I. Introduction to Department or Program


Any other comments for the Foreign Language program at CWU?



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15. Any other comments for the Foreign Language program at CWU?

The movies that the professors showed to our classes were highly inappropriate and are considered pornographic- I hope this is still not the case.


Japanese courses need to update. New texts new methods would be a great addition (I hear some of these changes are taking place.)
Spend more time learning what fields are offered in the Languages and communicate with Seniors on goals/plans to start a carrier in the field they have majored in.
There needs to be more German available. Dropping the program is a horrible idea, yet it appears that there is no attempt being made to keep the program running. While at CWU, the department lost one of two German professors, and chose to replace him with an ASL professor. That is a mistake. As a high school teacher, I see the popularity returning to German. If you do not offer enough, you will lose many students who wish to minor or even major in German.
I miss you all! For me, working in the foreign language department was an invaluable experience that has propelled me into leadership in the school district in which i work after only one year of full-time employment. the professors always answered my many questions and they worked to find answers to questions that were more challenging or off-based, even. i would go back in a heartbeat!
Russia is in a similar position of economic development that Japan was in 20 years ago. CWU students have the opportunity to become involved in Russia’s economic and political return to the forefront of the global community.
We should promote the Russian program heavily to students who have not yet chosen a major/minor.
Proud to be an alum. Keep it up.

2. Based upon the results from each of the assessment tools listed above:

a. Describe how teaching and learning has been affected.

Our language teaching majors would not be allowed to teach without passing the Praxis examination. The e-portfolios are useful to give students a sampling of their work that is available in one place. We are just implementing the exit surveys and interviews, so there is no compiled data to report. We keep copies of all honors projects in the department in order to provide examples of quality student work and encourage other students to do mentored research with the faculty. The alumni survey is also new this year, so we are not yet able to determine any trends (as we only have one data point).

b. List the strengths of the program’s students.



  • Energy and genuine interest in other cultures

  • Involvement in department-sponsored activities (i.e. World Languages Day, clubs)

c. List the strengths of the program’s alumni.

  • Cultural awareness

  • Written comprehension of language studied

d. List the programmatic learning outcomes that need to be most improved.

  • Critical thinking skills

  • Conversational skills in target language


III. Faculty
A. Faculty profile – Using attached chart show faculty participation for mentoring student research, professional service activities, scholarly activities including grant writing and teaching. (Designate graduate or undergraduate publications or creative activities.) Table on following sheet.
B. Copies of all faculty vitae.
See APPENDIX I.
C. Faculty awards for distinction: instruction, scholarship, and service.
Three of our faculty have been recognized for their excellence in teaching since the last review:
Dr. Natalie Lefkowitz was awarded the Distinguished Professor of Teaching in 2004. This award is based upon an extensive review of an applicant’s teaching activity throughout their career and is accompanied by a generous monetary award.
Dr. Dinara Georgeoliani was awarded the 2007 Non-Tenure Track excellence in teaching award by the College of Arts & Humanities.
In fall of this year, Dr. Eric Mayer was awarded the CWU Alumni Association award for Excellence in Teaching. This award is for assistant professors who are establishing themselves in their profession and is also accompanied by a monetary award.
D. Include in appendices performance standards by department, college and university.
See APPENDIX II.
Tenured and Tenure-track Faculty Profile






2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008













# faculty

TT - T


% of faculty

# faculty

TT - T


% of faculty

# faculty

TT - T


% of faculty

# faculty

TT - T


% of faculty

# faculty

TT - T


% of faculty

5-yr total

Annual avg

% of faculty

* Scholarship Measures: (Use categories applicable to your departmental & college criteria)

Peer reviewed articles

0

0%

2

22%

2

22%

3

33%

2

22%

9

1.80

20%

Books

2

22%

6

66%

4

44%

3

33%

4

44%

19

3.80

42%

Conference presentation

0

0%

1

11%

2

22%

0

0%

3

33%

6

1.20

13%

* Grants: (Use categories applicable to your departmental & college criteria)

External








































Funded / Unfunded








































Internal








































Funded / Unfunded



















1/0

11%

4/0

44%

5

1

11%

* Service measures: (Use categories applicable to your departmental & college criteria)

CWU Committees

7

77%

7

77%

7

77%

7

77%

7

77%

35

7

77%

Community Service

5

55%

5

55%

5

55%

6

66%

7

77%

28

5.6

62%

* Faculty Mentored Research: (Use categories applicable to your departmental & college criteria)

Undergrad projects / SOURCE













1

11%













1

0.2

2%

Graduate Committees – Supervising thesis/projects

1

11%













2

22%







3

0.6

6%

A response to all four main categories is mandatory.

The details to support each category should be applicable to your department & college criteria.
IV. Students – For five years
A. Number of degrees and minors

1. major program(s)



Degree Term

Majors

2002-2003

31

2003-2004

57

2004-2005

45

2005-2006

37

2006-2007

30

Total: 200
2. minor program(s)

Degree Term

Minors

2002-2003

36

2003-2004

42

2004-2005

32

2005-2006

34

2006-2007

60

Total: 204
B. Student accomplishments (include SOURCE, career placement information, etc.). List students working in field; students placed in master’s or doctoral programs.


  • Students working in fields where language expertise is key

    • Teresa Simmons – Missionary in Kazakhstan

    • Curtis Harris – Translator, St. Petersburg

    • And Paschen – Court Interpreter, Washington

    • Daria Goussera – Translator/Computer Analyst, Microsoft

    • Justin Cowgill – Translator, Pravda

    • Olga Blotnis – Translator, Seattle

    • Sam Kuyper – English Teacher, Sanda City, Japan

    • Hyun Shin – U.S. Army, Interpreter

  • JET (Japan English Teaching) Program participants

  • Albert Birch

  • Rich Lee

  • Ariana Maher

  • Dustin Kidd

  • Amanda Eastin

  • Justine Styles

  • Travis Peterson

  • Graduate school enrollees

  • Benjamin Rooney – University of Dusseldorf, MA Japan Studies

  • Bradford Napier – University of Hawaii, Ph.D. Japan Studies

  • Ryan Hallows – Indiana University, MA Linguistics

  • Randall Dills – University of Illinois, Ph.D./ABD

  • Jackie Shelton – University of Oregon, MA

  • Erin Rosenkranz – Arizona State University, MA

  • Albert Miller – Central Washington University, MA

  • William Frank – University of Washington, Ph.D./ABD

  • Jason Dazey – Indiana University, MA

  • Curtis Harris – Central Washington University, MA

  • Kristen Erickson – Central Washington University, MA

  • Paul Baker – Central Washington University, MA

  • Mike Getzinger – Central Washington University, MA


C. Describe departmental policies and advising services for students.
With as many language programs as we have it is imperative that each faculty member participate in the advising of our students. Spanish has such a large number of students comparatively that the advising load is spread out among the tenured/tenure-track Spanish faculty. There have been distribution problems as we usually let the students pick their own advisors, so we are working on either finding a way to more evenly distribute the load or obtain some release time for one faculty member to take all of the Spanish advisees.
Students are expected to meet with their advisor at the beginning of their major/minor coursework and at the end before they graduate. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisors every quarter to discuss degree progress and options for courses for the following term.
D. Describe other student services offered through the department including any professional societies or faculty-led clubs or organizations and their activities.


  • American Sign Language Club: Coffee Chats, Non-Coffee Chats, informational table at Boo Central, Bridges presentations

  • Anime Club: Weekly anime viewing, participation in yearly conference – Sakura Kon – in Seattle, presentations at Bridges and Gear-Up, presentations at World Languages Day, presentation at Heritage College in Toppenish, presentations at International Education Day

  • Chinese Club: Conversation table, cooking activities, Mah Johngg parties

  • German Conversation Table (Stammtisch), German Movie Fridays

  • Japanese Culture Club: Screening of Japanese films, Japanese Cuisine Night

  • La Maison française, La Table française: Conversation Table, French Dinner, screening of French films

  • Russian Club: Russian conversation table

  • Tertulia: Spanish conversation table

  • Living Learning Community: International House – Chinese New Year celebration, screening of foreign films, guest speakers, cooking activities


V. Facilities & Equipment by location (The facilities section is for departments who rely heavily upon laboratory or studio space for instruction.)
Although there has been a laboratory attached to this department for many years – first as an audio-lingual teaching lab, and then as a computer lab - as teaching methodologies have changed to reflect newer and more effective pedagogies and technological infrastructural realities (universal student computer accounts, wireless networks across campus, and on-line homework and practice programs i.e. Quia), its importance to the daily delivery of instruction has decreased to the point that we use it very little.
Since the last review computers, overhead data projectors, and DVD/VHS players have been installed in all classrooms. Also, a wireless network has been installed in this and all buildings on campus that have classrooms used by this department.
VI. Library and Technological Resources by location
A. Describe general and specific requirements for library resources by location, in order to meet its educational and research objectives. Indicate ways in which the present library resources satisfy and do not satisfy these needs.


  1. Describe information literacy proficiencies expected of students at the end of major coursework.

All language programs regularly require students to use computer-based instructional, search, and media programs. Examples of this use include:

  • Students in 400-level literature courses in Spanish must learn to use the Modern Language Association international bibliography database as well as the JSTOR database, for purposes of locating scholarly articles written about the texts read in class.   

  • Japanese language students must learn to use the internet to access Japanese textual sources and web-based glossing and translation programs.

        

1. What instruction in information literacy is provided?

Demonstration of computerized resources, such as online newspapers, radio and television sites, governmental ministry and bureau access pages, language pedagogy sites, and online dictionaries are routinely conducted in most classrooms.



  1. How are these proficiencies assessed?

In order to complete class assignments students must display work that results from the use of information resources, e.g., locating articles in the aforementioned databases according to specific criteria established by the instructor, accessing sources of information only available via specific technologies, manipulating and processing information by means of specific technological resources, etc. This will be assessed with our exit survey.




  1. Describe the information technologies faculty regularly and actively utilize in the classroom.

Now that all of our classrooms are connected to the world wide web, our faculty routinely make use of that resource and the myriad sites that can be used in a language learning environment. Examples of these resources are online newspapers, radio and television sites, governmental ministry and bureau access pages, language pedagogy sites, online dictionaries and others.



D. Describe available technology for teaching and research and its adequacy.
(See C. immediately above)
VII. Analysis of the Review Period
A. What has gone well in the department? Include major accomplishments of the past five years?
We have hired two tenure-track positions in the past five years – one in Chinese and one in Spanish. We have also hired excellent personnel for ASL, Latin, and Spanish non-tenure track positions.
Faculty-led study abroad programs produced by five of our faculty (Mei Chun, Louis Meng, Nathalie Kasselis-Smith, Eric Mayer and Kelton Knight). These programs are popular with our students (feedback and evaluation forms are administered to all participants and the results circulated to the professors and department chair) and provide a very valuable and necessary curricular component to our program offerings. The good work of personnel in the Office of International Studies and Programs is an absolute necessity for these programs to work as smoothly as they do, and we are grateful for it.
Latino and Latin American Studies. Drs. Eric Mayer and Stella Moreno collaborated with Dr. Michael Ervin who was the leader in establishing the Latino and Latin American Studies program in the creation of this new area studies program. Our Spanish faculty contribute not only with the language and literature instruction of the program’s core curriculum, but also with the area studies coursework as well. Our faculty’s participation in this program increases the range of departmental influence throughout the university and the state.
World Languages Day continues to prove itself year-by-year. Enrollment from the public schools has stabilized at 300-350 students divided among 8 campuses spread out over the central and north central portions of Washington state. This activity is not only an opportunity for the high school students who come here, but for the presenters from the university, Ellensburg and larger statewide communities. Last year we had particularly good luck in that our Theatre Arts program put on a Noh play and a comedic Kyogen play – both from the Japanese theatre tradition - which had been translated into English. (The plays were excellent in every way – acting, costuming, direction, etc. – and held the audience spellbound.) World Languages Day may be the 1st and perhaps only opportunity many of these students will be able to see this art form, and many other of the topics presented in that venue.

B. What challenges remain? What new challenges have been identified since the last program review? What has the department done to meet these challenges?
ASL. American Sign Language still enjoys very significant and sustained student demand. Our ability to keep qualified instructors here is the main problem we have dealt with so far. Our community is so small that native “speakers” of ASL are in very short supply. Ready access to the deaf community is necessary to the sustenance of a vibrant program – both for the instructors and their students. With Yakima being about an hour away and Seattle 2 ½ hours (both cities having sizable deaf communities), the 100 +/- students in our program are forced to make do with signing to one another only. Our deaf instructors have experienced a pronounced sense of isolation that has proven very stressful, so stressful that it has had a significant effect on their ability to live and work in Ellensburg.
Single Faculty Language programs. While we are proud of the breadth of our language offerings, in so small a department, the tradeoff we have been forced to make is that four of the languages taught (Chinese, German, Latin, and Russian) have a single faculty member providing instruction and of these four, two are adjunct instructors. This disallows regular curricular offerings and the program stability enjoyed by the other languages with more than one instructor.
C. What resources have been provided in the last 5 years?
The support of the Chinese FTEF line from the provost was a major boost to that program. Key to our obtaining of that support was the initial funding of $90,000 via the Casten Family Foundation as a seed grant. It may behoove us in the future to follow this template in order to fund other programs as well. (Russian, ASL, and Latin.)
Although small in numbers, the Latin courses we have been able to offer have been a positive development for not only this department, but for the college and the university as well. Students from other than the Foreign Languages department who have availed themselves of those classes have come from History, English, the “hard” sciences, philosophy, and more.
D. What recommendations from the previous program review are outstanding?

Creation of an assessment plan – See APPENDIX III.


E. What past recommendations have been implemented that have impacted your program, which haven’t and why?
Cornerstone Program (university credit in the high school classroom in EHS, West Valley, Eisenhower) was one response to the previous reviewer’s recommendation to reach out to the public schools in the surrounding area.
F. Make a comparison between the last program review and where the department is now.

1. How have the advances been supported (internally and/or externally)?

2. Are there outstanding unmet needs identified in the last program review?

The last reviewer suggested that we work towards raising the foreign language requirement for B.A. degrees. The current requirement is two years in high school or one year at the university level. This is also the entrance requirement for the university, so no new foreign language coursework is required of students who took two years in high school. The previous reviewer found this appalling, as does our department. If we could change this requirement, it would increase our enrollments and could possibly be justification for creating new tenure-track lines.


The previous reviewer also identified issues with our visibility on campus. He noted that the administration did not have a clear idea of our role in the campus community. This appears to still be the case and it would financially behoove us to make a clearer statement about our interrelatedness with other disciplines and emphasize the strengths of our degree programs to the administration.
Category VIII. Is the single most important category in the self-study document.
VIII. Future directions
A. Describe the department’s aspirations for the next three to five years.
Create an ongoing and permanent connection with our alumni and develop a database in which we maintain contact information and various data, which can be used to in broadening the constituent base and support network for the department.
Conduct a feasibility study to determine whether Arabic could become a viable part of the department.
Our French professor, who has been with us for over 25 years, is retiring at the end of this year. We would like to keep the tenure-track line open for the French position and intend to do a search for a new faculty member next year (to start the year after that – 2009-2010). Having a new faculty member with new ideas about the program will help to invigorate the French curriculum and keep it current.
Our German professor will also be considering retirement in the next couple years and we need to sit down as a department and discuss how that position should be filled.
Stabilize and better integrate ASL into Foreign Languages programming.
B. In this context, describe ways the department or unit might increase quality, quantity, and/or efficiency. Provide evidence that supports the promise for outstanding performance.
We would like to regularize Latin. One way that we propose to do this is in the next couple hires to find someone with multiple language capabilities (i.e. French and Latin, or Spanish and Latin). If we could do this, we could possibly offer two years of Latin instead of just the one we are only able to offer presently.
One way we could better serve our students is to be better advisors. To this end, we would like to coordinate advising seminars for our faculty so that they are all better informed and more capable of providing students with the correct information (this has been somewhat problematic in the past). This will help with the retention and overall happiness of the students.
Another focus of the department should be fundraising and recruitment. Our enrollment has been down and it would be beneficial to all of our programs to work on strategies to attract and retain students. One way to do this is to continue to support and expand World Languages Day. Another way is to get more involved with area high schools with programs such as the Cornerstone program.
Lastly, we would like to work on maintaining relationships with alumni. We would like to create an online forum for communication with alumni – such as an online newsletter or email correspondence. This will provide a long term (and long overdue) connection with our past students.
C. What resources would the department need to pursue these future directions?
Again, it all comes down to money. We need to work on grant writing – for both internal and external grants - and soliciting funds from former students. Increasing our contact and visibility with the alumni will hopefully help with this.
D. What do you want us to know that is not included in this self-study.


IX. Suggestions for the program review process or contents of the self-study?

APPENDIX I: Curriculum vita for Foreign Languages Department faculty

CURRICULUM VITAE OF RODNEY BRANSDORFER
I. PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATION AND CONTACT INFORMATION

A. Present University Department or Unit:

Central Washington University, Foreign Languages Department

B. Office Address:

400 E. University Way, MS 7552,

Ellensburg, WA 98926-7552.

rodneyb@cwu.edu
II. EDUCATION

Ph.D., Spanish Linguistics/Second Language Acquisition, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dissertation: Communicative Value and Linguistic Knowledge in Oral Input Processing, Director: Professor Bill VanPatten, 1991.

M.A., Hispanic Linguistics, The University of Texas at Austin, Thesis: The Acquisition of Phonology by Adults in the Foreign Language Classroom, Director: Professor Joseph Matluck, 1986.

B.A.,Spanish Language and Literature, Michigan State University, 1983.

B.A.Cultural Anthropology, Michigan State University, 1982.
III. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Associate Professor of Spanish, Central Washington University, Promoted 2001.

Assistant Professor of Spanish, Central Washington University, 1995 – 2001.

Adjunct Graduate Faculty, University of Southern Mississippi at Morelia, Mexico, Summers 1996 – 2000.

Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish, Gustavus Adolphus College, 1994 – 1995.

Visiting Lecturer/Graduate Student Coordinator, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1993 – 1994.

Assistant Professor of Spanish, Purdue University, 1991 – 1993.
IV. TEACHING EXPERIENCE

A. Teaching Interests and Specialties:

Spanish Language.

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

Second Language Acquisition.

Foreign Language Teaching Methods.


B. Teaching and Training Grants:

C. Teaching Awards and Honors:

D. Current Graduate Faculty Status:

Active


E. Number of Master Committees on which you have served: 3

F. Names of Students who have completed Master’s Theses under your direction:

G. Courses Taught:

At Central Washington University:



Elementary Spanish I (Spanish 151)

Elementary Spanish II (Spanish 152)

Elementary Spanish III (Spanish 153)

Intensive Review of First Year Spanish (Spanish 181)

Intensive First-Year Spanish (151, 152 & 153)

Intermediate Composition and Grammar I (Spanish 341)

Intermediate Composition and Grammar II (Spanish 342)

Intermediate Conversation (Spanish 343)

Intermediate Conversation II (Spanish 344)

Spanish for Spanish Speakers (Spanish 345)

Spanish Phonetics (Spanish 385)

Advanced Grammar (Spanish 431)

Advanced Spanish Grammar & Composition (Spanish 441)

Advanced Spanish Grammar (Spanish 460)

Foreign Language Teaching Methods and Materials (FNLA 481)

Foreign Language Acquisition (FNLA 482)

Teaching Practicum (FNLA 492)

At the University of Southern Mississippi (Graduate courses):

Pedagogical Grammar

Task-Based Instruction in Second and Foreign Languages

Applied Linguistics in Second and Foreign Languages

Second Language Acquisition Theory and Practice

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

At Gustavus Adolphus College:

First Year Spanish

Spanish Composition

At the University of Illinois, Chicago (Graduate courses):

Teaching of Spanish

Spanish Applied Linguistics

At Purdue University:




Graduate Level:




Teaching of Spanish




Spanish morpho-syntax




Seminar in Second Language Acquisition




Seminar in Classroom Language Acquisition

Undergraduate Level:







First Semester Spanish (101)




Second Semester Spanish (102)




Third Semester Spanish (201)

H. Other:



V. SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY

A. Interests and Specialties:

Second/Foreign Language Acquisition

Second/Foreign Language Pedagogy

Foreign Language Materials Development

B. Current Projects:

Spanish Placement Exam

First-year Spanish online program

Acquisition of Spanish /b/ /d/ /g/ occlusive/fricative rules

C. Publications:

Books:

Bretz, M.L., Dvorak, T., Kirschner, C., & Bransdorfer, R. Pasajes: Lengua 6th Ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2006.

Lee, J., Young, D, Bransdorfer, R., & Wolf, D. ¿Qué te parece? Intermediate Spanish, 3rd Ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005.

Bretz, M. L., Dvorak, T., Kirschner, C., Bransdorfer, R. & Kihyet, C. ¡Avance!: Intermediate Spanish. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2004.

Bretz, M.L., Dvorak, T., Kirschner, C., & Bransdorfer, R. & Kihyet, C. ¡Avance! Intermediate Spanish. Cuaderno de práctica. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2004.

Bretz, M. L., Dvorak, T., Kirschner, C. & Bransdorfer, R. Pasajes: Lengua 5th Ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2002.

Bretz, M. L., Dvorak, T., Kirschner, C. & Bransdorfer, R. Workbook and Lab Manual to accompany Pasajes: Lengua 5th Ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2002.

Lee, J., Bransdorfer, R., Young, D., & Chandler, P. Manual que acompaña ¿Qué te parece? 2nd Ed. Volume I and II. New York: McGraw Hill, 2000.

Lee, J., Bransdorfer, R., Young, D., Wolf, D. & Chandler, P. Manual que acompaña ¿Qué te parece?. Volume I and II. New York: McGraw Hill, 1996.

Journal Articles:

Book Chapters:

Book Reviews:



Designing Language Teaching Tasks by K. Johnson, Studies in Second Language Acquisition, Vol 22, No. 3, 2004.

Lexical Phrases and Language Teaching by J. Nattinger and J. DeCarrico, Studies in Second Language Acquisition, Vol. 16, No. 2, 1994.

Conference Papers and Presentations:



Classroom Activities with Purpose: Task-Based Instruction for the Rest of Us. Paper presented at the annual meeting of RMMLA, Santa Fe, NM, 1999.




Back to Basics Computer Graphics: Putting Pictures in Your Documents. Paper presented at the annual meeting of PNCFL, Eugene, OR, 1997.

Recall Patterns of an Orally Presented L2 Narrative: What Do Listeners Recall? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (AATSP), Phoenix, AZ, 1993.

The First Year Out: Transition from Student to Professor. Invited presentation for Department of Spanish, Italian, & Portuguese, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1993.

On Applying Applied Linguistic Research: New Directions in the Learning and Teaching of Foreign Languages. Paper presented at Faculty Colloquium, Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, Purdue University, 1992.

On the Role of Linguistic Knowledge in Input Processing: A Study of the Spanish Copula Estar. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (AATSP), Cancún, Mexico, 1992.

Testing the Role of Communicative Value in Input Processing. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association For Applied Linguistics (AAAL), Seattle, WA, 1992.

Two Factors in Second Language Input Processing. Paper presented at Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, 1991.

Processing Function Words in Input: Does Meaning Make a Difference? Presented at:

Second Conference on Second Language Acquisition and Foreign Language Learning (SLA-FLL II), University of Illinois, 1990.

Second Language Research Forum (SLRF), University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, 1990.

Annual meeting of American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (AATSP), San Antonio, TX, 1989.

Second Annual SIP SLATE Colloquium, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1989.

The effects of grammatical and lexical abilities on foreign language reading. Paper presented at the SIP SLATE Colloquium, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1988.

Editorial Work:

Creative Works:


  1. Grants Applied For:

CAH Travel Grant, 1999.

CWU Alumni Foundation Grant, 1997.



  1. Grants Received:

CAH Travel Grant, 1999.

CWU Alumni Foundation Grant, 1997.




  1. Honors and Awards:

Merit Award Level 1 and 2, 2004 – 2005.

Merit Award Level 1 and 2, 2003 – 2004.

Merit Award Level 1 and 2, 2002 - 2003.

Merit Award Level 1 and 2, 2000 - 2001.

Merit Award Level 1 and 2, 1997 – 1998.

Invited Guest of Honor, Student Support Services Recognition Dinner, 2000.




  1. Other:

Nuevos Destinos, 2nd Ed. Annotated Teacher’s Edition. Authored annotations of second-year Spanish program for the college level. McGraw Hill, 2003.

CD-ROM to accompany Pasajes: Lengua 5th Ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2003.

Destinos Alternate Edition, 2nd Ed. Annotated Teacher’s Edition. Co-authored (Bransdorfer, R. & Lefkowitz, N.) annotations of first-year Spanish program for the college level. McGraw Hill, 2002.

Nuevos Destinos, Annotated Teacher’s Edition. Authored annotations of second-year Spanish program for the college level. McGraw Hill, 1998.

Destinos Alternate Edition, Annotated Teacher’s Edition. Co-authored (Bransdorfer, R. & Lefkowitz, N.) annotations of first-year Spanish program for the college level. McGraw Hill, 1996.

"Two Factors in Second Language Input Processing." Proceedings of the Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, 1992.



VI. UNIVERSITY SERVICE

  1. University

Chair – Faculty Senate Curriculum Committee, Central Washington University, 2005 – 2006, 2006 - 2007.

Member – International Studies and Programs Advisory Committee, Central Washington University, 2003 – 2004.

Member – Faculty Senate Curriculum Committee. Central Washington University, 2003 – 2005.

CWU General Education Advisor, 1997 – Present.

Secretary - University Computing Committee. Central Washington University, 1997 – 2000.

Leonard Thayer Small Grants Committee (Formerly known as the Alumni Foundation Small Grant Committee). Central Washington University, 1997 – 2000.


  1. Faculty Senate

Curriculum Committee Representative to Faculty Senate, 2005 – 2006, 2006 – 2007.

Alternate Foreign Language Department Senator to Faculty Senate, 2001 – Present.

  1. College

Member – CAH Promotion, Tenure & Retention Committee, Central Washington University, Spring 2006.

  1. Department

NCATE Accreditation Coordinator for Foreign Languages, 2006 – 2007.

Member – Foreign Language Department Web Site Committee, Central Washington University, 2005 – 2006.

Chair – Search Committee for Position in Spanish, Department of Foreign Languages, Central Washington University, 2003.

Member – Search Committee for Position in American Sign Language. Department of Foreign Languages, Central Washington University, 2003.

Chair –Curriculum Committee, Department of Foreign Languages, Central Washington University, 2003 – Present.

Chair – Search Committee for Position in American Sign Language. Department of Foreign Languages, Central Washington University, 2000 – 2001.

Chair - Department of Foreign Languages Scholarship Committee. Central Washington University, 1997 – Present.

Member – Department of Foreign Languages Personnel Committee. Central Washington University, 1995 – Present.

Foreign Languages Department Representative at CWU Open House, 2006.

Foreign Languages Department Representative at CWU Open House, 2003.

Create and maintain Department of Foreign Languages’ Advising Database, 1999 – 2006.

Create, maintain and publish Department of Foreign Languages’ Web Site, 1998 – 2004.

Create, maintain and publish Department of Foreign Languages’ Student Handbook, 1995 – 2005.

Foreign Languages Department Representative at CWU Open House, 2000.

Foreign Languages Department Representative at Competency-Based Admissions Standards Project for HEC Board in Burrien, WA, 1999.

Foreign Languages Department Representative at CWU Academic Social, 1999.

NCATE Accreditation Review Panel, 1999.

Foreign Languages Department Representative at CWU Academic Department Fair, 1996.



  1. Other:



VII. PROFESSIONAL SERVICE

A. Membership in Professional Associations:



American Association of Teachers of Spanish & Portuguese (AATSP)

American Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL)

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL)

Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association (RMMLA)

Pacific Northwest Council on Foreign Languages (PNCFL)

Washington Association of Foreign Language Teachers (WAFLT)
B. Offices Held and Honors Awarded in Professional Associations:

Section Chair. Continuing Session on Acquisition of Spanish as First or Second Language, Annual meeting of American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese, San Diego, 1995.

Secretary. Continuing Session on Acquisition of Spanish as First or Second Language, Annual Meeting of American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese, Philadelphia, 1994.

Co-chair and principle organizer. Third conference on Second Language Acquisition and Foreign Language Learning (SLA-FLL III). Purdue University, 1993.

Session Chair. Spanish Linguistics session at Purdue University Romance Languages Conference, 1992.

Selection Committee for Presenters at Second conference on Second Language Acquisition and Foreign Language Learning (SLA-FLL II). University of Illinois, 1990.

C. Consultantships:



Inservice training of graduate student teaching assistants at the Univeristy of Puget Sound, 2005.

Inservice training of graduate student teaching assistants at the Michigan State University, 2006.

Inservice training of graduate student teaching assistants at the Univeristy of California – Santa Barbara, 2007.

Consultant to ongoing project to create World Wide Web sites to accompany the first and second-year Spanish textbooks for McGraw Hill. Contributed lists of internet links, interactive online activities, review activities, and online quizzes, 1997 – Present.
D: Evaluation of Manuscripts for Journals and Books Publishers and of Grant Proposals for Agencies:

Journal article/Book reviewer for Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1993 – Present.

Journal article reviewer for Modern Language Journal, 1994 – Present.

Journal article reviewer for Hispania, 1994 – Present.
E. Papers and Presentations at Professional Meetings (other than those listed under “Scholarly Activity”)

F. Other:


VIII. COMMUNITY SERVICE

CURRICULUM VITAE

MEI, CHUN 梅春





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