Professor Fleming Case Project 1



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Altaf


Hamza Altaf

CSC246


Professor Fleming

Case Project 1


A license is an agreement through which a licensee leases the rights to a legally protected piece of intellectual property from a licensor the entity which owns or represents the property for use in conjunction with a product or service. Licensable properties come from a variety of sources. The definitions of various property types are not always clear, and they often overlap. Although every licensing program is unique, different areas of the licensing business have specific patterns in terms of how they are organized and how business is done. a strong licensing relationship brings benefits to all parties to the deal – property owners and their agents, licensees and their affiliates, retailers and, ultimately, consumers, each of those parties has its own goals and aims that ultimately adds value to the final product or service.

A license is an arrangement where a licensee leases a licensor's rights to a lawfully secured piece of intellectual property to an individual that owns or represents the property for use in connection with a product or service. Assets that are licensable come from several outlets. The meanings of different categories of property are not necessarily obvious, and they also overlap. While every licensing program is new, there are clear trends in various aspects of the licensing industry in terms of how they are organized and how business is conducted. A good licensing agreement helps all parties to the deal-property owners and their agents, licensees and their affiliates, dealers and, essentially, customers-each of those parties has their own priorities and expectations that ultimately add value to the finished product or service.
The GNU General Public License is a free, copyleft license for software.

The licenses for most software and other practical works are designed to take away your freedom to share and change the works. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change all versions of a program--to make sure it remains free software for all its users. To protect your rights, we need to prevent others from denying you these rights or asking you to surrender the rights. The GNU General Public License is a copyleft-free software license. . Therefore, you have certain responsibilities if you distribute copies of the software, or if you modify it: responsibilities to respect the freedom of others. For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you must pass on to the recipients the same freedoms that you received.

The licenses for most software and other functional works are meant to strip away the right to distribute and modify works. The GNU General Public License, on the other hand, is designed to protect your right to distribute and alter all versions of the program—to ensure that it remains free software for all its users. We ought to discourage anyone from denying you these rights or forcing you to forfeit your freedom to protect your rights. Therefore, whether you share versions of the program, or if you change it, you have such responsibilities: duties to protect others' rights. For eg, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether for free or for a charge, you must carry on the same privileges you have gained to the users You must make sure that they, too, receive or can get the source code. And you must show them these terms, so they know their rights.
Open-source software is software with source code that anyone can inspect, modify, and enhance.

"Source code" is the part of software that most computer users do not ever see; it is the code computer programmers can manipulate to change how a piece of software a "program" or "application" works. Programmers who have access to a computer program's source code can improve that program by adding features to it or fixing parts that do not always work correctly. Open-source software is different. Its authors make its source code available to others who would like to view that code, copy it, learn from it, alter it, or share it. LibreOffice and the GNU Image Manipulation Program are examples of open-source software.

Open-source software (OSS) is software for which the source code is viewable and changeable by the public, or otherwise open. "Source code" is the part of software that most computer users never see; it is the code that can be exploited by computer programmers to modify how a "program" or "application" piece of software functions. However, it doesn’t mean open-source software is 100% legal of course you can modify it and see an open-source software but you have to be careful that commercial is not the same as proprietary and others can take advantage of your software that you developed and enhance it to make off your hard work
Some software has source code that only the person, team, or organization who created it—and maintains exclusive control over it—can modify. People call this kind of software "proprietary" or "closed source" software. Closed source software can be defined as proprietary software distributed under a licensing agreement to authorized users with private modification, copying, and republishing restrictions, the source code is not shared with the public for anyone to look at or change. Closed source is the sort of arrangement that you would expect from most businesses, protective of their product and keen to maintain control over their brand and the user experience offered to their customers. Think Apple rather than Android.
Freeware is cost-free software and copyright-free software is free software. In other words, freeware is proprietary software, but free software is software that has no restrictions or limitations but may not be free in the sense that it does not have a price added to it. It is possible to alter and change free software at the user's will. This ensures that the user can make improvements to the program's key components, re-write whatever they choose, overwrite stuff, repurpose the program entirely, fork it into new applications, etc. Freeware also exists to market the commercial applications of a developer. Typically, this is achieved by handing out a version with features that are identical but limited for instance it might have some features hidden or locked by the license provider

Freeware is cost-free software and free software is copyright-free software. In other words, freeware is software under copyright but available at no cost, free software is software with no limitations or constraints but might not be free in the sense that there is no price attached to it. Free software can be modified and changed at the will of the user. This means that the user can make changes to the core elements of the program, re-write whatever they want, overwrite things, completely repurpose the program, fork it into new software, etc. Freeware often exists to advertise a developer's commercial software. This is usually done by giving out a version with similar but limited features. For example, this edition might have advertisements, or some features might be locked down until a license is provided


Shareware is commercial software that is distributed free to users, eventually either requiring or encouraging users to pay for the continued support of the software. Shareware is software that is available at no cost and is meant to be shared with others to promote the program, but unlike freeware, is limited in one way or another. At odds with freeware which is intended to be free forever and is often permitted to be used in many different scenarios without a fee, shareware is cost-free but often severely limited in one or more ways, and only fully functional with the use of a paid shareware license. While shareware can be downloaded at no cost and is often how companies provide a free, limited version of their application to users, the program might nag the user to buy the full edition or prevent all functionality after a certain period.

Shareware is commercial software that is provided to customers free of charge, eventually enabling or allowing users to pay for the software's continued maintenance. Shareware is software that is distributed at no expense and is intended to be shared with others to promote the product, but is constrained in one manner or another, unlike freeware. Shareware is cost-free but often seriously restricted in one or more respects, and only entirely usable using a paid shareware license, in comparison to freeware that is meant to be free indefinitely and is often allowed to be used without a charge in several different cases. Although shareware can be accessed at no cost which is also how businesses provide consumers with a free, restricted version of their application, the software may nag the user after a certain time to purchase the full edition to stop all features.
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