History of medicine and health care 2013 Honors College; History 1090; Sociology 1488; shrs 2906 coordinators: Jonathon Erlen, Ph. D. 648-8927-office


Gutman, Oliver. “On the fringes of the Corpus Aristotelicum: The Pseudo-Avicenna "Liber Celi et Mundi." Early Science and Medicine, 1997, 2(2): 109-128



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Gutman, Oliver. “On the fringes of the Corpus Aristotelicum: The Pseudo-Avicenna "Liber Celi et Mundi." Early Science and Medicine, 1997, 2(2): 109-128.

Caglar, E.; et. al. “Prevalence of dental caries and tooth wear in a Byzantine population (13th c. A.D.) from northwest Turkey.” Archives of Oral Biology, 2007, 52: 1136-1145.


Najar, Jalal. “From anesthetic sponge to nonsinking skull perforator, unitary work neurosurgery in the ancient Arabic and Islamic world.” World Neurosurgery, 2010, 73(5): 587-594.
Shefer-Mossensohn, Miri. “To be a sick sultana in the Ottoman imperial palace: Male doctors, female healer and female patients.” HAWWA: Journal of Women of the Middle East and the Islamic World, 2011, 9(3): 281-312.
Millan, Cristina Alvarez. “The case history in Medieval Islamic medical literature: Tajārib and Mujarrabāt as source.” Medical History 2010 (54): 195-214.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2844281/
Adhami, Siamak. “Two Pahlavi chapters on medicine.” Early Science and Medicine, 2011, 16: 331-351.
Nutton, Vivian. “Byzantine medicine, genres, and the ravages of time.” Zipser, Barbara. Medical Books in the Byzantine World. Bologna: Eikasmos Online II, 2013. p. 7-18.
Stathakopoulos, Dionysios. “Disease and where to treat it: a Byzantine vade mecum.” Zipser, Barbara. Medical Books in the Byzantine World. Bologna: Eikasmos Online II, 2013. p. 19-35.
Bennett, David. “Aristotle and the Caliph's Dream. Aspects of medical translations.” Zipser, Barbara. Medical Books in the Byzantine World. Bologna: Eikasmos Online II, 2013. p. 79-96.
Bhayro, Siam. “The reception of Galen's Art of medicine in the Syriac Book of medicines.” Zipser, Barbara. Medical Books in the Byzantine World. Bologna: Eikasmos Online II, 2013. p. 123-144.

Horden, Peregrine. “Medieval hospital formularies: Byzantium and Islam compared.” Zipser, Barbara. Medical Books in the Byzantine World. Bologna: Eikasmos Online II, 2013. p. 145-164.


Markowetz, Florian. “Cancerous cells, Neanderthal DNA and the tradition of Byzantine medicine. Textual criticism in philology and genomics.”
Zipser, Barbara. Medical Books in the Byzantine World. Bologna: Eikasmos Online II, 2013. p. 165-179.
Shefer-Mossensohn, M.; and Hershkovitz, K. Abou. “Early Muslim medicine and the Indian context: A reinterpretation.” Medieval Encounters, 2013, 19: 274-299.
September 9 Monday

Galenism: Medical Theory and Practice in Medieval and Renaissance Europe

by Carey Balaban, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, Otolaryngology and Neurobiology
Temkin, Owsei. Galenism: Rise and Decline of a Medical Philosophy. Ithaca: Cornell

University Press, 1973. Pp. 1-94.


Dean-Jones, David E. “Galen on the Constitution of the Art of Medicine: Introduction,

Translation and Commentary.” Ph.D. thesis, 1993. Pp. 24-50.


Lieber, Elinor. “Galen in Hebrew: The transmission of Galen’s works in the medieval

Islamic world.” in Galen: Problems and Prospects. Pp. 167-186.


Wear, Andrew. “Galen in the Renaissance.” in Galen: Problems and Prospects.

  1. 229-262.

Carey, Hilary M. “Astrological medicine and the Medieval English folded almanac.” Social History of Medicine 2004 (17): 345-363.


Garcia-Ballester, Luis. “Improving health: A challenge to European medieval Galenism.” In Coping with Sickness: Perspectives on Health Care, Past and Present, Pp. 53-72.
Meaney, Audrey. “The practice of medicine in England about the year 1000.” Society for the Social History of Medicine 2000 (13): 221-237.

Wallis, Faith. “Signs and senses: Diagnosis and prognosis in early Medieval pulse and urine tests.” Society for the Social History of Medicine 2000 (13): 265-278.


Maclean, Ian. “The “Sceptical Crisis” reconsidered: Galen, rational medicine and the Libertas Philosophandi.” Early Science and Medicine, 2006, 11(3): 247-274.
McVaugh, Michael. “Niccolo da Reggio’s translations of Galen and their reception in France.” Early Science and Medicine, 2006, 11(3): 275-301.
Van Oppenraay, Aafke M. I. “The reception of Aristotle’s History of Animals in the marginalia of some Latin manuscripts of Michael Scot’s Arabic-Latin translation.” Early Science and Medicine, 2003, 8(4): 387-403.

Rocca, Julius.” Galen and Greek neuroscience (Notes Towards a Preliminary Survey).” Early Science and Medicine, 1998, 3(3): 216-240.

Fortuna, Stefania. “The Latin editions of Galen’s Opera omnia (1490-1625) and their prefaces.” Early Science and Medicine, 2012, 17: 391-412.


Cooper, Glen M. “Galen and astrology: A misalliance?” Early Science and Medicine, 2011, 16: 120-146
Fortuna, Stefania. “The late editions of Galen’s Opera omnia. (1490-1625) and their prefaces.” Early Science and Medicine, 2012, 17: 391-412.
Perilli, Lorenzzo. “A risky enterprise: e Aldine edition of Galen, the failures of the editors, and the shadow of

Erasmus of Rotterdam.” Early Science and Medicine, 2012, 17: 446-466.


Savino, Christina. “Giovanni Battista Rasario and the 1562–1563 edition of Galen. Research, exchanges and f.orgeries.” Early Science and Medicine, 2012, 17: 413-445.

September 11 Wednesday class starts at 1:15pm

To Dissect or Not to Dissect? Ancient and Medieval Perspectives

by Carey Balaban, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, Otolaryngology and Neurobiology

Medicine and Western Civilization. “Vesalius.” p.54.
Medicine and Western Civilization. “Baldasar Heseler.” p. 61.

Hope, Valerie M. “Contempt and respect: the treatment of the corpse in ancient Rome.” In Death and Disease in the Ancient City. pp. 104-127.


Bodel, John. “Dealing with the dead: Undertakers, executioners, and potter’s field in ancient Rome.” In Death and Disease in the Ancient City. Pp. 128-151.
Scarborough, John. "The classical background of the Vesalian revolution." Episteme 1968 (2):200-218.
French, Roger. "The anatomical tradition." in Companion Encyclopedia of the History of Medicine. v. 1: 81-101.
Park, Katharine. "The life of the corpse: Division and dissection in late medieval Europe." Journal of the History of Medicine 1995 (50): 111-132.
Guerrini, Anita. “Anatomizing the Renaissance.” Early Science and Medicine, 2001, 6(1): 35-38.
Fischer, Klaus-Dietrich Fischer. “Two Latin Pre-Salernitan medical manuals, the Liber passionalis and

the Tereoperica (Ps. Petroncellus)”. Zipser, Barbara. Medical Books in the Byzantine World. Bologna: Eikasmos Online II, 2013. p. 35-56.


Petit, Caroline. “The fate of a Greek medical handbook in the Medieval West: the Introduction, or the Physician ascribed to Galen.” Zipser, Barbara. Medical Books in the Byzantine World. Bologna: Eikasmos Online II, 2013. p. 57-78.
September 13 Friday

Medieval and Renaissance Medicine and Health Care in Western Europe

by Carey Balaban, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, Otolaryngology and Neurobiology
Medicine and Western Civilization. “St. Augustine.” p. 145.
Medicine and Western Civilization. “Jordan of Turre.” p. 209.
Medicine and Western Civilization. “Ulrich von Hutten.” p. 212.
Medicine and Western Civilization. “Arnald of Villanova.” p. 269.

“Female physicians in earlier times.” JAMA, 1890, 15(17): 612.






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