Enter the Title of Master Thesis Here: Enter Subtitle Here (Optional)



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Enter the Title of Master Thesis Here:

Enter Subtitle Here (Optional)



MBA/MA 4003X000

Enter Your Name Here

C.E. Prof. Waseda K.

Key, words, go, here



This is an example style of the summary of master thesis of Graduate School Asia and Pacific Study. The summary is only one page. So font size is very small. Default font is Times New Roman 8pt. First line is main title of your thesis. It is 12pt, capital letters, centering. Next item is sub title. It is optional, so you can delete second line, font size is 10.5pt and centering it. Next line is your major, student number, your full name and your Chief Examiner's name. Next line is keywords of your manuscript. You should input 3 or 4 keywords (not include same word in title or sub title, because this summary will be searched by many people by using some keyword/title search system.) After keywords line, body is started. The body contains purpose of your thesis and main results. Text body is two columns. The number of words is about 1300, but not over one page. You can include the pictures/tables of main results. The width of picture/table is not over the length of one column. At the last of body, main references are needed.

There are 7 styles: MAIN TITLE, SUB TITLE, NAME and C.E., Keyword, Reference, Reference Item and normal. Normal style is for text body. Reference is just headings.

The following examples (sentence, equation, and references) are taken from the Fourth Edition of the American Psychological Associations Publication Manual:
1. An abstract is a brief, comprehensive summary of the contents of the article; it allows readers to survey the contents of an article quickly and, like a title, is used by abstracting and information services to index and retrieve articles.
2. A well-prepared abstract can be the most important paragraph in your article. Most people will have their first contact with an article by seeing the abstract, usually on a computer screen with several other abstracts, as they are doing a literature search through an electronic abstract-retrieval system. Readers frequently decide on the basis of the abstract whether to read the entire article; this is true whether the reader is at a computer or is thumbing through a journal. The abstract needs to be dense with information but also readable, well organized, brief and self-contained. Also embedding many key words in your abstract will enhance the user's ability to find it.
3. Place short and simple equations, such as a=[(1+b)/x]1/2, in the line of text. Equations in the line of text should not project above or below the line; for example, the equation above would be difficult to set in the line of text if it were in this form:

.

4. The reference list at the end of a journal article documents the article and provides the information necessary to identify and retrieve each source. Authors should choose references judiciously and must include only the sources that were used in the research and preparation of the article. Note that a reference list cites works that specifically support a particular article. In contrast, a bibliography cites works for background or for further reading and may include descriptive notes, as in section 7.03 of the Publication Manual. APA journals require reference lists, not bibliographies. References in APA publications are cited in text with an author-date citation system and are listed alphabetically in the References section in APA style or, for legal materials, in accordance with The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (1991).

After this paragraph, it is loop of previous one for filling this summary template file. This is an example style of the summary of master thesis of Graduate School Asia and Pacific Study. The summary is only one page. So font size is very small. Default font is Times New Roman 8pt. First line is main title of your thesis. It is 12pt, capital letters, centering. Next item is sub title. It is optional, so you can delete second line, font size is 10.5pt and centering it. Next line is your major, student number, your full name and your Chief Examiner's name. Next line is keywords of your manuscript. You should input 3 or 4 keywords (not include same word in title or sub title, because this summary will be searched by many people by using some keyword/title search system.) After keywords line, body is started. The body contains purpose of your thesis and main results. Text body is two columns. The number of words is about 1300, but not over one page. You can include the pictures/tables of main results. The width of picture/table is not over the length of one column. At the last of body, main references are needed.

There are 7 styles: MAIN TITLE, SUB TITLE, NAME and C.E., Keyword, Reference, Reference Item and normal. Normal style is for text body. Reference is just headings.

The following examples (sentence, equation, and references) are taken from the Fourth Edition of the American Psychological Associations Publication Manual:
1. An abstract is a brief, comprehensive summary of the contents of the article; it allows readers to survey the contents of an article quickly and, like a title, is used by abstracting and information services to index and retrieve articles.
2. A well-prepared abstract can be the most important paragraph in your article. Most people will have their first contact with an article by seeing the abstract, usually on a computer screen with several other abstracts, as they are doing a literature search through an electronic abstract-retrieval system. Readers frequently decide on the basis of the abstract whether to read the entire article; this is true whether the reader is at a computer or is thumbing through a journal. The abstract needs to be dense with information but also readable, well organized, brief and self-contained. Also embedding many key words in your abstract will enhance the user's ability to find it.

References

Inoue, T. (2001) Symbolic Computation for Asymptotic Expansions of Multivariate Statistics.(to appear)



Inoue T., Asahi Y., Yamaguchi K. (2001), ‘An Advanced Statistical Information Disclosure over the Internet’, Proceedings of the IAOS Satellite Meeting on Statistics for the Information Society, 208-217.


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