ("Betsy Cavender") is believed to have been born about 1767 in the Flat Creek ("Flatt Creek") area of Raleigh Parish, Amelia County, Virginia near the Appomattox River, and who first married Thomas Shelton on April 19, 1780 in the Linville Creek Baptist Church in Shenandoah Valley, Rockingham County, Virginia, and who was born about 1755. The ceremony was conducted by John Alderson, Jr.371 whose father, John Alderson Sr., founded the Baptist church in Linville Creek (sometimes “Linvill Creek”) on August 6, 1756.371

In 1757, the Indians first invaded and the people moved 40-50 miles below Blue Ridge. In 1763, the Indians struck again and, in 1777 John Alderson, Jr. moved to Greenbrier County, Virginia, now West Virginia, at New River and founded the Greenbrier Baptist Church located in Greenbrier Parish in Greenbrier County, Virginia, now Monroe County, West Virginia.374 Apparently, quite a number of Shelton families moved from Amelia County, Virginia to both Middlesex County, Virginia and to Henry County, Virginia. No investigation has yet been made as to whether or not the above Thomas Shelton later moved for a short period of time to either of the two counties named.

Following the decease of Thomas Shelton in Greenbrier County, Elizabeth Cavender (formerly “Elizabeth Shelton”) married Jeremiah Compton on October 25, 1784 in the Greenbrier Baptist Church in Greenbrier Parish of Amelia County, Virginia which later became Greenbrier County, West Virginia, and still later became Monroe County, West Virginia. Jeremiah Compton was the son of John Compton and Elizabeth Mundy. Elizabeth Cavender’s older brother Joseph Cavender posted the security bond, her father Hugh Cavender gave his consent, and her mother Francis Cavender(“Frances Cavender”) and her sister Betsey Cavender (“Elizabeth Cavender”) witnessed the consent of her father. Consent of parents on marriage bond was then required only if the woman was under 18 years of age.16 133, 294 & 355



1767 is also the estimated date of birth of Sally Cavender (“Sarah Cavender”), the sister of the above Elizabeth Cavender and who married Archibald Compton on December 18, 1784 with the security bond being posted by Archibald Compton and Jeremiah Compton, and with her father Hugh Cavender giving his consent. Again, as consent of parents was then required only if the woman was under 18 years of age, and again assuming Elizabeth Cavender was 17 years of age when she married, then she would have likewise been born about 1767. Thus, there is a very good possibility that the above Elizabeth Cavender and Sally Cavender were twins, particularly since twins occurred quite often in future generations.

John Compton is believed to have been born about 1700-1720 in either England, Maryland or Virginia and died before 1784 in Amelia County, Virginia. Elizabeth Mundy Compton is believed to have been born about 1710-1730, died after 1786 in Amelia County, Virginia?, and is believed to have been born in Amelia County, Virginia. The children of Jeremiah Compton and Elizabeth Mundy Compton were:



Caleb Compton;

Elizabeth Compton born about who married a John White;

Meredith Compton who married Sarah Board on December 11, 1795 in Bedford County, Virginia;

Joshua Compton;

Micajah Compton;

Archibald Compton who married Sarah Cavender? on December 8, 1784 in Amelia County, Virginia and who was the daughter of Hugh Cavender and Frances Eudaley and the sister of Elizabeth Cavender who married Jeremiah Compton, the brother of Archibald Compton.

Reuben Compton;

Joel Compton who married Nancy Chapman on December 14, 1786 in Amelia County, Virginia;

Jeremiah Compton who married Sarah Cavender's sister named Elizabeth Cavender ("Betsy Cavender")? on October 25, 1784 in Amelia County, Virginia and was the daughter of Hugh Cavender and Frances Eudaley. Jeremiah Compton and Sarah Compton had a daughter named:

Elizabeth Compton who married John Cavender made application in Pittsylvania County, Virginia on November 28, 1815 for permission to married Elizabeth Compton. Her father, Jeremiah Compton, gave his consent to the marriage, John Cavender and Edmond Chumbley posted the required bond of $150. It is of interest to note that Edmond Chumbley was the person who had previously married Mary Compton the daughter of Archibald Compton who had previously married Hugh Cavender’s daughter, Sarah Cavender (“Sally Cavender”). Thus, Archibald Compton was probably the the brother of Jeremiah Compton who had previously married the apparent twin sister of Sarah Cavender named Elizabeth Cavender. The consent of Jeremiah Compton was witnessed by Edmond Chumbley (“Edmund Chumbley”) and John Faris (“John Feris” & “John Furis”). The actual documents read as follows:

KNOW all men by these presents, That we John Cavender and Edmond Chumbley are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency Wilson C. Nicholas Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia and to his successors in office for the use of the Commonwealth in the just and full sum of one hundred and Fifty dollars - to which payment, well and truly to be made, we bind ourselved and each of us, our herirs executors and administrators firmly by these presents - sealed with our seals and dated this 28th day of November 1815. The Condition of the above obligation is such, That whereas, the bound John Cavender hath this day obtained a license for his intermarriage with Elizabeth Compton of the said County, Now, if there is lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, then this obligation is void, else remain in force and virtue.” Signed by John Cavender and Edmond Chumbley by their marks.

A further document read as follows:

“This is to certify that the Clerk of Pittsylvania is at liberty to isue (sic) Sicence (sic) for John Cavender to marry my daughter Elizabeth given under my hand this 27th of November 1815.” Signed by Jeremiah Compton by his mark, and, witnessed by John Faris by his signature and by Edmond Chumbley by his mark.

It is significant to note that in March 1815, John Cavender brought suit against John Faris in the county court of Pittslvania County, Virginia. Plaintiff by his attorney asked for dismissal. Later, on March 22, 1822, the suit by John Cavender against John Faris was continued, a jury was sworn, and a verdict was rendered for John Cavender for $40 for damages. A motion was made by the attorney for John Faris to order the verdict set aside, that the defendant pay for the trial, and requested a new trial at the next court. Following two continuances, the suit abates because of the death of John Faris.

If John Cavender, the son of Hugh Cavender, was born about 1776, then in 1815 he would have been about 39 years of age when he married Elizabeth Compton. If John Cavender was born about 1776 and his older brother William Cavender was born about 1773, then obviously John Cavender could not have been the son of William Cavender.

Jane Compton ("Jenny Compton") who married Richard White on December 27, 1784 in Amelia County, Virginia. Note that a John White married Nancy Cavender on March 4, 1796 in Dorchester County, Maryland. 16, 30, 133, 149, 222, 294, 350, 355 & 410

On April 23, 1779, John Compton, Jr. of Amelia County, Virginia sold to John Tabb of the same county 100 acres of land in Amelia county whereon the late father of John Compton, John Compton, Sr., lived. The land is adjacent to the lines of Joseph Eggleston, William Hutchason ("William Hutchinson"?), John Compton and John Tabb. The indenture was witnessed by Thomas Tabb, John White (Note that a John White married Nancy Cavender on March 4, 1796 in Dorchester County, Maryland.), and Williamson Piles.DB15/27 The will of John Compton, Jr. was probated in Amelia County, Virginia in 1784 and his ten surviving children were named therein, out of a total of eleven children. Apparently, Jeremiah Compton and Elizabeth Compton had a daughter likewise named Elizabeth Compton who may have been the same Elizabeth Compton who married a John Cavender on November 28, 1815 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia and who was listed as being the daughter of Jeremiah Compton and with Edmond Chumbley being the surety. Assuming that Elizabeth Compton was 16-17 years of age when she married, because her father gave his consent because she was probably not of legal age to marry, then she would have been born about 1798-1799. Edmond Chumbley apparently is the same person who had previously married Mary Compton who was the daughter of Archibald Compton (the brother of Jeremiah Compton), who had previously married John Cavender’s older sister named Sarah Cavender Thus, there is the strong possibility that this particular John Cavender was the youngest son of Hugh Cavender and Frances Eudaley of Amelia County, Virginia. The only evidence to the contrary is that John Cavender would have been about 39 years old when he married a very much younger Elizabeth Compton and that he would have been her uncle, which of course was not “unheard of” in those particular days. Also, there is the possibility that this particular John Cavender was a grandson of Hugh Cavender who stayed in the area when the rest apparently scattered.

(III) SARAH CAVENDER ("Sally Cavender", "Sallie Cavender" & "Sarah Cavender") is believed to have been born about 1767 in the Flat Creek ("Flatt Creek") area of Raleigh Parish, Amelia County, Virginia near the Appomattox River, married Archibald Compton on December 8, 1784 in Amelia County, Virginia, died March 14, 1840 in Halifax County, Virginia? and is believed to have been buried in Halifax County, Virginia.

1767 is also the estimated date of birth of her sister, Elizabeth Cavender ("Betsy Cavender") who first married Thomas Shelton on April 19, 1780 in the Linville Creek (or “Linvill Creek”) Baptist Church in the Shenandoah Valley section of Rockingham County, Virginia. 371 Apparently following the decease of Thomas Shelton in Greenbrier County, Betsy Cavender ("Elizabeth Cavender") subsequently married Jeremiah Compton in Amelia County, Virginia on October 25, 1784. Jeremiah Compton and Elizabeth Cavender’s older brother Joseph Cavender posted the security bond, and her parents Hugh Cavender and Frances Cavender gave their consent. Consent of parents on marriage bond was then required only if the woman was under 18 years of age. Thus, assuming Elizabeth Cavender was 17 years of age when she married for apparently the second time, then she would have been born about 1767. 16 133, 294 & 355


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