Navy sbir fy10. 1 Proposal submission instructions



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DESCRIPTION: The US Navy is pursuing the development of an electromagnetic launcher (also known as a rail gun) for long range naval surface fire support. An electromagnetic launcher consists of two parallel electrical conductors, called rails, and a moving element, called the armature. Current is passed down one rail, through the armature, and back through the other rail. The armature is accelerated down the barrel due to the interaction between this magnetic field and current flow (Lorentz Force). An electromagnetic rail gun (EMRG) system will accelerate projectiles to hypersonic speeds, enabling ranges beyond 200 NM in less than 6 minutes of flight time while traversing the atmospheric spectrum (endo-exo-endo). The EMRG can address time-critical targets with a rate-of-fire of 6 to 10 rounds per minute while residual energy at target impact provides lethal effects. This operation occurs in an environment consisting of strong magnetic fields, high temperatures, chemical interactions and strong lateral forces on the rails and armature in the launcher bore.
A pair of electrically conductive rails act to transfer the power supply current down their length and through the moving armature creating an accelerating Lorentz force. These rails also provide lateral guidance to the armature. The face of this rail material must be able to withstand the severe mechanical, electrical, and thermal environment present in the bore of a high power electromagnetic launcher. This surface must be able to survive sliding electrical contact of an aluminum armature and polymer bore rider materials at velocities up to 2.5 km/sec, and possibly concurrent balloting loads. In order to survive these conditions, the rail material must be electrically conductive to high currents approaching 6 MA, resistant to high transient temperatures, possess high hardness and yield strength and retain these properties after thermal transients, must accommodate balloting loads, and survive exposure to molten armature metals. The material is required to resist thermal breakdown and interaction in the presence of plasma due to high current electrical arcing and shocked gas. The material must eventually be manufacturable as well as affordable for these dimensions. Alternatively, potential protective layers may be considered such as bonded claddings, jackets, surface coatings or treatments. For purposes of managing electrical current distribution and mechanical stresses, approaches that permit grading of material properties such as electrical conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, elastic modulus near the sliding surface would be particularly attractive.
PHASE I: Develop a rail material/coating and process approach to manufacture electrically conductive bore materials. Conduct any necessary subscale tests needed to show that the proposed process is suitable for Phase II demonstration. Create sample rail coupons for static or small scale testing and verification, such as strength, erosion resistance, and conductivity versus temperature from ambient to 500 degrees C.
PHASE II: Produce samples of electrically conductive rail materials of at least 1 m length that meet the needs of the EM launcher environment. Demonstrate that the material provides the required material property characteristics described above. Further develop and demonstrate the fabrication or joining processes for creating longer sections. Also demonstrate fabrication technology to create non-planar contact surfaces facing the bore. Produce a prototype set of coupons 1 m long and of full rail cross section, for testing in a small scale EM launcher. The EM launcher test facility may be provided as government furnished asset, or via a teaming relationship with other EM launcher test sites. Potential test sites include various scale railguns operated by Universities and Defense contractors. The results of testing may be classified. The Phase II product may become classified.
PHASE III: Develop process for full length (7-12 meters) rails with final design dimensions in other axes. The materials process developed by the Phase II effort will be applied to Navy railgun proof of concept demonstration and design efforts in the lab as well as industry advanced barrel contractors. Successful rail materials solutions will be installed in a weapon system on board ship upon transition to PEO IWS, PMS 405, ONR Program Office and integration with industry launcher manufacturers' production weapon systems that will be sent to the fleet.
PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The materials and processes developed could be applied to any electro-mechanical applications particularly under conditions of high heat, stress, and/or current requiring both the beneficial thermal and high current aspects of conducting metals combined with the need for higher toughness and hardness with traceability to relatively long sections. Example applications could be high-speed mag-lev contacts, electrical generation facilities, high current switches and sections for re-entry protection of space-craft.
REFERENCES:

1. Stefani, F.; Parker, J.V., "Experiments to measure gouging threshold velocity for various metals against copper," Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on , vol. 35, no.1, pp.312-316, Jan 1999.


2. Gee, R.M.; Persad, C., "The response of different copper alloys as rail contacts at the breech of an electromagnetic launcher," Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on , vol. 37, no.1, pp.263-268, Jan 2001.
3. Wolfe, T.; Spiegelberg, W.; Evangelist, M., "Exploratory metallurgical evaluation of worn rails from a 90 mm electromagnetic railgun," Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on , vol. 31, no.1, pp.770-775, Jan 1995.
4. Holland, M.M.; Eggers, P.D.; Guinto, S.; Stevenson, R.D.; Columbo, G., "Advanced railgun experimental test results and implications for the future," Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on , vol. 29, no.1, pp.419-424, Jan 1993.
5. Jackson, G.; Farris, L.; Tower, M., "Electromagnetic railgun extended-life bore material tests results," Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on , vol. 22, no.6, pp. 1542-1545, Nov 1986.
6. Newman Newman, D.C.; Bauer, D.P.; Wahrer, D.; Knoth, E., "A maintainable large bore, high performance railgun barrel," Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on , vol. 31, no.1, pp.344-347, Jan 1995.
7. Hurn, T.W.; D'Aoust, J.; Sevier, L.; Johnson, R.; Wesley, J., "Development of an advanced electromagnetic gun barrel," Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on , vol. 29, no.1, pp.837-842, Jan 1993.
KEYWORDS: railgun; rail; electromagnetic; conductor; wear; launcher

N101-087 TITLE: Counter Directed Energy Weapons (C- DEW)


TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors, Battlespace, Weapons
ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Navy Counter-Directed Energy Research S&T Program (ONR 35)
RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports): This topic is "ITAR Restricted." The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data. Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this SBIR is to advance the state-of the-art of counter directed energy weapons technologies and develop countermeasures for high energy lasers and/or high power microwave weapons systems in the future. Specifically, this SBIR seeks to develop specific items for a U.S. Navy weapon system, or systems, to improve their survivability characteristics and maintain established performance capabilities when attacked by High Energy, Directed Energy Weapons (DEW), with minimal cost or system impacts.
DESCRIPTION: With improved performance in both high energy lasers (HEL) and High Power Microwaves, the susceptibility of weapons systems and their sensors used in seekers or targeting system are seen as potentially degraded in a war fighting environment when impacted with DEW effects. Recent interest in protection of Unmanned Aircraft Vehicles (UAV) and their sensor suites is of particular interest. As are similarly, manned systems where performance may be degraded due to concerns or encounters with threat Directed Energy Weapons. Existing protection solutions are often taken on a case by case basis, and not cost effective or easily replicated/produced. In some cases, a limited capability may service many military requirements as well as service many commercial protection requirements – such as eye protection for laser welding systems or for sensors used in various reproduction industries. Therefore, innovations in small, lightweight, and efficient packaging for sensor protection (or electrical protection schemes for radar systems) that has a commercial analog or application is highly desirable.
Specifications for such an application are as follows:

• Low cost to manufacture in small quantities: (goal) Less than $10,000 per unit in lots of tens (maximum) Less than $100,000 per unit in lots of one hundred.

• Operating temperature: (goal) >40 deg. C, (minimum) 25 deg. C

• Package size: (goal) < 15 cubic inches, (maximum) 30 cubic inches

• Low time to install: (goal) None, (maximum) Less than 1 day/unit

• Cooling: (goal) none, (possibly) conductively cooled by air-, or water-cooled heat exchanger



• Power Consumption: (goal) none
RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports): This topic is "ITAR Restricted." The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data. Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.
PHASE I: In Phase I of this effort the contractor shall assess the various approaches identified for their specific proposal on Counter DEW Techniques. They will provide a trade analysis on the costs and benefits of these approaches relative to size, weight, efficiency, cooling requirements, production potential and cost. Based upon the findings of the trade study, a detailed design for such a device with performance projections shall be developed. The design must describe the techniques used to mate the proposed system into the weapon and show expectations for performance, as well as the cost impact of the solution when compared to the “all up round production cost” (AURPC) compared to an unimproved weapons system. In general, cost goal increases of less than 2% are encouraged per AURPC in order to enable transition to an acquisition program office.
Trend analysis and projections will be presented against generic commercially available systems whenever possible. However, the technology within this topic is often restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals, their country of origin, and what tasks each would accomplish in their statement of work.
PHASE II: In Phase II of this effort the contractor shall build a suitable number of prototype devices to allow for experimentation and demonstration. A demonstration of the developed devices must show that the specified minimum requirements, specifically for spectral and spatial properties, are either met or exceeded. Depending on the application, the effort may make several, or only a few prototypes to prove and test the effectiveness of various techniques used.
In some cases, the development of a material countermeasure or counter-technique may require access to classified information, and therefore may become classified in Phase II. In those cases, an establishment of a "need to know" and a suitable Department of Defense, Contract Security Classification Specification, Form DD254, will be executed. This is not required in every case, but may be required in certain circumstances.
Though Phase II work may become classified, the proposal for Phase II work will be submitted as UNCLASSIFIED only. If the selected Phase II contractor does not have the required certification for classified work, the Navy program office will work with the contractor to facilitate certification of related personnel and facility.
PHASE III: In Phase III, the contractor shall work with the government to conduct a low rate production study on a specific design or designs as of the developed solution set, possibly using representative DEW systems intended to defeat weapons systems at tens of kilometers.
In some cases, the development of a material countermeasure or counter-technique may require access to classified information, and therefore the Phase III effort may become classified. In those cases, an establishment of a "need to know" and a suitable Department of Defense, Contract Security Classification Specification, Form DD254, will be executed.
PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Laser eye safety and HPM protection systems are required for numerous civil and commercial applications including telecommunications. This work is currently performed with eye hazardous laser sources, which force operators to either fly at altitudes that keep the eye hazard to a minimum or use bulky and expensive protection for electronics, such as flight avionics. A compact protection capability for safely working around high energy laser sources or high power microwaves would positively impact this business area.
REFERENCES:

1. Journal of Directed Energy, available from the Directed Energy Professional Society, (http://www.deps.org/DEPSpages/DEjournal.html )


2. Laser Weapons: The Dawn of a New Military Age. Anderberg, Bengt and Myron L. Wolbarsht. New York, N.Y.: Plenum Press, 1992. Call Number: UG 486 .A53 1992
3. “Laser Illumination in the Cockpit: prank or terrorism?” Connor, C. W. , Aviation Security International 11, no. 1 (February 2005): 8-12
4. “The Laser Threat.” Fetzer, Barry R., Marine Corps Gazette 76, no. 10 (October 1992): 66-67.
5. Jane’s Unconventional Weapons Response Handbook. Sullivan, John P. et al. (See sections on Lasers)
6. High Energy Laser (HEL) Lethality Data Collection Standards; Jorge Beraun, Charles LaMar, J. Thomas Schriempf, Robert Cozzens, William Laughlin, David Loomis, Barry Price, Ralph Rudder, and Craig Walters; Directed Energy Professional Society, Albuquerque, New Mexico (2007)
7. High Power Microwaves, Second Edition ; James Benford, Edl Schamiloglu; CRC Press, New York (2007), ISBN-13: 9780750307062
8. Proceedings, Seventh Annual Directed Energy Test and Evaluation Conference,available from the Directed Energy Professional Society, (http://www.deps.org/DEPSpages/DEjournal.html ) Albuquerque, NM, 2008
KEYWORDS: Lasers; High Energy Lasers; HEL; Laser Protection; High Power Microwave; HPM; Directed Energy

N101-088 TITLE: Alternative Energy Systems and High Efficiency Water Purification Systems for



Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief Operations, and Expeditionary Operations
TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes
ACQUISITION PROGRAM: MARFORPAC POC: Mr. Donn Murakami, 808-477-8909.
OBJECTIVE: Develop a 5 – 50 kWe alternative/renewable energy system and/or an efficient 200 gallons per day (gpd) water purification system capable of being easily transported and made operational by four (4) people within 2 hours. The systems may be individual stand alone systems or a common system.
DESCRIPTION: Develop a power system and a water purification system – separately or combined – that uses an alternative/renewable energy source (e.g., solar, wind, hydro, current, etc.) vice a logistics (petroleum, bio-fuel, blends, etc) fueled energy source. Either a power systems or a water purification system may be proposed. Alternatively, a combined capability system may be proposed. Both systems must be efficient, modularly expandable in the field and capable of being assembled and made operational within a 4 hour period by no more than four (4) people. The power system will produce a minimum of 5kWe expandable to 50kWe at design ratings. Individual power system modules should weigh no more than 80 lbs (including packaging), should integrate packaging with the renewable power source if possible (to avoid loss upon deployment), be ruggedized for transport, and facilitate rapid deployment.
The metrics for the water purification system will be based on a scaled down version of the Marine Corps/Army Lightweight Water Purifier, though there is no requirement for reverse osmosis to be used. The unit must be capable of treating any source water including seawater (to 60,000 ppm TDS), brackish, turbid, and NBC-contaminated sources. The unit should have higher productivity or efficiency for fresh water compared to seawater. The unit should be lightweight weighing less than 1 pound per gallon per day production capacity based on seawater and should ship with <10 cubic foot of volume. The unit should not use more than 6 kW-hr per 200 gallons of product water from seawater. The unit should require minimal technical expertise to operate. Product water should be to EPA National Primary Drinking Water Regulations drinking water standards.
The complete power system or the complete water system, or a complete combination system must be capable of being transported in a standard military vehicle/truck or air-lifted by an H-53 type helicopter.
PHASE I: For the power system, conduct a proof of concept demonstration using selected alternative renewable energy source(s). Establish the conversion efficiency at the device and overall system level. The developer must identify the IEEE, ASTM, NEMA and/or other relevant standards the system is being designed to meet. Develop system schematics with volumetric, weight and cost estimates for a complete system.
For the water purification system, a proof of concept breadboard unit should be constructed that desalinates seawater (35,000 ppm TDS) to less than 500 ppm TDS and in fresh water mode treats source water to 15-minute silt density index values (ASTM D4189-07) of less than 3.0 and turbidity values less than 1.0 NTU while showing a pathway to meet the weight, volume, and energy metrics. Novel approaches or approaches integrated with novel power sources should be developed and tested to a level where the technical feasibility to meet program metrics under a phase II is demonstrated.
PHASE II: For the power system, develop a full scale prototype using the selected energy source(s) and conduct a 168 hour continuous test without a significant failure (one that requires replacement of a major/critical element). Measure the conversion efficiency at the device and overall system level. The power output and power quality must meet the appropriate IEEE standards. Develop detailed system drawings and volumetric, weight and cost estimates for a complete system. Prepare a transport plan with erection/assembly details, and an operational guide.
For the water purification system, a robust prototype unit should be constructed that desalinates seawater (35,000 ppm TDS) to less than 500 ppm TDS and in fresh water mode treats source water to 15-minute silt density index values (ASTM D4189-07) of less than 3.0 and turbidity values less than 1.0 NTU while meeting the weight, volume, and energy metrics. The product water should meet EPA National Primary Drinking Water Regulations with disinfection.
Develop detailed system drawings and volumetric, weight and cost estimates for a complete system. Prepare a transport plan with erection/assembly details, and an operational guide. For a combined system the same demonstrations are required.
PHASE III: The contractor will prepare complete system and user-documentation. It is expected that a successful result will be relied upon to support deployed forces during a joint or international operational exercise to fully demonstrate the capability of the system.
PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The energy system and the water purification system are directly applicable to civilian disaster relief efforts and other civilian short term remote location applications.
REFERENCES:

1. EPA National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, (http://www.epa.gov/safewater/contaminants/index.html#listmcl)


2. IEEE Standards (http://www.ieee.org)
KEYWORDS: alternative energy; renewable energy; distributed power systems; water purification;

N101-089 TITLE: Light Weight Coastal Topographic/ Bathymetric Charting System for Naval



Unmanned Airborne Vehicles
TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Sensors, Battlespace
ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PEO C4I/PMW-120 Future MetOc Capabilities
OBJECTIVE: Design and build an autonomous hydrographic charting, terrain and urban area mapping system that can be accommodated within the payload and operational limitations of a Tier II UAV, with equal or better capabilities to the current manned Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) system.
DESCRIPTION: The need is to employ new technologies in signal processing chip size and processing power, lidar tranceivers, hyperspectral focal plane arrays and related technologies to reduce size, weight, and power (SWAP) of DoD hydrographic mapping systems. The current aircraft-based precision hydrographic charting, terrain and urban area mapping technologies require manned operation and the payload capacity of a C-12 sized aircraft. Designing a new system that could be carried by a Tier II unmanned aircraft platform in the Navy inventory, such as the Scan Eagle UAS would allow the system to operate in conditions not supportable by the current capability. This will require S&T development to significantly miniaturize the topographic/hydrographic LiDAR, power, navigation, and processing systems. See References below and http://shoals.sam.usace.army.mil/Charts.aspx for technical specifications of the fielded system.
The new system should be capable of collecting hydrographic and topographic data in a single mission with data point ground spacing no larger than 4-meters by 4-meters in a variety of water clarity conditions and bottom types. The ability to interface with organic Tactical Control Stations (TCS) is needed as well as the ability to retrieve and rapidly process collected data post flight or in real-time to the TCS, although these would be requirements for Phase III development or beyond. The hydrographic/topographic system should either provide its own precise navigation and attitude capability or have the ability to utilize organic systems onboard the UAS.
PHASE I: Develop overall system design that includes specification of remote sensing approach and enabling technologies for the required digital terrain elevation and bathymetric retrievals, sensor engineering specification to meet the payload restrictions of the Naval Tier II UAS, and general protocols for operation and environments where the proposed solution will be valid.
PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate a prototype system in a realistic environment to include autonomous operation of the sensor and size/weight/power within payload specifications of expected operational platform. Conduct testing in coastal environments to prove feasibility over extended operating conditions and resulting data retrievals to compare with ground truth survey data. This testing should be compliant with UAS specifications and Interface Control Documents but may be conducted by a contract aircraft or other contractor provided platform.

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