Somerville High School 222 Davenport street



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Physics Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Introduction to Physics

Biology and Chemistry

5

See page 4

Physics College Prep

Biology and Chemistry

6

See page 4

Physics Honors

Honors placement criteria

Biology Honors, Chemistry Honors



6

See page 6



ADVANCED PLACEMENT physics

Grades: 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
Advanced Placement Physics is designed to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Physics B examination in May. The course provides a thorough review of all introductory areas of physics plus a rigorous study of the more complex and challenging topics found in the modern physics course. Course work relies on the collection of data and analysis of quantitative and qualitative data. Students complete a summer assignment.
Advanced Placement Physics Course Option


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Advanced Placement Physics

Honors placement criteria

Physics Honors



6

See page 6



college prep Comparative anatomy and physiology

Grades: 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
College Prep Comparative Anatomy and Physiology is a science course designed for students who are interested in attending a four-year college with emphasis on the life science and/or health science fields. This course focuses on important concepts in comparative anatomy and physiology including: muscular, skeletal, digestive, and circulatory systems of the body. The dissection of a higher-level mammal is used as a tool for comparative analysis of the major body systems.


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Anatomy and Physiology

Physics College Prep,

Physics Honors



5

See page 4


Social Studies
Somerville High School requires three years of social studies for graduation: World Studies, US History I, and US History II in grades 9, 10, and 11, respectively. Elective courses are also available. The Social Studies course sequence is aligned with the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards, district curricula, and the statewide assessment system.

World Studies

Grade: 9 Length of Course: Academic Year
World Studies is a foundation social studies course designed for ninth grade students. The program assesses the geographic, social, political, economic, cultural, and technological factors that have shaped human history. Western and non-Western civilizations and historical events are analyzed from the development of written law and democratic ideas to the present state of global affairs. Structured both thematically and chronologically, this course offers students an opportunity to track the development of their own culture through comparison with those of other nations. Included in the study of diverse civilizations is an examination of modern day instances of genocide.
World Studies Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

World Studies College Prep

None

5

See page 4

World Studies Honors

Honors placement criteria

5

See page 6



United States History I

Grade: 10 Length of Course: Academic Year
Students in United States History I analyze the growth of American power and influence from the period of Reconstruction to the post World War I era. An examination of technological innovations and immigration patterns provides students with an understanding of the shifting demographic and economic landscape of the United States in the early twentieth century. A discussion of the conflict among emerging philosophies prepares students to examine World War I and the sociological, political, and economic outcomes of that global event. Students discuss injustice and inequality and the shift in moral values that took place after the war as they study the long-term effects of that conflict. Connections are made to current economic, social, and moral issues as students research historical events and present global occurrences.

United States History I Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

US History I College Prep

World Studies

5

See page 4

US History I Honors

Honors placement criteria

World Studies Honors



5

See page 6



United States History II

Grade: 11 Length of Course: Academic Year
Students in the United States History II course will assess the geographic, social, political, economic, cultural, and technological factors that shaped the United States during the 20th and 21st centuries. The study of significant events is organized thematically and chronologically to enable students to track trends and themes in the history of the United States while developing the skills necessary to become responsible and informed citizens.
United States History II Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

US History II Applied

US History I

5

See page 4

US History II College Prep

US History I

5

See page 4



Advanced Placement United States History

Grade: 11 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Advanced Placement Government and Politics – Comparative Politics course is designed as an introductory political science course in which students gain and demonstrate an understanding of comparative politics through the study of various nations and the analysis of political systems. Topics for discussion include, but are not limited to, industrialized democracies, Mexico, Nigeria, Iran, and the future of foreign policy. The Advanced Placement Program Course Description published by the College Board states, “Students successfully completing this course will be able to compare and contrast political institutions and processes across countries and derive generalizations.”
Advanced Placement United States History Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Advanced Placement

US History



Honors Placement Criteria

US History I Honors



5

See page 6

Economics

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
Students in the full year Economics course study human behavior in relation to resources and responsible citizenship. The roles of consumer, producer, saver, and investor are analyzed through an examination of the economies of the United States and the global community. The relationship of historical events to variances in economic stability is examined. Students participate in projects that require research of local, national, and global economies. Practical applications of information discussed in this course contribute to preparation of students to live in the global economy of the 21st century.
Economics Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Economics

World Studies

5

See page 4



Criminal and Civil Law

Grade: 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Criminal and Civil Law course of study is designed to provide the student with an in-depth review of the working relationship between the law and themselves. The course focuses on the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the criminal justice process. Special emphasis is also placed on how the law works to benefit the individual and the community.
Criminal and Civil Law Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Criminal and Civil Law

World Studies

5

See page 4



Sociology and Popular Culture and Media

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
Students in the Sociology course study human relationships that form a society. The varied ways in which people interact individually and within groups are traced from infancy, through childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Roles and status in the social structure are examined and defined in this semester long course. The diversity of human relations, cultures, and customs is emphasized in concert with the connection between the study of behavior and the prevailing popular culture and media.
The Popular Culture and Media Literacy elective course is designed to educate students on American popular culture. The course will review the types of media that influence students (e.g., television, Internet, magazines, music) and how popular culture affects today’s youth. Students compare and contrast local and regional culture with cultures in other parts of the country and the world. Topics for discussion include, but are not limited to, the history of popular culture, linking popular culture to media literacy, and other countries’ citizens view America. It is expected that students who enroll in Popular Culture and Media Literacy will also take Sociology. Students in grade 10, 11, or 12 may enroll in this course.
Sociology Popular Culture and Media Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Sociology and Popular Culture and Media

English I

5

See page 4



Psychology

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
Students in the Psychology course study human behavior through observation of human interaction. The study of personality theories and techniques for measuring personality development as well as an examination of the effects of heredity and environment contribute to understanding of self and others. Methods for coping with frustration, conflict, depression, and anxiety as well as the treatment of behavior disorders are studies, demonstrating ways in which the study of psychology may play a role in addressing societal problems. Case studies introduce real life problem situations to students that require informed critical thinking methods and collaborative decision making to effect appropriate resolutions.
Psychology Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Psychology

None

5


Advanced Placement Government and Politics

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Advanced Placement Government and Politics – Comparative Politics course is designed as an introductory political science course in which students gain and demonstrate an understanding of comparative politics through the study of various nations and the analysis of political systems. Topics for discussion include, but are not limited to, industrialized democracies, Mexico, Nigeria, Iran, and the future of foreign policy. The Advanced Placement Program Course Description published by the College Board states, “Students successfully completing this course will be able to compare and contrast political institutions and processes across countries and derive generalizations.”
Advanced Placement Government and Politics Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Advanced Placement Government and Politics

Honors Placement Criteria

Advanced Placement US History



5

See page 6


Technology Education

Introduction to engineering design

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) course is the first year of a four (4) year high school level pre-engineering program. In this course students learn about the different fields of engineering, general engineering concepts and the engineering design process. Students will design individual products, create the drawings and documentation, and present their designs. The Puzzle Cube and The Brio Construction Vehicle Reverse Engineering Project are two plans and drawings examples of design projects. The design capabilities of these projects will be enhanced by the use of the state of the art Autodesk Inventor 3-D Modeling software.
Introduction to Engineering Design Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Introduction to Engineering Design

None

5



principles of engineering

Grade: 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Principles of Engineering course advances students’ knowledge of engineering through a firm and in-depth exploration of multiple engineering fields. Students learn about simple and advanced machines and the design and build of such machines, including a freight elevator and a marble sorting machine. Computer-integrated manufacturing is explored through programming, virtual design, manufacturing, and automating original student designs using the Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) mill and robotic arm. Principles of Engineering focuses on identifying, designing, building, and testing bridges.
Principles of Engineering Design Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Principles of Engineering

Introduction to Engineering Design

5


digital electronics

Grade: 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Digital Electronics (DE) course is the third year of a four (4) year high school level pre-engineering program. Students further advance their knowledge of the world of engineering by venturing into topics about general electrical engineering theory, binary numbers, digital problem solving, programmable logic, and the world of robotics. Additional activities include programming Integrated Circuits to design products such as digital display clocks and light sensitive alarms. Advanced topics of robotics programming are dead reckoning, sensor control navigation, and infrared navigation.
Digital Electronics Design Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Digital Electronics

Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering

5



engineering design and development

Grade: 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Engineering Design and Development course serves as the capstone course within the Project Lead The Way sequence. The purpose of the program is to provide direct application of the skills and knowledge learned in prerequisite courses to real-world problems. Students use Autodesk Inventor software to assist in designing solutions to specific problems selected by teams of students. Engineering Design and Development tests time management and team skills, which are valuable assets in post-secondary education and the work force.
Engineering Design and Development Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Engineering Design and Development

Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering, Digital Electronics

5


Engineering of the future

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
Engineering of the Future is designed to provide students with opportunities to explore various facets and applications of engineering careers as they continue to be developed. Possible modules may include, but are not limited to, studies in biotechnology, conservation engineering, and robotics, all based on current pre-engineering practices.
Engineering of the Future Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Engineering of the Future

None

5


World Language
Somerville High School requires one year of World Language for graduation. The World Language course sequence is aligned with the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards, district curricula, and the statewide assessment system.

french I

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
Students in the French I world language course are introduced to formal language study. The focus of this first-level course is to assist the student to develop conversational and written skills necessary to express oneself and one’s needs using basic vocabulary and grammar forms in the French language. A study of the Francophone culture provides students with a better understanding of the lives, customs, and history of French-speaking people. Holocaust and genocide studies focus on the effects of those events in current French society.

French I Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

French I College Prep

None

5

See page 4



french II

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The French II course advances students’ knowledge of the language and customs of the Francophone world through the development of vocabulary and grammar. Fluency is expanded by applying language learning skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The culture of Francophone nations is explored through exposure to culturally-authentic documents and media, as well as short reading passages and visual supports. Holocaust and genocide studies are included as students explore the roles of rescuers and resisters during the Holocaust in France.
French II Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

French II College Prep

French Grade 7 and 8 or French I

5

See page 4

French II Honors

Honors placement criteria

5

See page 6


French III

Grade: 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
Students in the French III course transition from the beginning level of study to an advanced linguistic experience. Attention is dedicated to the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills to prepare students to function creatively and productively in a French speaking environment. In addition to the enhancement of vocabulary skills, grammatical expertise, and technology skills, students gain insight into the diverse cultures of Francophone nations through authentic reading materials and media. An examination of the impact of the Holocaust is included in the study of the events of the twentieth century in France.
French III Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

French III College Prep

French II

5

See page 4

French III Honors

Honors placement criteria

5

See page 6



French IV

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The French IV course builds students’ proficiency through a variety of guided writing and conversational activities. The study of literature and culturally-authentic documents enhances the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Language proficiency is demonstrated through the completion of digital portfolio projects, listening exercises, simulated conversations, written assignments, and Internet-based communication experiences. Holocaust and genocide studies focus on the legacy of the Holocaust in France and stories of survivors.
French IV Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

French IV College Prep

French III

5

See page 4

French IV Honors

Honors placement criteria

5

See page 6



FRENCH V

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The French V course furthers students’ knowledge of the French language through a variety of guided writing and conversational activities. Advanced grammar and vocabulary are explored through the study of literature, history, and culturally-authentic documents. Students demonstrate proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through the creation and expansion of digital portfolios. Listening exercises, written essays and reports, and oral presentations require the application and integration of language skills and knowledge. Holocaust and genocide studies focus on the Resistance movement in France during World War II.
French V Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

French V College Prep

French IV

5

See page 4



Advanced Placement French

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Advanced Placement French course develops students’ proficiency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing through a variety of learning experiences. Students’ understanding of French history and culture is expanded through exposure to authentic art, literature, and music. Emphasis is placed on the development of self-expression that is accurate, fluent, and coherent in both written and oral forms. Holocaust and genocide studies focus on the French Resistance and the political aftermath of World War II. Students enrolled in Advanced Placement French may elect to take the Advanced Placement French examination in May. The Advanced Placement French curriculum is submitted to and approved by the College Board.
Advanced Placement French Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Advanced Placement French

Honors placement criteria

5

See page 6



Spanish I

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Spanish I course introduces students to the foundational skills of language study in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The focus of this course is to develop conversational and written skills necessary to communicate in basic terms in the target language. A study of Hispanic cultures provides students with an understanding of the lives, customs, and history of Hispanic people worldwide.

Spanish I Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Spanish College Prep

None

5

See page 4


Spanish II

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Spanish II course focuses on the continuation of formal study in the target language. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are further developed through a concentrated study of vocabulary and grammar. Study of the diversity of Hispanic cultures provides students with a deeper understanding of customs and habits of Spanish-speaking people.
Spanish II Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Spanish II College Prep

Spanish I

5

See page 4

Spanish II Honors

Honors placement criteria

5

See page 6



Spanish III

Grade: 10, 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Spanish III course transitions from the beginning levels of language study to an advanced linguistic learning experience. Development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills is promoted through a variety of strategies, including vocabulary enhancement, application of advanced grammar, and examination of culturally-authentic materials from diverse Hispanic nations. Through the use of digital tools, students connect with their peers to share information, solve problems, and gain insight into the varied experiences of young people around the world. Knowledge of art, literature, and social issues enhances fluency and prepares students to function creatively and productively in a Spanish-speaking environment. Holocaust and genocide studies are included in an examination of both peninsular and Central and South American art and literature.
Spanish III Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Spanish III College Prep

Spanish II

5

See page 4

Spanish III Honors

Honors placement criteria

5

See page 6

Spanish IV

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
Students in the Spanish IV course develop proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and expand understanding of the Hispanic culture. Authentic documents, as well as classical and contemporary reading materials, reinforce reading comprehension. A conversational approach to learning vocabulary and grammar concepts promotes the ability to express ideas fluently, coherently, and accurately in the target language. Technology applications allow opportunities for communication with Spanish-speaking students in other locales while listening exercises, videos, cooperative group work, and individual presentations enrich the language learning experience.
Spanish IV Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Spanish IV College Prep

Spanish III

5

See page 4

Spanish IV Honors

Honors placement criteria

5

See page 6



Spanish V

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
Students in the Spanish V course develop proficiency in language skills through a variety of guided writing and conversational activities. The study of Hispanic literature and culture enhances students’ ability to express ideas fluently, coherently, and accurately in written and oral forms. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing experiences enrich the growth of confidence and ability to use the target language. Communicative skills are further supported by digital communication with other language learners and the maintenance of an electronic journal documenting personal learning goals and growth.
Spanish V Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Spanish V College Prep

Spanish IV

5

See page 4


Advanced Placement Spanish

Grade: 11, 12 Length of Course: Academic Year
The Advanced Placement Spanish course develops student proficiency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing through a variety of learning experiences. Students’ understanding of Hispanic history and culture is expanded through exposure to authentic art, literature, and music. Emphasis is placed on the development of self-expression that is accurate, fluent, and coherent in both written and oral forms. Holocaust and genocide studies focus on the events of the Spanish Civil War and civil wars in Latin American countries. Students enrolled in Advanced Placement Spanish may elect to take the Advanced Placement Spanish examination in May. The Advanced Placement Spanish curriculum is submitted to and approved by the College Board.
Advanced Placement Spanish Course Options


Course

Title

Prerequisite

Requirements

Credits Earned

Program of Studies Notes

Advanced Placement Spanish

Honors placement criteria

5

See page 6


Appendices

Somerville High school

APPLICATION FOR INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAM
Date of Application:

Student Name:

Address:

Phone:


  1. Why are you interested in the Independent Study Program?




  1. Project Title:




  1. General description of project (including goals and objectives) (Attached separate sheet if necessary)




  1. Describe basic approach and procedures to be used:




  1. List resources and facilities needed for your project and note their availability:




  1. How will you document your time?




  1. What previous experience have you had in this area?




  1. Who will be your faculty advisor? Name:




  1. How will your advisor supervise your project? What assistance will you require?




  1. Describe the closing project that your final evaluation will be based upon:


Date:

Student Signature


Date:

Counselor Signature


Date:

Teacher-Advisor Signature


Date:

Parent Signature


Date:

Principal Signature



Date:

Director of Curriculum Signature


Final status of application:
Approved: Date: Approved for credits

Rejected: Date:



Student Notified: Date:
*If a student elects to withdraw from his/her Independent Study, a grade of "W" will be given and indicated on
the student's permanent transcript.


Somerville High School
Early Work Release Program


Employer verification

Student’s Name:


Job Title: School Year:
Please be advised that the above named student-learner has received proper on-the-job training and safety training for the occupation of which he/she is currently employed.

Company Name


Company Phone Number


Supervisor’s Name (PLEASE PRINT)


Supervisor’s Signature


Date Approved



Somerville High School

Guidance Department

222 Davenport Street, Somerville, NJ 08876

Phone: (908) 243-1550


Early Work Release Program
Student Application

(Please Print Neatly)

Student Name: Grade: Date:


Address:
Phone Number:
Number if Credits Earned:
Number of Credits Currently Taking:
Total Credits:

On a separate page, you must respond to the following:




  • Why you would like to participate in the early work release program?




  • Describe your post secondary goals.




  • Describe what your job responsibilities will be.

Applications Will Not be accepted after September 30th

SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

SOMERVILLE, NJ
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION TRAINING AGREEMENT
School District: Date:

Employer: Employer's Address:
Student-Learner: Student-Learner’s Address:
Student-Learner’s Date of Birth: Date Working Papers were issued: Starting Wage:

As an EMPLOYER, I agree to do the following:

  • Adhere to all federal and state regulations regarding employment including the Fair Labor Standards Act, insurance, safety, child labor laws, State and Federal civil rights laws, minimum wage and nondiscrimination, and other applicable regulations.

  • Agrees to comply with all child labor laws.

  • Provide the employer-based learning site for the student, provide direct supervision at all times and assist the student in achieving the necessary occupational and academic skills and knowledge.

  • Ensure that the combination of the student's school hours and work hours do not exceed 40 hours in one week.

  • Will certify that an employee is not being displaced by hiring this student in a structured employer-based learning experience.

  • Will provide adequate equipment of the student to gain experience consistent with the occupation.

  • Will provide a safe and healthful work environment.

  • Never allow Somerville High School students to work in confined spaces ("Permit Required Confined Space" law).

  • Comply with all state and federal civil rights laws mentioned above.

  • Complete the Vocational Agreement form.

  • Complete quarterly evaluation reports on the student-learner.

  • Provide on-the-job training.

  • Provide safety training for the student-learner.

  • Send verification to the Somerville High School Guidance Office, indicating that training was provided.

  • Employ the student-learner for an average of 15 hours per week during the school year, barring dismissal for cause.

  • Agree neither to discharge nor change the status of the student learner without first consulting with the Guidance Office.

  • Agree to excuse the student-learner from work for any school sponsored activity, without prejudice.

  • Notify the Guidance Office as soon as possible any time the student-learner fails to appear for work or fails to call in sick at the scheduled time, or fails to stay for the scheduled time.

  • Be available for conference with the Guidance Office, the student-learner, or both, as necessary.

Employer's Signature: Date:





As a STUDENT-LEARNER, I agree to do the following:

  • Complete the Vocational Agreement form, and have your parent/guardian sign the form.

  • Submit to the Guidance Office a copy of pay stubs on or about the 15th and 30th of each month.

  • Not go to work on any date that he/she was not in attendance at school.

  • Demonstrate honesty, punctuality, courtesy, and a cooperative attitude, proper health, and grooming habits, appropriate dress and willingness to learn.

  • Obey the rules and regulations of the workplace and comply with the employer's business practices and hiring procedures (may involved drug testing).

  • Notify the school and employer if unable to report to work.

Student-Learner's Signature: Date:




Parent/Guardian's Signature: Date:


THIS AGREEMENT IS BASED ON THE NEW JERSEY MODEL WORK-BASED LEARNING EXPERIENCE AGREEMENT (WORKFORCE NEW JERSEY PUBLIC INFORMATION NETWORK, STATE OF NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF LABOR), AND THE COOPERATIVE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION TRAINING AGREEMENT (STATE OF NEW JERSEY, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION).


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