Semester – I cs 1302 fundamentals of unix & c programming (Compulsory) Pre-requisites



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APPENDIX

Syllabus (B.3.6)
SEMESTER – I
CS 1302 FUNDAMENTALS OF UNIX & C PROGRAMMING (Compulsory)
Pre-requisites: A familiarity with high school algebra is expected, however the course assumes no prior programming knowledge.
Type: Lecture and Practical.
Course Assessment methods: Progressive evaluation in lab, Surprise test, End performance test, Viva-voice exam.
Course Outcomes: Students will have the capability:

  1. Of logging-in into UNIX operating system, create their own directories and files, move around among different files and directories, create, files in different ways.

  2. Of creating , editing, debugging and executing C programs using the Vi-editor.

  3. To solve problems related to arrays, strings, record and file handling.


Topics Covered:

                  1. MODULE – I [6 lectures]

The Free Software Movement, Open source definition, Open source business strategy, Problem Solving and its tools, Flow chart, Pseudo code, Modular programming. Fundamentals of Unix Operating System, Login & Password, Different Commands, Unix directory, Structure and working with directories, Vi-editor, Basic Structure and execution of C programmes, Constants, Variables, and Data Types and various type of declarations, Different type operators and Expressions, Evaluation of Expressions, Operator Precedence and Associability, Mathematical Functions.



                  1. MODULE –II [4 lectures]

Managing Input and Output operations, Decision Making and Branching Decision Making and Looping.



                  1. MODULE – III [5 lectures ]

One – dimensional Arrays and their declaration and Initialisations, Two-dimensional Arrays and their initialisations, Multidimensional Arrays, String Variables, Reading and Writing Strings, Arithmetic Operations on characters, Putting Strings together, Comparison of Two Strings, String – handling functions.



                  1. MODULE –IV [5 lectures]

Need and Elements for user –defined Functions, Definition of Functions, Return values and their types, Function calls and Declaration, Arguments and corresponding return values, Functions that return multiple values, Nesting of functions, Recursion, Passing arrays and strings to functions, The Scope, Visibility and Life time of variables.



                  1. MODULE –V [5 lectures]

Defining Structure, Declaring Structure Variable and Accessing Structure Members, Initialisation of Structure, Comparing Structure Variables, Operation on Individual Members, Arrays of Structures, Structures within structures, Structures and Functions, Unions, Size of Structures, Bit Fields.



                  1. MODULE – VI [6 lectures]

Understanding Pointers, Accessing the Address of a Variable, Declaration and Initialisation of Pointer Variables, Accessing a Variable through its Pointer, Chain of Pointers, Pointer Expressions, Pointer Increments and Scale Factor, Pointers and Arrays, Pointers and Character Strings, Arrays of Pointers, Pointers and Function Arguments, Functions Returning Pointers, Pointers to Functions, Pointers and Structures,


                  1. MODULE – VII [4 lectures]

File Management in C. use of fopen(), fclose(), Formatted file I/O, Searching through files using fseek(), ftell(), rewind().
Text Book :

  1. Kernighan K. R., Ritchie D. M. - The C Programming Language, Ansi C Edition, Prentice Hall, India


Reference:

  1. E. Balagurusamy – Programming in ANSI C, 3rd Edn. , TMH, New Delhi ; 2004

  2. A. N. Kanthane – Programming with ANSI and TURBO C, Pearson Education, New Delhi; 2004

  3. Y. Kanetkar – Let us C, 4th Edition, BPB Publication , New Delhi; 2002

  4. Chris DiBona, Sam Ockman , Open Sources : Voices from the Open Source Revolution (Web book), Oreilly Press, 2nd edition,1999



EE 2201 PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (Compulsory)

(Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering)
Pre-requisites: Engineering Physics.
Type: Lecture and Tutorial
Course Assessment Methods: Class tests, Individual assignment, Theory and Practical examinations.
Course Outcomes: A student will have-

  1. Basic understanding of, and ability to apply techniques for, DC circuit analysis as well as steady-state AC circuit analysis;

  2. Thorough understanding of network reduction techniques to analyze complex circuits;

  3. Conceptual knowledge about 1-φ and 3- φ circuits, resonance, magnetic circuits;

  4. Sufficient practice of solving a variety of problems.


Topics covered: DC and AC circuit fundamentals, Network theorems, Magnetic circuits.
Content Beyond Syllabus: Pragmatic applications of principles of electrical engineering for students of other branches.

.

Text/Reference Books:



  1. Basic Electrical Engg. – Nagrath, Kothari, Tata McGraw-Hill

  2. Hughes Electrical Technology – Pearson Prentice-Hall.

  3. Electrical Technology – Hayt, Kimmerley – Tata McGraw-Hill.



CH1401 Engineering Chemistry (Compulsory)

(Department of Chemistry)
Prerequisites: High school level chemistry
Type: Lecture
Course assessment methods: Theory, practical exam, quizzes assignments and mid semester & end semester examinations
Course Outcomes: Enables the student to:

  1. Draw the phase diagrams showing conditions at which thermodynamically distinct phases can occur at equilibrium in heterogeneous systems, identify the total number of phases , components and calculate the degree of freedom of various heterogeneous systems in equilibrium

  2. Classify different types of fuels mainly fossil fuels, evaluate their properties, solve problems pertaining to calorific value determination (both theoretical and experimental), Distinguish between High and low temperature carbonization, conversion of coal into commercially viable products.

  3. Depict the concept of refining of crude petroleum, understand the benefits of reforming and cracking, distinguish between petrol run and diesel run IC engine, be able to classify lubricants and discuss their mechanism of action vis a vis their properties.

  4. Demonstrate awareness that reactions occur at differing rates, experimentally determine rate of a reaction & analyze the reaction mechanism for a reacting system.

  5. Comprehend the role of catalysts in industrial processes, and be able to select the appropriate catalysts for each industrial application.

  6. Distinguish between the different classes of polymers and mechanism of polymerization, compute molecular weight averages from the molecular weight distribution. predict polymer properties based on polymer structure.

  7. Describe the basic electrochemical concepts of various corrosion processes. Discuss the factors responsible for corrosion, describe different corrosion prevention techniques, Analyze how electrochemical concepts can be used in various practical applications, like batteries, fuel cells etc.



Topics covered: Phase rule, fuel and combustion, solid fuel, gaseous fuels, liquid fuels and lubricants, chemical kinetics, catalysis, polymer and corrosion chemistry.
Textbooks

1.Applied Chemistry: A Text book for engineers and technologists by H.D.Geyser, Plenum publishers

2. Engineering Chemistry: Sashi Chawla/ Jain & Jain
Reference books

1. Physical chemistry: P.W. Atkins



HU 1101 Technical English (Compulsory)

(Department of Management)
Pre-Requisites: Basics of English Language like Vocabulary etc.
Course Type: Lecture
Course Assessment Methods: Theory, Individual Assignments, Written Examinations and Continuous Assessment.
Topics Covered: Single word substitution, Idioms& Phrases, Pair of words, Common errors, Précis, Comprehension and Expansion. Official correspondence and Business correspondence.
Course Outcomes: Enables the students to:

  1. Develop a range of writing processes appropriate to various writing tasks.

  2. Invent the contents of their communications through research and reflection.

  3. Observe appropriate generic conventions and formats for letters, résumés, memoranda, and a variety of informal and formal reports.

  4. Identify their readers and describe the characteristics of their readers in a way that forms a sound basis for deciding how to write to them.

  5. Employ available methods/technology effectively in the solution of communication problems.

  6. Employ sound principles of layout and design in creation of finished document pages, andinclude appropriate visual support.


Text Books :

  1. Henry Holt &Co.N.Y: Reports for science and industry.

  2. Berry, Thomas Elliot: The most common mistakes in English Usage; Mcgraw Hill.

  3. Best, W.D: The students companion; Rupa& Co.

  4. Mohan & Sharma: Report Writing & Business Correspondence; Mcgraw Hill.

  5. Stevnsin, B.W, J.R. Spicer and E.C. Ames: English in Business and Engineering; Prentice Hall.



MA 1201 Engineering Mathematics (Compulsory)

(Department of Applied Mathematics)
Pre – requisites: Basic of algebra, Calculus, trigonometry, Coordinate geometry
Type: Lecture, Tutorial.
Course – Assessment Methods: Theory Individual Assignment/Internal Quiz
Course Outcomes: Enable the student to

  1. Decide the behavior of sequence and series.

  2. Get an understanding of partial derivatives and their applications in finding maxima-minima problems.

  3. Apply the principles of integral to solve a variety of practical problems in engineering and sciences

  4. Gain an understanding of polar equations of conics, their tangent, normal, chord of contact etc.

  5. Solve problems involving derivative (gradient, divergence, curl etc.) and integrals (surface, volume etc.) of vector functions

  6. Demonstrate a depth of understanding in advanced mathematical topics

  7. Enhance and develop the ability of using the language of mathematics in engineering


Topic Covered: infinite sequences and series, differential Calculus, integral calculus, vector calculus, polar equations of conics
Text Books and /or Reference Materials

  1. M.D. Weir, J. Hass and F.R. Giordano: Thomas’ calculus, 11th edition, Pearson Education, 2008.

  2. Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 4th edition. Jones Nad Bartlett Publishers, 2010

  3. E. Kreyszig: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 8th Edition John Wiley and sons 1999.

  4. T.M. Apostol : Calculus Vols. 1 and 11.2nd Edition. John Wiley and sons, 1967 and 1969.



SEMESTER II

CS 2301 FUNDAMENTALS OF DATA STRUCTURES (Compulsory)

Prerequisites: Knowledge of programming languages like C/C++.

Type: Lecture, Tutorial.

Course Assessment Methods: Mid-semester exam, End- semester exam and Quiz.

Course Outcomes: Enables the student to


  1. Understand the properties of various data structures

  2. Identify the strength and weaknesses of different data structures

  3. Design and employ appropriate data structures for solving computing problems

  4. Analyze and compare the efficiency of algorithms

  5. Think critically

  6. Solve computing problems independently


Topics Covered:
MODULE – I [5 lectures]
Algorithms and Analysis of Algorithms
: Definition, Structure and Properties of Algorithms, Development of an Algorithm, Data Structures and Algorithms, Data Structure – Definition and Classification, Efficiency of Algorithms, Apriory Analysis, Asymptotic Notations, Time Complexity of an Algorithm using O Notation, Polynomial Vs Exponential Algorithms, Average, Best and Worst case Complexities, Analyzing Recursive Programs, Open source software development process.
MODULE – II [5 lectures]
Arrays, Stacks and Queues
: Array Operations, Number of Elements in an Array, Representation of Arrays in Memory, Applications of Array, Stack-Introduction, Stack Operations, Applications of Stack, Queues-Introduction, Operations on Queues, Circular Queues, Other Types of Queues, Applications of Queues.

MODULE – III [5 lectures]
Linked List, Linked Stacks and Linked Queues
: Singly Linked Lists, Circularly Linked Lists, Doubly Linked Lists, Multiply Linked Lists, Applications of Linked Lists, Introduction to Linked Stack and Linked Queues, Operations on Linked Stacks and Linked Queues, Dynamic Memory Management and Linked Stack, Implementations of Linked Representations, Applications of Linked Stacks and Linked Queues.
MODULE – IV [6 lectures]
Trees, Binary Trees, BST, AVL Trees and B Trees
: Trees: Definition and Basic Terminologies, Representation of Trees, Binary Trees: Basic Terminologies and Types, Representation of Binary Trees, Binary Tree Traversals, Threaded Binary Trees, Applications, BST & AVL Trees: Introduction, BST: Definition and Operations, AVL Trees: Definition and Operations, B Trees: Introduction, m-way search trees: Definition and Operations, B Trees: Definition and Operations.
MODULE – V [5 lectures]

Graphs: Introduction, Definitions and Basic Terminologies, Representations of Graphs, Graph Traversals, Single-Source Shortest-Path Problem, Minimum Cost Spanning Trees.
MODULE – VI [5 lectures]
Sorting
: Introduction, Shell Sort, Quick Sort, Heap Sort.
MODULE – VII [4 lectures]
Searching
: Introduction, Binary Search, Transpose Sequential Search, Interpolation Search.

Text Book:

  1. G A V Pai – Data Structures and Algorithms: Concepts, Techniques and Applications, 2nd Edn, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2008

  2. Horowitz E.Sahni, S., Susan A., Fundamentals of Data Structures in C, 2nd Edition, University Press, 2010

Reference Books:

  1. J. P. Tremblay , P. G. Sorenson – An Introduction to Data Structures With Applications, 2nd Edn, McGraw-Hill, Inc.  New York, NY, USA.

  2. Seymour Lipschutz – Data Structures, 6th Edn, 9th Reprint 2008, Tata McGraw-Hill.

  3. Adam Drozdek – Data Structures and Algorithms in C++, Thomson Learning, New Delhi – 2007.

  4. J. Feller, B. Fitzgerald -Understanding Open Source Software Development, Pearson Education Ltd. New Delhi



CS 2302 FUNDAMENTALS OF DATA STRUCTURES LAB (Compulsory)

Pre-requisites: Programming Language like C/C++.
Type: Practical.
Course Assessment Methods: Progressive evaluation, Surprise test, End performance test, Viva-voice exam.
Course Outcomes: Enable student to solve programming problems using


  1. Arrays, Stacks and Queues

  2. Various kinds of Linked Lists

  3. Various kinds of Trees and perform appropriate operations.

  4. Graphs

  5. Sorting and searching techniques.


Topics Covered: Programs on Array, Stack, Queue, Linked list, Graph, Tree, Searching and Sorting.
Text Book:

  1. G A V Pai – Data Structures and Algorithms: Concepts, Techniques and Applications, 2nd Edn, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2008

  2. Horowitz E.Sahni, S., Susan A., Fundamentals of Data Structures in C, 2nd Edition, University Press, 2010

Reference Books:

  1. J. P. Tremblay , P. G. Sorenson – An Introduction to Data Structures With Applications, 2nd Edn, McGraw-Hill, Inc.  New York, NY, USA.

  2. Seymour Lipschutz – Data Structures, 6th Edn, 9th Reprint 2008, Tata McGraw-Hill.

  3. Adam Drozdek – Data Structures and Algorithms in C++, Thomson Learning, New Delhi – 2007.

  4. J. Feller, B. Fitzgerald -Understanding Open Source Software Development, Pearson Education Ltd. New Delhi.


EC2001

Principles of Electronics Engineering (Compulsory)

(Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering)




Type:
Pre-requisite:

Lecture
Basics of Electronics Engineering, Semiconductor Devices, Digital Electronics


Course Assessment methods:

Theory and Individual Assessment/Internal Quiz.




Topics Covered:

RC Filters, Diodes and their applications, Bipolar Junction Transistors, Transistor Analysis, Amplifiers and Oscillators, Field Effect Transistors and Transistor Power amplifiers, Operational amplifiers and its applications, Logic circuits and Applications







Course outcomes: Enables the students to

  1. Understand RC filter, types of diode and their applications

  2. Study the characteristics and configurations of BJT.

  3. Analyze transistors at low and high frequencies

  4. Understand the concept of amplifiers and oscillators

  5. Study the characteristics of FET & MOSFET, also transistor power amplifier

  6. Understand the operation, characteristics and application of operational amplifier

  7. Implement logic gates using diodes and transistors.







Text books, and/or reference materials:

Text Books:

1. “Integrated Electronics” Millman&Halkias, McGraw Hill

2.”Digital Logic and Computer Design “M. Mano. PHI

3. “Operational Amplifiers and Linear Integrated Circuits” by R. A. Gayakwad, PHI




Reference Book:

  1. “The Art of Electronics”, Paul Horowitz and Winfield Hill, Cambridge University Press.

  2. “Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory”, Nashelesky&Boylestead, PHI/Low price edition.

  3. “Microelectronic Circuits”, Sedra and Smith.



EC2002

BASIC ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING LAB (Compulsory) (Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering)


Pre-requisite:

Basics of Electronics Engineering, Semiconductor Devices, Digital Electronics
Type: Practical

Type:
Course Assessment methods:

Practical
Theory and Individual Assessment/Internal Quiz.



Topics Covered:

RC Filters, Diodes and their applications, Bipolar Junction Transistors, Amplifiers and Oscillators, Operational amplifiers and its applications, Logic gates





Course outcomes: Enables the students to

  1. Understand RC filter, types of diode and their applications

  2. Understand the h parameter of transistor and it frequency response.

  3. Understand the concept of amplifiers and oscillators

  4. Understand the operation, characteristics and application of operational amplifier

  5. Understand the concept of basic logic gates using universal gates and verify the truth table.







Text books, and/or reference materials:

Text Books:

1. Integrated Electronics by Millman&Halkias, McGraw Hill

2. Digital Logic and Computer Design by M. Mano. PHI

3. Operational Amplifiers and Linear Integrated Circuits by R. A. Gayakwad, PHI




Reference Book:

  1. “The Art of Electronics”, Paul Horowitz and Winfield Hill, Cambridge University Press.

  2. “Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory”, Nashelesky&Boylestead, PHI/Low price edition.

  3. “Microelectronic Circuits”, Sedra and Smith.



ME 2001 PRINCIPLE OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (Compulsory)

(Department of Applied Mechanics)


Pre- requisites: Prior knowledge of fundamentals of thermodynamics and Mechanics
Course Assessment Methods: Theory Examinant/internal quiz
Course outcomes: Enables the student to

  1. Understand alternative eco friendly sources of energy and its utilization

  2. Know different types of used in the industry and steam generation process

  3. Examine critically the differences between petrol engines and diesel engines

  4. Learn the heat transfer due to conduction through a composite slab and pipe

  5. Find out the nature of stress and strain in brittle and ductile material; also design the basic elastic components of machinery under uni axial loading

  6. Know the working principle of different types of drives and the power transmission

  7. Develop a standard procedure to calculate the frequency of oscillation for damped and un damped vibration


Topics covered: Renewable energy sources, principle of steam generation, types of boilers, I.C. engines, Heat transfer, stress strain analysis, power transmission and vibration.
Text Books and/or References Materials:

  1. Non Conventional Energy Sources by G.D. Rai

  2. Power Plant Engineering by P.K.Nag

  3. Fundamentals of Classical Thermodynamics – G.J Van Wylen and R.E. Sorntag, Second Edition, Wiley Eastern (1984).

  4. Internal combustion engine – E.F. Obert

  5. Introduction to Heat Transfer by Incropera and David

  6. Strenght of Materials – F.L. Singer

  7. Theory of Machines – Thomas Beven



EE 3202 BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LAB. (Compulsory)

(Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering)
Pre-requisite: Engineering Physics.
Type: Practical
Assessment Methods: Individual assessment through daily viva, practical examinations, regular copy evaluation.

Course Outcomes:
A student will have-

  1. Working with the actual components and use of individual meters, also a conceptual idea of range of all instruments;

  2. Conceptual knowledge of operation of 1-φ and 3- φ circuits, resonance;

  3. Relation among voltage, current, power, power-factor etc.



Topics covered:

Concepts of measuring instruments, AC RLC series parallel circuit operation, resonance, KVL and KCL, 3-phase star and delta connections, basics of D.C machine, measurement of low and high resistance of D.C. machine, measurement of power by three voltmeter, three-ammeter & two-wattmeter method.


Content Beyond Syllabus: Application of electrical D.C and A.C machines in industrial set-up.
Text/Reference Books:

  1. Basic Electrical Engg. – Nagrath & Kothari, Tata Mc Graw-Hill

  2. Hughes Electrical Technology - Pearson

  3. Electrical Technology – Hayt, Kimmerley - Tata Mc Graw-Hill



CH 2301 Environmental Science (Compulsory)

(Department of Applied Chemistry)
Prerequisites: High school level chemistry
Course assessment methods: Theory, practical exam, quizzes assignments and mid semester & end semester examinations
Type: Lecture
Course Outcomes: At the end of this course the student should be able to

  1. Understand the basic structure of environment and its functions

  2. Identify the various pollutants present in the environment and trace the path of these pollutants

  3. Analyse the impact of multifarious human activities on various environmental segments

  4. Evaluate various environmental pollution control measures and environmental practices pertaining to industries, being implemented

  5. Imbibe green practices in day to day life


Topics Covered: Ecology and ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry, air pollution monitoring and control, municipal water quality and control, waste water treatment, soil noise and radiation pollution, solid waste management
Text Books & Reference Books:

1. Miller, T. G. Jr., Environmental Science, Wadsworth Publishing House, USA

2. De. A. K., Environmental Chemistry: New Age International (P) Ltd. Publishers.

3. Masters, G.M, Introduction to Environmental Engineering.

4. Connell, D. W., Basic Concepts of Environmental Chemistry

AM-1101/1201 Engineering Mechanics (Compulsory)

Department of Applied Mechanics

Pre-requisite: Since it is a basic engineering subject for engineering programme it does not have any pre-requisite.
Type: Lecture, Tutorial.
Assessment Method: Mid-term examination: 25 marks, End term examination: 60 marks and Teacher's Assessment: 15 marks.
Outcome: Students are expected to learn the following:

a) Understanding the principle and how to apply them

b) Mathematical modelling of the system of particle or rigid body for analysis

c) Finding key parameters needed to design a system of components

d) Clarity of ideas about how to solve engineering problems related to mechanics

e) different ways of solving similar types of problems


Topics Covered: Statics includes- Vector representation of forces and moments and its manipulations, Analysis of plane trusses and frames, parabolic cables, Calculation of shear force and bending moment, Interfacial friction, Methods of finding centre of gravity and moment of inertia.

Dynamics includes- Analysis of motion of particles and rigid bodies, kinematics of particles and rigid bodies, kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, Impulse- momentum principle, Work, Power and energy principles, Collision of elastic bodies.



Text Book:

Engineering Mechanics - Statics & Dynamics by S. Rajasekaran and G. Sankara Subramanian, (Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, 1999)


Reference Books:

1. Engineering Mechanics ( 3rd edition) by Dr. K.L. Kumar, (Tata McGraw Hill Pub. Co. Ltd, New Delhi, 1998)

2. Engineering. Mechanics by Irving H. Shames, P H I. ltd.

3. Vector Mechanics, Statics and dynamics ( S.T) By Fordinand P.Beer & E.Russall Johnson, Tata MeGraw Hill Pub. Co. Ltd.



AM-1202 Engineering Mechanics Laboratory (Compulsory)

Department of Applied Mechanics

Pre-requisite: AM-1101/1201 Engineering Mechanics
Type: Practical
Course Outcomes: Enables the students to

1. understand the finer point of experiments

2. understand the accuracy of the experimental results

3. learn the procedure for the experiment and calculation needed to extract final

data

4. learn to find the error estimation in experimental data and conclusion



5. learn to correlate the experimental data with the theory
Topics Covered: Following Experiment to be performed by the students:

1. Bending Moment To determine experimentally the bending moment in

(a) A Cantilever &

(b) A simply supported beam and to compare experimental value with the theoretical values.

2. Funicular polygon- To find magnitude and position of resultant force experimentally and to check the same by constructing the funicular Polygon Graphically.

3. Belt Wheel – To determine the value of u between the belt and the pulley.

4. `Friction – To compare co-efficient of friction between two given pairs of surface by sliding on an inclined plane.

5. Fly Wheel – To determine the moment of Inertia of the flywheel by falling weight method and to also determine the friction moment in the bearings.

6. Worm and Worm wheel – To determine effort required for lifting various loads effort lost in friction and efficiency.

7. Screw and Screw Jack – To compare effort required to lift various loads, effort lost in friction and efficiency for (a) Screw jack and (b) winch crab.

8. Pulley Block –To compare effort required for lifting various loads , effort lost in friction and efficiency for 4-pulley and 5-pulley systems.

9. Helical spring – To study the compression / Extension of a helical spring and to find its stiffness and modulus of rigidity at various loads.

10. To find the force of friction and moment of inertia of a rolling wheel by applications of general equations of plane motion
Text Book:

Printed laboratory manual
Reference Books:

Engineering Mechanics ( 3rd edition) by Dr. K.L. Kumar, (Tata McGraw Hill Pub. Co. Ltd, New Delhi, 1998)



MA2201 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (Compulsory)

(Department of Applied Mathematics)
Pre – requisites: Basic of algebra, Calculus, trigonometry, Coordinate geometry, topic covered in Engineering Mathematics
Type: Lecture, Tutorial.
Course Assessment Methods: Theory Individual Assignment/Internal Quiz
Course Outcomes: Enable the student to

  1. Formulate any real life problem in terms of differential equations.

  2. Investigate the occurrence of differential equations in science and engineering and the method available for their solutions

  3. Expand the function in the series of sine and cosine terms and apply it in engineering problems.

  4. Gain an understanding on complex variable function, analytic functions, and their properties using different theorems.

  5. Applications of complex variable functions

  6. Demonstrate a depth of understanding in advanced mathematical topics

  7. Enhance and develop the ability of using the language of mathematics in engineering


Topic Covered: ordinary and partial differential quations, function of a complex variable and its analysis, Fourier series.
Text Books and /or Reference Materials

Text Books

  1. Simmons G.F., Differential equations with applications and Historical notes. TMH, 2nd ed., 2003.

  2. R.V. Churchill and J.W. Brown, Complex Variables and Applications, 8th ed., 2009, McGraw – Hill.

  3. Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 4th edition. 2011

  4. E. Kreyszig: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 8th Edition John Wiley and sons 1999.


Reference Books:

  1. Edwards and Penney, Differential Equations and Boundary Value problems, Pearson Education, 3rd Ed.

  2. Shipley L. Ross, Differential Equations Wiley India Pvt.Ltd. 3rd Ed.

  3. Birkhoff and Rota, Ordinary Differential Equations, Wiley India Pvt.Ltd. 4th Ed.

  4. M.J. Ablowitz and A.S. Fokas, Complex Variable Introduction and applications, Cambridge Texts, 2nd Ed.

  5. Murray R Spiegel, Theory of complex Variable, McGraw – Hill, Schaum’s Outline series.



SEMESTER-III

CS 6101 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF COMPUTER ALGORITHMS (Compulsory)
Pre-requisites: Knowledge of basic data structures.
Type: Lecture.
Course Assessment Methods: Mid-semester exam, End-semester exam, Assignment/Quiz
Course Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Understand basic algorithm designing techniques such as divide and conquer, greedy, dynamic programming, backtracking and branch and bound and analyze them. .

  2. Various sorting algorithms, Travelling salesperson problem, shortest path problem, sum of subset, 0/1 knapsack problem.

  3. Understand and apply fundamental algorithmic problems including job scheduling, N queen problem, 8 puzzle problem, flow shop scheduling, optimal binary search tree, matrix multiplication, minimum weight spanning tree.

  4. Exploration of various research problems in algorithm like NP-hard and NP-complete problems

  5. Student will able to solve problems and analyze them using randomized approach also.


Topics Covered:
MODULE -I

Basic Tools on Designing Algorithms: What is an algorithm? Algorithm specification and performance analysis, randomized algorithms.



                  1. MODULE –II

Divide-and-Conquer: The general method, application to binary search, finding the maximum and minimum, merge sort, quick sort, the problem of selection and Strassen's matrix multiplication.
MODULE -III

The Greedy Method: The general method, application to optimal storage on tapes, job sequencing with deadlines, optimal merge patterns and minimum weight spanning trees.
MODULE –IV & V

Dynamic Programming: The general method, application to multistage graphs, all pairs shortest paths, optimal binary search trees,0/1-Knapsack and traveling salesman problem, Flow shop scheduling

Backtracking: The general method, application to 8- puzzle problem, 8- queen problem and sum of subsets.


MODULE -VI

Branch and Bound: The method, application to 0/1 Knapsack traveling salesman problems, and efficiency considerations.
MODULE -VII

NP-Hard and NP-Complete Problems: Introduction and basic concepts, non-deterministic turing machine, the classes of P and NP, NP-hard graph problems, NP-completeness of the satisfiability problem, and polynomial- space-bounded problem.
Text Book:

  1. E. Horowitz. et.al., Fundamentals of computer Algorithms, Universities Press, 2008, 2nd Edition.*-;


Reference Books:

  1. J.Kleinberg & E. Tardos – Algorithm Design, Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2006.

  2. G.Brassard & P. Bratley – Fundamentals of Algorithms, PHI, New Delhi, 2005.

  3. T.H. Cormen et.al. – Introduction to Algorithms – PHI, New Delhi, 2005.

  4. S.Dasgupta et.al. – Algorithms, TMH, New Delhi – 2007.



CS 3005 OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA (Compulsory)
Pre-requisites: Data Structure and Programming skills.
Type: Lecture.
Course Assessment Methods: Mid-semester exam, End-semester exam, Assignment/Quiz
Course Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Understand basic concepts of object oriented programming.

  2. Improve their programming skills.

  3. Apply the knowledge gained for their project work as well as to develop some GUI applications.

  4. Students are expected to go through the websites for latest know-how related to the subject.


Topics Covered:
Module 1

Introduction to OOP, Objects and classes, Characteristics of OOP, Difference between OOP and Procedure oriented programming. Introduction to Java Programming, Features of Java, Applications and Applets, JDK, Source File Structure


Module 2

Java language fundamentals, Building blocks of Java, Data Types, Variable declaration, Wrapper classes, Operators and Assignment, Control Structures, Arrays, Strings, StringBuffer class


Module 3

Java as an OOP Language, Defining classes, Modifiers, Packages, Interfaces, Exception Handling, Exception hierarchy, Constructors and methods of Throwable class, Unchecked and Checked Exceptions, Handling Exceptions in Java, Exception and Inheritance, Throwing user defined exceptions, Redirecting and rethrowing exceptions.


Module 4

Multithreading, Overview of threading, Creating threads, Thread Life-cycle, Thread priorites and Thread scheduling, Thread synchronization, Daemon Threads, Thread groups, Communication of Threads


Module 5

Files and I/O Streams, Java I/O, File Streams, FileInputStream and FileOutputStreams, Filter streams, Random Access files, Serialization


Module 6

Applets, Java Applications versus Java Application, Applet Life cycle, Working with Applets, The HTML APPLET Tag, java.Applet package


Module 7

AWT, Basic classes in AWT, Drawing with Graphics Class, Class hierarchy of AWT, Event Handling, Adapter classes, AWT Controls, Layout Managers, Swings, Swings packages, Hierarchy of Swing classes, Advanced layout Managers, Additional Swing Components.


Text Book:

  1. Krishna P. R., Object Oriented Programming through JAVA, 1st Edition, Universities Press, 2008.


Reference Books:

  1. Dietel,Dietel - Java How to program , 7th edition; Pearson Education , New Delhi.

  2. C. Horstmann,G. Cornell - Core Java 2 Vol I & Vol II ; Pearson Education , New Delhi.

  3. Balagurusamy -Programming in Java, 2nd Edition; Tata McGraw Hill Publication; New Delhi.

  4. Patrick Naghton & H. Schildt – The Complete Reference Java 2, Tata McGraw Hill Publication, New Delhi.



CS-3006 OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA(LAB) (Compulsory)
Pre-requisites: Data Structure and Programming skills.
Type: Practical.
Course Assessment Methods: Progressive evaluation, Surprise test, End performance test, Viva-voice exam.
Course Outcomes:

a. Students are expected to perform well in viva-voce/ sessional tests/ class assignments examination.

b. Students are expected to create simple programs using basic programming and OOPs concepts.

c. Students are expected to improve their programming skills.

d. Students are expected to apply the knowledge gained for their project work.

e. Students are expected to go through the websites for latest know-how related to the subject.


Topics Covered:

Java programs for creating package, class and object, using various access modifier., keywords, operators, control statements, method overloading, recursion, inheritance, exception handling, applets, multithreading, AWT, Swings, event-handling and GUI.



Text Book:

  1. Krishna P. R., Object Oriented Programming through JAVA, 1st Edition, Universities Press, 2008.


Reference Books:

  1. Dietel,Dietel - Java How to program , 7th edition; Pearson Education , New Delhi.

  2. C. Horstmann,G. Cornell - Core Java 2 Vol I & Vol II ; Pearson Education , New Delhi.

  3. Balagurusamy -Programming in Java, 2nd Edition; Tata McGraw Hill Publication; New Delhi.

  4. Patrick Naghton & H. Schildt – The Complete Reference Java 2, Tata McGraw Hill Publication, New Delhi.



EC3201 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (Compulsory)

(Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering)
Pre-requisites:Principles of Electronics
Type: Lecture and Tutorial
Course Assessment Methods:Theory, Practical Examination and Individual Assignment/Internal Quiz
Course Outcomes: Enables the student to

  1. Understand the Truth Table

  2. Identify the number of variables and their simplification importance

  3. Develop new applications

  4. Analyze the outcome of the circuit designed

  5. Create complex circuit with use of modular block interconnection

  6. Understand different circuits for the implementation of Boolean equations

  7. Develop the new applications of digital electronics using mixed circuis

Topics Covered: Gates, simplification techniques, combinational and sequential circuit design and

applications, Logic families, Memory, PLA and PLD’s.


Text Books and/or Reference Materials:

Text Book:

  1. Digital Logic and Design, M. Mano. PHI, Modern Digital Electronics, 3/e,R.P.Jain, TMH

Reference Books:

  1. Digital Electronics and Logic Design, JaydeepChakravorty,Univ. Press

  2. Digital Computer Electronics, Malvino and Brown, TMH



EC3202 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS LAB (Compulsory)

(Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering)

 

Pre-requisites: Digital Logic design


Type: Practical
Course Assessment Methods: Performance test, Individual viva, File, Quiz, Attendance
Course Outcomes: Students should be able to:

  1. Realize a Boolean expression with CMOS switches

  2. Use multiplexers and decoders in designing combinational systems.

  3. Implement the registers and counters using flip-flop circuit

  4. Able to develop an in-depth understanding of the design principles and application of digital circuits.

  5. Understatnd the circuit operation of the 555 timer IC and its application in multivibrator.


Topic covered: Parity bit checker & generator, Line encoder, Magnitude Comparator, Seven segment decoder, Flip-flop, Binary Parallel adder, Multivibrator( Astable & Monostable), CMOS Switch , Multiplexer (CMOS switch), Serial in Serial out register, Ripple counter, Schmitt Trigger.
Content beyond syllabus: NA
Text Books and/or Reference Materials:

  1. Digital Logic and Computer Design By M Morris Mano, Pearson Education.

  2. Digital Systems Principles and Applications, R.J.Tocci, Neal S.Widmer, Gregory L. Moss, Pearson Education.

  3. Modern Digital Electronics, 3/e, R.P.Jain, TMH.

  4. Op-Amps And Linear Integrated Circuits 4th Editition, Ramakant A. Gayakwad, Prentice-Hall.



BT 3021 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (Breadth Paper)

(Department of Biotechnology)


Type: Lecture
Course Assessment Methods: Theory examination and internal quiz
Course Outcome:

  1. Students will be able to understand the concept of life and its evolution.

  2. Students will be able to define and explain major concepts in the biological sciences.

  3. Students will be able to communicate biological knowledge in oral and written form.

  4. Students will be able to recognize the relationship between structure and function at all levels: molecular, cellular, and enzymatic.

  5. Students will be able to understand the structure and function of enzymes.

  6. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to read, understand, and critically review scientific information.

  7. Develop a standard procedure to calculate the frequency of oscillation for damped and un damped vibration

Topics Covered:

Nature of living things, Biomolecules, Biochemistry, Molecular organization of cell, Molecular biology, Enzymology, Techniques in biological sciences


Text Book and/or Reference Material

  1. Purves et al, Life: The Science of Biology

  2. R. Dulbecco, the Design of Life.

  3. Lehninger A, Principals of Biochemistry

  4. Stryer L, Biochemistry



CS 4101 Discrete Mathematical Structures (Compulsory)

(Department of Applied Mathematics)
Pre – requisites: Basic algebra
Type: Lecture
CourseAssessment Methods: Theory Individual Assignment/Internal Quiz
Course Outcomes: Enable the student to

  1. Get an understanding of various possible discrete Structures

  2. Construct and understand mathematical proofs

  3. Design finite structures like strings, databases etc. and analysis computer algorithms.

  4. Use the knowledge in finite state machine and coding theory

  5. Solve problems occurring in the development the programming languages, Boolean algebra and logic networks.

  6. Model and solve problems in informatics (network Connectivity) and data structures

Topic Covered: Logic and Mathematical reasoning, relation, functions, algebra structures, graphs, trees
Text Books and /or Reference Materials

  1. B.Kolman et.al - Discrete Mathematical Structures, 5th editions. Pearson Education, New Delhi-2004

  2. K.H. Rosen - Discrete Mathematics and its Applications-4th editions,Tata McGraw – Hill, New Delhi-2001

  3. J.P. Tremblay et.al - Discrete Mathematical Structures with applications to Computer Science, TMH, New Delhi-2004

SEMESTER-IV
CS 4109 COMPUTER SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE (Compulsory)
Pre-requisites: Digital Logic Design.
Type: Lecture, Tutorial.
Course Assessment Methods: Mid-semester exam, End-semester exam, Assignment/Quiz
Course Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. Describe performance evaluation of computers, computer architecture and organization, computer arithmetic, Memory and CPU design.

    2. Describe I/O system and interconnection structures of computer.

    3. Identify high performance architecture design, Pipelining and Multiprocessors.

    4. Develop independent learning skills and be able to learn more about different computer

architectures and hardware.
Topics Covered:

MODULE I

DESIGN METHODOLOGY: System Design, System Representation, Design Process, Gate, Registers, Register-Level Components, Programmable Logic Devices, Register-Level Devices, Processor- level Components, Processor-level Design.

MODULE II

PROCESSOR BASICS: CPU Organization, Fundamentals, Additional Floating-Point Numbers, Data Representation Basic Format, Fixed-Point Numbers, Floating-Point Numbers, Instruction Sets, Instruction Formats and Types.

MODULE III

DATAPATH DESIGN: Fixed-Point Arithmetic, Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division, Arithmetic Logic Units, Combinational ALUs, Sequential ALUs.

MODULE IV

CONTROL DESIGN: Basic Concepts, Introduction, Hardwired Control, Microprogramming, Basic Concepts, Multiplier Control Unit, Control, Pipeline Control, Instruction Pipeline, Arithmetic Pipeline.

MODULE V

MEMORY ORGANIZATION

Memory Technology, Memory Device Characteristics, Random Access Memories, Serial Access Memories, Memory Systems Multilevel Memories, Address Translation, Memory Allocation, Cache, Main Features, Address Mapping.



MODULE VI

SYSTEM ORGANIZATION: Communication Methods, Basic concepts Bus Control, System Control, DMA and Interrupts.

MODULE VII

ADVANCED TOPICS: Pipeline Processing, Parallel Processing.
Text Book

1. Hayes, J.P., “Computer Architecture and Organization”, 3rd ed McGraw-Hill, London , 2000



Reference Books

  1. Mano, M.M., “Computer System Architecture” , Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 1995

  2. Heuring V.P., etal., “ Computer System Design and Architecture”, Addision Wesley Indian Reprint, 2000

  3. Hamacher.V., etal, (Computer Organzation” ,4th edition, McGraw Hill, Singapore, 1996

  4. Ram. B.”Computer Fundamentals: Architecture and Organization”,3rd ed New Age International Publication, New Delhi, 2000




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