Fuschia color is tony L. Johnson, Peggy Johnson and Lee Johnson’s Relations mostly: Burton Farmer, Carter, Dale, Lound,Haile & Hatcher relations


Children of Squire and Sarah Morgan Boone are



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Children of Squire and Sarah Morgan Boone are:

Sarah BOONE (1724-1815), married in Pennsylvania to John Wilsockson was not a Quaker. They lived on a land grant near the present Cooleemee, Davie County, NC. The family moved to Kentucky probably in 1779.

Israel BOONE (1726-1756) was buried near the present Mocksville, NC. He and his wife had four children, the two daughters died young. The two sons went to Kentucky probably in 1779.

Samuel BOONE (1728-1816?), lived on present Rowan County side of the South Yadkin River. All went to Kentucky, probably in 1779.

Jonathan BOONE (1730-1808?), married Mary Carter. This family also went to Kentucky around 1779.

Elizabeth BOONE (1732-1825), married William Grant about 1750. The family moved to Kentucky.

Daniel BOONE (1734-1820), married Rebecca Bryan. The family settled in Kentucky in October 1779. Additional links for Daniel Boone's family provided at the end of this narrative.

Mary BOONE (1736-1819), married William Bryan and moved to Kentucky.

George BOONE (1739-1820), married Ann Linville and moved to Kentucky.

Edward BOONE (1740-1780), married Martha Bryan and moved to Wilkes County. More info available at boonesociety.org Click on Articles and then The Life & Death of Edward Boone Brother of Daniel.

Squire BOONE, Jr. (1744-1815), married Jane Van Cleave and moved with his family to Kentucky. More info available at boonesociety.org Click on Articles and then Squire Boone Brother of Daniel.

Hannah BOONE (1746-1828), married John Stewart. http://www.emcd.net/boonehistory/squire_boone.htm



Mine and Peg Johnson’s connection to this family

George BOONE IV and Deborah HOWELL.

Hezekiah Boone, Sr. 1735-1823  mar. Rebecca Freelove

Sarah BOONE married John McElyea

Brethren communities

Morgan Bryan
1719 There is also new info found that Thomas Curtis who married Mary Bryan dau. of Morgan & Martha is the one listed 1719 West Nottingham, Chester CO PA tax list where Alexander Ross is listed partner of Morgan Bryan. All clues now lead to a possable finding for Morgan Bryan in these tax listings for Nottingham, PA. http://newsarch.rootsweb.com/th/read/COPE/2003-07/1058042157

In 1730, Morgan Bryan and Alexander Ross, both of Chester County, Pennsylvania, presented a colonization plan to Lieutenant Governor William Gooch of Virginia and his council. They succeeded in getting a grant of several thousand acres south of the Potomac River and west of Opequon Creek, extending to North Mountain


Morgan Bryan's brother, William, is mentioned in Spottsylvania County records:

Page 129, March 5, 1733 - William Bryan of Spottsylvania County to Philip Bourk of same county, 102 acres in St. Marks Parish - 800 pounds of tobacco

Mrs. Bernis Brien of the National Military Home, Dayton, Ohio reports that William Bryan was born 1685, died 1789, aged 104 years. His wife, named Margaret; about 1745, he removed to Staunton River in Roanoke County, VA. His son, William, married Margaret Watson, and he was known as William Bryan of Roanoke. William, Sr. had several son, viz:

William Bryan, Jr.


David Bryan

John Bryan

James Bryan

Robert Bryan

Morgan Bryan

The tax lists of Orange County for the year 1739 contain the name of Thomas Curtis http://genforum.genealogy.com/bryan/messages/4637.html


Thomas Curtis, 418 acres, probably in what is now Berkeley County, W. Va. http://genforum.genealogy.com/bryan/messages/4637.html
Frederick CO VA deed- 11 Nov 1747 - Morgan BRYAN to Samuel Bryan -250 acres , granted to Morgan Bryan 12 Nov 1733 - Wit: Samuel STRODE, JOHN and EVAN ELLIS

Note: On the Samuel Bryan will in Rowan CO NC are John and Margaret ELLIS –

A John Ellis married Margaret Bryan 11 Mar 1779 Rowan CO NC.
Samuel Strode is listed brother of Martha Strode who marr. Morgan Bryan (some list in Chester CO PA ca 1719 ).

The Orange County (Va.) records show that Mary Curtiss was appointed administratrix of the estate of Thomas Curtiss July 23, 1741, with Morgan Bryan and Joseph Bryan as bondsmen.


The will of Mary Curtiss was probated in Orange County, February 25, 1742. She makes bequests to her daughter Mary Curtiss, and mentions her father Morgan Bryan and her mother Martha Bryan [sic]. Her brother Joseph Bryan is named as executor.
Mary Curtise daughter of Morgan Bryan wrote her will on 9 Jan 1741/42, and it was proven in Court 25 Feb 1742/41, leaving a riding horse and saddle to her mother, Martha Bryan, and to her daughter "Mary Curtiss" -- all the rest of stock and household goods, "and if she dies without any issue to be divided amongst my brethren": Joseph, Samuel, Morgan, John, William, James and Thomas Bryan and sister Ellinor Linvell. Her father Morgan Bryan and brother Joseph Bryan were named as executors. http://fieldgenealogy.com/p895.htm

.
1741 Mary Curtis Orphaned as an infant; raised by grandparents Morgan and Martha Bryan. Mentioned in his will, Mary Forbis http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=wright1968&id=I20952


26 Feb. 1741. O.S. page 105. On the order for viewing and laying off a road petitioned for by Hobson & Others Morgan BRYAN John FFROST (sic) and Arthur BUCHANNAN the persons ordered to lay of y s road made their return as followeth  In pursuance of an order of Court We hav viewed and laid off a road from Evan WATKINS fferry by a Course of Marked trees to the head of y ffaling Spring thence to Roger Turners thence to Edward Beasons over the Taskerora Branch tence to Joseph EVANS Springhead thence to the Middle Creek thence toNew Chappel Thence by the head of Evan THOMAS Spring head thence to a Corner White oak between the lands of John LiTTLER and John FFROSt thence along the said Line to ye orner S E thence to Seconrns Licks thence to Opecken Creek and Crossing the Same just above John NEILS Mill Branch thence to the Spout run by Edges CABBIN thence to the Kng's road that leads from Just HITES to Shennindo for  We also recommend Thomas Thornberry & John SHEARER to order the Clearing the said road from Evan WATKINS to the CHAPPELL & George HoBSON & John LITTLER from thence to conclude the Same which return being redd to the Court Its ordered that the said road be cleared according to the Viewers report & that all the tithables from Potomack between Opecken & the little Mt. That lyes on this Side the little Cape Capon and thence Southward as far as it includes James WRIGHTS near the Mountains and Joseph CARTERS on Opecken And for over Opecken & Between & Shennando all Such as Shall not exceed 3 miles from the said liad out road work thereon Under the aft Thomas THORNBERRY John SHEARER/: from Evan WATTs'' to the Chappell:/& Under George HOBSON & John Littler: from thence to the end of ye said Road; who are hereby appointed Overssers of the said roa  And its furhter ordered that the said Overseers with ye said Tithables clear the sid roa d & make bridges where they Shall be wanting to keep ye said Road when cleared in repair according to Law.

ORANGE CO Road Orders for 1734-1749, July 1984, by Ann Brush Miller, Research Hist for Orange Co Hist. Society, VA Highway & Trans Research Council, Charlottesville, VA


1743- Morgan & Joseph Bryan admin. estate of Mary CURTIS ( wife of Thomas has been listed ) VS Thomas TURNER & John ELLIS.

Note: this Joseph Bryan should be the father of Rebecca Bryan who marr. Daniel BOONE.
Frederick County (a parent county of Berkley) was formed in 1738 and the records of that county show that Job Curtis was in the area at least as early as January 11, 1744, when he was a witness to a transfer of 1,020 acres of land from Morgan Bryan to Joshua Hedges, after whom the town of Hedgesville was named.
1748 an historic roadway was cut across Lunenburg's western lands from north to south, but was not done by court order. Morgan Bryan, a Pennsylvania Quaker, had led a body of settlers down into Virginia, along the Shenandoah. In 1748 Bryan decided to move his family to the Yadkin River in North Carolina. He made the journey down the Valley of Virginia, crossing the Blue Ridge Mountains through Maggoty Gap (near Boone's Mill), and continued across what is now Franklin and Henry Counties into North Carolina. With the aid of his sons, three months were required to cut and clear a way for the passage of his wagon. In 1753 the Moravian brethren travelled Bryan's road when they came from Pennsylvania to make their settlement in North Carolina, (now Winston-Salem).
They kept a diary of the trip, and noted that after crossing Smith River they came to John Hickey's store. The roadway became known as Morgan Bryan's Road, and was travelled by thousands who made their homes in the Carolinas. http://www.myvirginiagenealogy.com/va_county/pi.htm
In 1748 an historic roadway was cut across Lunenburg's western lands from north to south, but was not done by court order. Morgan Bryan, a Pennsylvania Quaker, had led a body of settlers down into Virginia, along the Shenandoah. In 1748 Bryan decided to move his family to the Yadkin River in North Carolina. He made the journey down the Valley of Virginia, crossing the Blue Ridge Mountains through Maggoty Gap (near Boone's Mill), and continued across what is now Franklin and Henry Counties into North Carolina. With the aid of his sons, three months were required to cut and clear a way for the passage of his wagon. In 1753 the Moravian brethren travelled Bryan's road when they came from Pennsylvania to make their settlement in North Carolina, (now Winston-Salem). They kept a diary of the trip, and noted that after crossing Smith River they came to John Hickey's store. The roadway became known as Morgan Bryan's Road, and was travelled by thousands who made their homes in the Carolinas. http://www.myvirginiagenealogy.com/va_county/pi.htm

In 1748, the Bryan clan established a settlement in Yadkin Valley, North Carolina, after losing a dispute with Lord Fairfax in Virginia. During the 1770s, members of the Bryan family opened Kentucky for settlement, and later Missouri http://fieldgenealogy.com/p895.htm

David Johnson, bought the farm of Morgan Bryan, sold it March 11, 1751 to Michael Warren, who owned it at the time the acknowledgement was secured in order to perfect the title http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/d/e/u/John-Deutsch-Dexter/FILE/0008page.html
Vol. 3, page 340, September 27, 1753 - Commission to Edward Hughes, Squire Boone and James Carter to take acknowledgement of Martha, wife of Morgan Bryan, to deed, Bryan to David Johnson. Executed and returned May 20, 1754. http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/d/e/u/John-Deutsch-Dexter/FILE/0008page.html

As of circa 1758, Mary CURTIS her married name was Forbes. As of circa 1758,her married name was Forbes. was born circa 1740 at Frederick Co Va

She is reported to have married Robert Forbes in Rowan Co NC

Researcher Notes: This is the granddaughter of Morgan Bran and wife Mary Strode thru their Daughter Mary Bryan anod husband Thomas Curtis who both died in 1741

Researcher Notes: Robert Forbis married Mary Curtis in 1761 (Morgan Bryans grand-daughter) daughter of Mary Bryan b. 1724 who married Thomas Curtis in Va.
Jonathan Forbis married Mary Bryan in 1787 dt. Of Thomas & Sarah Hunt Bryan another (Morgan
Bryan grand-daughter)
Joseph Forbis married Mary Bryan 9/13/1791 in Surry Co. NC. (could Joseph be Jonathan?)

Ellis-Forbis Cemetery earliest recorded burial in Yadkin County near Shallowford and Huntsville.

Thomas Forbes b. 1/2/1760 d. 5/13/1779
John Ellis b. 4/1/1723 d. 1/26/1753
Eliza H. Johnson b. 1736 d. 12/28/1754 age 18 years.
There are 25 unmarked graves in this cemetery. http://boards.ancestry.ca/surnames.forbis/4.37/mb.ashx

I was born on the 15th of November, in the year 1760, in the County of Orange and State of Virginia. My father's name was William Johnson. He died when I was four or five years old. My mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Cave.

I had three brothers, Robert, the eldest, has been dead upward of thirty years; Benjamin, who has been dead nearly fifty years; and Valentine, the youngest, who now lives in Orange City, Va. I had five sisters, Nancy married Wm. Rogers; Mildred married John Sebree; who died at the siege of York in Virginia; Elizabeth married George Eve, who died at Elkhorn more than thirty years ago; Hannah married Robert Bradley, who died in Scott Co. some 40 years ago; Sallie married Laban Shipp, who died in the southern part of Kentucky. After the death of my father, I con- tinued with my mother and worked on the farm. What education I got was at country schools. I learned to read and write and arithmetic so far as to include the rule of three.

On the first day of April, 1779, my Brother Robert, myself and one other man (Wm. Tomlinson) set out from Orange county, Va. for a visit to Kentucky. There was then about two hundred miles of the road from the back settlements on Holston waters to Kentucky that was considered to be quite dangerous, traveling with so small a company as ours (only three); but we pushed on, and at the Cumberland River we overtook a company of several families of Bryants, from North Carolina, on their way to Kentucky, to settle the place since called Bryant's Station, on North Elkhorn. We joined the company and arrived first at Boonesborough where we obtained some little Indian corn, and then went on to North Elkhorn, where we arrived about the last of April. We, that is, Tomlinson and myself, assisted the Bryants in putting up some cabins. Robert Johnson left us and went to Lexington, which had just been settled from about Alleghaney and Monongahela. After viewing and exploring the country some weeks, he return to Virginia. Tomlinson and myself planted about four acres of corn, and after we had finished working it, in July we left for home.

And there I will mention an incident that happened on the way in the wilder- ness. A number, now, of Bryants and others, were along. One company was considerable as to numbers, and when in the wilderness, not far from the Cumberland River, we stopped to eat our dinners and noon it, as it was called and to let our horses graze. While we were stopped, a number of men took their guns and turned out to hunt, wishing to kill deer, and while they were out from camp, one man, Aquila White, shot and killed William Beamlett, mis- taking him for an Indian. Beamlett was a preacher, and one of our company, and there we buried him. Tomlinson and myself reached home in safety.

My brother Robert, having got somewhat acquainted while in Kentucky, with some of the military surveys that had been made by John Floyd, purchased two tracts, and in the fall of that year started with his family to Kentucky, to go by water. He got to Redstone or Brownsville, when the river got too low, and continued so until it froze up. He continued there until spring of the year when he took water and landed at the Falls of Ohio, and moved from there to Beargrass, upon John Floyd's land, where he raised a crop of corn, and sometime during that summer he went out with the expedition under Gen. Clark into the Miami country against the Indians.

And here I will mention another incident which occurred while he resided at Beargrass. The Indians had waylaid the trace that led from the settlement on Beargrass to the Falls, and had killed several people there. Having understood from the spies that were sent out to examine the neighborhood that they had discovered Indian signs, and that they apprehended they might be waylaying that trace, the inhabitants of the Falls and those of the Beargrass settlement raised a company and undertook to examine said trace. They divided into three companies. One marched along the trace, the other two marched through the woods on each side. They found the Indians, as they expected, lying in ambush near the road, and, coming on their backs fired on them, killing them on the spot and wounding one other that got off. The Indians, discovering the men on the trace, fired on them at the same time they were fired on, and wounded one of the white men badly. My brother Robert was one of the men who fired at the Indians. While Robert Johnson, with his family, continued at Beargrass, Richard M. Johnson was born.

I will now go back a little. In the year 1779, some time after our arrival at Bryant's Station , Col. Bowman, who lived on the south side of the Kentucky River, raised what force he could, and crossed the Ohio at the mouth of the Licking, and went up against the Indians where they lived on the little Miami, at old Chillicothe. They got to the town in the morning before daylight un- discovered, and attacked them. The Indians stuck to their houses and fought, and killed several of the best and most daring soldiers. The whites retreated, and the Indians followed them nearly to Ohio.

Robert Johnson moved from Beargrass to Bryant's Station , I think, in the fall of 1780. There he built some cabins, making part of the fort. I, then a young man, was part of his family. Buffalo being very plentiful in the woods, there was not much difficulty in obtaining meat for the families, except that of risking our scalps, from which danger we considered ourselves never absent when out.

The next years, 1781 and 1782, were disasterous for Kentucky. Captain Bird, a British officer from Detroit, with a large force of Indians, came over the Ohio, brought one field-piece (I suppose a six pounder), and captured Riddle's and Martin's stations on the Licking. The Indians also broke up Grant's sta- tion, on the waters of the Licking and killed a number of persons; also Estill's defeat, on the waters of the Licking. Captain Estill was considered on of our best defenders of the Indians. He raised and headed some twelve or fourteen men, said to be good soldiers, to fight Indians, and followed about the same number of Indians as he had men, overtook them and had a severe battle. Captain Estill himself was killed, and near one-half on each side were killed, and they made a draw battle of it.

Another incident I will mention here. Hunting in the woods for our meat being a dangerous business, twelve of us at Bryant's turned out for that purpose, all in company. When we got into the hunting woods, near where Georgetown now stands, we separated into three companies. Wm. Bryant, the head and principal man of the families and station at that time, headed one of the companies. Another of the Bryants headed the company that I belonged to. The agreement when we parted was that we were to meet at night at the mouth of Cane Run on North Elkhorn. Soon after we parted, the Indians, some twelve or fourteen in number, got on the trail of the company I belonged to, (for it was easy to track a single horse in the woods at that time). Our leader, Mr. Bryant had slighted from his horse to shoot a deer. The other three of us were sitting on our horses when the Indians came in sight. I was the first to discover them. We made out to get off before they fired on us, and having the heels of them, we made use of them, and not being strong enough to fight them, we went on to the station. On the next day, twelve or fifteen men of the sta- tion turned out and went to hunt Wm. Bryant and his company, who encamped at the mouth of Cane Run the night before, and were out the next day not far from Georgetown. He discovered the horse that was hobbled, and with a bell on him, that was on the other side of the creek from where he was. He dir- ected the other three of his company to remain where they were, while he should cross the creek and see what it meant. He got over, and when near the horse, the Indians who were in ambush fired on him and wounded him with three balls. His horse, however, carried him off. The company from the station who were on the hunt of him were in hearing of the guns when they fired on him. They rushed on to the place and found the Indians and a battle ensued. They killed one Indian and got his scalp and wounded several more. Five of the whites were wounded; one of them, David Jones, was shot through the middle of the breast, but none of them died except Mr. Bryant , whom the company found in the woods, badly wounded. He was taken to the camp where he died, much lamented.

Again during my residence at the station in 1781, we were in want of salt, and a company of us, about ten or twelve, got on our horses, with our rifles on our shoulders, and started for Bullitt's Lick, near the Falls of the Ohio, where salt was then made. We passed through Lexington, and a little trace to the Kentucky River to Leestown, as it was then called, situated about a half mile below Frankfort. The weather was warm, and we rode down the bank into the water; and while our horses were drinking, all near the bank of the river, a party of Indians that followed us, came on the bank, fired on us and killed one horse, that fell dead in the river. His rider pushed on across the river and the Indians crossed after him and took him prisoner. They wounded five men of our company, all of whom recovered. We gave up our trip and returned to the station.

And again while a man named Daniel Wilcoxen was plowing his corn, in full view of the station about 150 or 200 yards distant, and a man with his son watching as sentry for Indians, a small party crept up near enough and shot and killed him, and one of them with a tomahawk in hand, ran Wilcoxen toward the fort, and was very near getting him, when Wilcoxen jumped the fence, which saved him.

And again, a youth, by the name of Hickey Lea was out of the fort on a horse one morning, into the edge of the woods some 200 or 300 yards, for the pur- pose of grazing the horse, and while he was sitting on the horse, some Indians got near enough and shot the horse, which ran a short distance and fell. The Indians then killed the youth and scalped him.

In 1782, my brother, Robert Johnson, was elected a member of the General Assembly of Virginia, and went to Richmond. I was then also in Virginia. We did not return to Kentucky until after the defeat of the Blue Licks, therefore can say nothing of my own knowledge, as to that and the siege of Simon Girty and the Indians, at Bryant's Station.

About that time, or shortly after, General Clark carried on an expedition against the Indians in the Miami country. My brother, Robert, commanded the company from Bryant's Station, Jeremiah Craig and myself were subalterns. Every man fit for the campaign, except enough to take care of the fort were called out. Col. Benj. Logan was second in command. One wing of the army marched from the Falls, the other from Lexington and Bryant's. They met for general rendezvous on the ground now occupied by Cincinnati, where General Clark took command. We marched through old Chillicothe on the little Miami, on to the Indian town of Piqua on the Big Miami. We had one piece of cannon. The Indians fled and gave us no trouble. They did come back one dark night and fire on us, which caused us to extinguish our fires, but they kept at such a distance as to hurt none of us. Some scouting parties from our camp went out and killed a few Indians and took some prisoners and destroyed their corn fields and villages. We then returned, nearly on the same track we had gone out.

Very shortly after our return home, Col. Thomas Marshall, surveyor of Fayette, who had been waiting for our return of our army, opened his office in Lexing- ton for the entering and surveying of lands. A mighty movement then commenced among the people for entering and surveying. I got the appointment of Deputy Surveyor and commenced surveying, and was considerably in that business for several years. The next year, 1783, the people began to move and settle out on the lands. My brother, Robert, settled on the Big or Great Crossing on North Elkhorn. Captain John Craig settled on Clear Creek, where Payton Short afterwards lived.

Early in 1784 I got married and settled on Green Creek, near Versailles, where it now stands. I was then appointed and commissioned a Militia Captain, and notwithstanding peace was firmly established between England and the United States, yet the Indians continued to be troublesome.

In the year 1786, the government authorized General Clark to carry out another expediton against them, which he undertook, and raised a considerable force. Col. Levi Todd was selected to command Fayette troops, and Benj. Logan from the south of Kentucky; Col. Wm. Steele, Capt. Robert Sanders and myself were selected as Captains, with others whose names I do not recollect. In Col. Todd's regiment we rendezvoused at the Falls, where Gen. Clark took command. He sent his field piece by water down the Ohio and up the Wabash. The army marched by land, and on the way, before reaching Vincennes, the officers held a council of war, and sent Col. Logan back for the purpose of raising another army and marching into the Indian country on the Miami, presuming that the Indians were generally collected on the Wabash in order to meet our expedi- tion. We marched on to Vincennes where we remained a number of days waiting for our cannon, which was detained by low water, until we had eaten up near- ly all our provisions. When the cannon arrived, we marched on up the river about two days, when the regiment that Logan left, mutinied and refused to go further, alleging they had not sufficient stock of provisions, etc. I suppose losing their Colonel had its influence. General Clark was mortified. We returned home. Col. Logan with the command he had raised, went into the Miami country, and succeeded against the Indians fully up to expectations.

In 1789, Woodford County was formed, taken from Fayette, and when the courts were organized, I got the appointment of the County and Quarter sessions; and when Kentucky was made a state, and the courts were reorganized, I again got the appointment to the said courts, which I held until 1796, when I moved to North Bend, in what is now Boone County.

In 1798 an act was passed to establish the said County of Boone, and when the courts were orgainized, I was appointed Clerk of the County Court. Not long after, I was appointed and commissioned a Colonel of the Militia which I held until 1811, about which time I was appointed and commissioned a Justice of the Peace, which office I held until I was commissioned Sheriff of the said county in 1833. In 1813 I was elected a member of the Kentucky Legislature. I have held various other offices and appointments, and filled my stations; have all my life been a farmer and attached to the cultivation of the soil; have served my day and generation, and am now four score and ten, and feel that shortly I must be gathered to my fathers.

Reminiscences from the Life


of Col. Cave Johnson

Written by Cave Johnson, 1849, several months before his passing.


Published in the Ky Register, May 1922, Vol. 20, No.59
Reprinted in the Johnson Digest, by Robert R. & Louise Stracener Payne Private Printing, 1990

(Reminiscences copied from an old printed record in the possession of Mr. William Henry Johnson, Georgetown, Kentucky, January 16, 1922. Annie Payne Giffman)

1760 Nov15: Cave Johnson was among the most prominent early Boone County citizens. He was born 15 Nov 1760 in Orange Co., Va., and died in Boone County 19 Jan 1850. He spent service in the War of the American Revolution, then came to Kentucky in April of 1779 spending time at Bryant's Station near Lexington. He married in 1784 and moved to Woodford County. In 1786 he served with Gen. George Rogers Clark under Col. William Steele as Captain Cave Johnson. [See the roster of his company] He was clerk to the Quarter Sessions of the Woodford County County Court from 1789-1796. In 1792 he was one of the trustees appointed to lay off the town of Versailles. In 1796 he moved to the North Bend of the Ohio River in what was then Campbell County, and soon after united with the Baptist Church at Bullitsburg by letter. At some point he was appointed Colonel of Militia and he served in this post until 1819. About this time he became Justice of the Peace until 1833, when he became Sheriff of Boone County at the venerable age of 73. He was elected to the Kentucky Legislature in 1817. In 1819 he became a charter member of the Sand Run Baptist Church. Cave Johnson and Betsy Craig were married 1 Feb 1784. Betsy died 11 Mar 1833. Cave Johnson and his second wife, Sarah T. Keene, were married 2 Oct 1834. Sarah died 30 Sept 1835, at just over forty years of age. Cave Johnson and Margaret C. Keene were married 1 Dec 1836. She died in 1855, surviving him by five years. He died 19 Jan 1850, and was buried at Sand Run. He was ninety. Cave Johnson The Johnson family was prominent in political affairs. His older brother, Robert Johnson, was elected a member of the General Assembly of Virginia in 1782. Robert moved to Kentucky, and settled at Beargrass, now Louisville. His son, Richard M. Johnson, whom I have written about elsewhere, was vice president under Martin Van Buren (1837-1841). He was said to have killed Tecumseh in battle. Richard was noted as the founder of the Choctaw Academy near Georgetown, Ky., about 1819, taking advantage of his political clout to gain federal funds for the undertaking. He is spoken of in Col. Johnson's Memoirs.

Printed in Boone County Recorder 1 Feb 1877, p. 1 and 8 Feb 1877, p. 1. under the title "The Early Days of Kentucky" http://geocities.com/boonehistory/cavejohnson.html

Robert Forbis married Mary Curtis in 1761 (Morgan Bryans grand-daughter) daughter of Mary Bryan b. 1724 who married Thomas Curtis in Va.
Jonathan Forbis married Mary Bryan in 1787 dt. Of Thomas & Sarah Hunt Bryan another (Morgan
Bryan grand-daughter)
Joseph Forbis married Mary Bryan 9/13/1791 in Surry Co. NC. (could Joseph be Jonathan?)

Ellis-Forbis Cemetery earliest recorded burial in Yadkin County near Shallowford and Huntsville.

Thomas Forbes b. 1/2/1760 d. 5/13/1779
John Ellis b. 4/1/1723 d. 1/26/1753
Eliza H. Johnson b. 1736 d. 12/28/1754 age 18 years.
There are 25 unmarked graves in this cemetery. http://boards.ancestry.ca/surnames.forbis/4.37/mb.ashx
3 April 1763 Morgan Bryan Sr. died Rowan Co NC http://fieldgenealogy.com/p895.htm

1764 July 13, II:533. James Patterson was sued. Justices: Morgan Bryan,

Jno Brandon, Jno Oliphant. (Jo White Linn's "Abstracts of the Minutes of the

Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Rowan County, NC, 1763-1774," v. 2)


12 Apr 1765 (Rowan County NC Deed Book 7. pages 90 & 91) "On the 12th April 1765, John HOWARD, innholder. sold William Todd LIVINGSTON of Orange County. N.C. 313 acres of land on the north bank of the Yadkin River below Mill Creek and Mullberry Fields bought of Morgen BRYAN, Junr. and John BRYAN: "adjoining Morgan BRYANT above Francis RENELD'S Improvement ." (Rowan County Deed Book 6, pages 265 & 266). In 1769, John HOWARD, innholder, sold Francis REYNOLDS 40 acres of land on both sides Yadkin River below Mulberry Creek adjoining said REYNOLDS'S Land ." Pioneers of Wilkes County, Mrs. W. O. Absher, p. 89) SW: REYOLDS

Notes: William Todd LIVINGSTON'S above land in Rowan became part of Surry, then Wilkes Co NC, and was located close to the lands of Edmond DENNEY whose (dau?) Ann, m RW Soldier George Combs of Wilkes Co NC. LIVINGSTON later left Wilkes Co NC for Washington Co VA where he was granted land on Moccassin Creek of the Holston River - where Combs also patented land (later in Russell, then Scott Cos, VA).


1768 Rowan County tax list of Morgan Bryan is found that Benjamin Bentley and Thomas Bentley are included at one poll each. Benjamin was most likely married at this time as he was living separately from his father. Benjamin Bentley, along with his parents, brother, and sisters lived in old Rowan (now Davie) County on Bear Creek, a few miles south of Mocksville. http://yeahpot.com/mikeshortt/thomasbentleysr.html
1774 Aug. 8: CHAPTER IX THE SAFETY COMMITTEE Rowan County has the distinction of being the first county in North Carolina to organize a safety committee.1 This fact shows that the people were keenly alive to the cause of the colonies. The first committee met August 8, 1774. Its members were James McCay, Andrew Neal, George Cathey, Alexander Dobbins, Francis McCorkle, Matthew Locke, Maxwell Chambers, Henry Harmon, Abraham Denton, William Davidson, Samuel Young, John Brevard, William Kennon, George Henry Barringer, Robert Bell, John Bickerstaff, John Cowden, John Lewis Beard, John Nesbit, Charles McDowell, Robert Blackburn, Christopher Beekman, William Sharpe, John Johnston, and Morgan Bryan.

The records of the Rowan Committee of Safety have been preserved in Wheeler's "History of North Carolina" and in the Colonial Records and they give an insight into the opinions and purposes of the times. Though this committee began its administration before the Revolution its actions belong to the Revolutionary period, and will not be discussed in this sketch. 3 Caruthers, 30-31. 4 Bernheim, 260-261. 5 Rumple, 84-85. 6 Col. Rec., IX, xxxii. 7 Col. Rec., IX, 1024-1026; Rumple, 147. 52 James Sprunt Historical Publications

From 1778 until his death 1800 (probate started), John Bryan (1) owned land and probably lived around eight miles southwest of where Morgan Bryan, Sr. last lived.  John Bryan, Sr. lived in an area of Rowan County, North Carolina that, in 1836, became west central part of Davie County, North Carolina.  Through numerous land transactions, it has been determined that John Bryan (1) lived in Rowan County, North Carolina from 1778 to 1800 and that he had the following neighbors (some deeds from the probate records):   Benjamin Gaither (1778 - 1803), Thomas Pennery (1778 - 1796), William Williams (1778 - 1787), Robert Luckey (1778 - 1787), John Van Eaton (1778), Valentine Huff (1783 - 1802), John Adams (1784), Mary Luckey (1784 - 1796), Ralph Vaneleave (1784), John Hughey (1784), George Wilcoxon (1784), John Bryan, Jr. (1787 - 1797), Daniel Sutherland (1787), John Pinchback (1787), Richard Speaks (1787), William Patrick (1787), Jacob Nichols (1787), Samuel Reed (1787), Jacob Trout (1796 - 1801), John Little, Sr. (1801), Beal Ijams (1801) and Jacob Coon (1802).   It is also known from these deeds that they all lived near the following Creeks:  Bear Creek (great majority of deeds), Hunting Creek and Dutchman’s Creek. http://www.rcasey.net/bryan/bryjohn1.htm

1797 ERA: The will of John Bryan was signed in 1797 and probated in 1801.  This will clearly establishes that the wife of John Bryan was named Sarah.  Land associated with this will clearly establish that this was the will of the John Bryan who lived on or near Bear Creek and Dutchman’s Creek (this is approximately eight miles southwest from where Morgan Bryan last lived).  Also, several children of John Bryan (1) are known to resided in this same area.  To date, this author has never seen any primary documentation that links John and Frances Bryan (or any of their known children) to the area around where Morgan Bryan last lived. http://www.rcasey.net/bryan/bryjohn1.htm

1836 Hawkins
County Tax List--

Civil District 10: Beginning at the mouth of Big Creek and running down the


river to the mouth of Crocketts Creek thence up said creek to the mouth of
the land that divides the lands of Lazarus Lawson and James McClure then
along said land to the stage road crossing the same and with the dividing
line of said Lawson and McClure to the top of Caney Creek Knobs then a
straight line to the mouth of the land that divides the land of Daniel Lipe
and Thomas Ingram then through said land crossing Caney Creek and following
the road and crossing the house where Orville formerly lived leaving said
house to the east and following the path that leads from Orville's to Wax's
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