Southwest licking local school district administrator and teacher


THREE-YEAR LONG RANGE PLAN OF GIFTED SERVICES FOR



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THREE-YEAR LONG RANGE PLAN OF GIFTED SERVICES FOR
SOUTHWEST LICKING LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICT
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
K
Provide enrichment pull-out (2x/week) for advanced readers (Book Club)

Independent Study
Provide enrichment pull-out (2x/week) for advanced readers (Book Club)
Independent Study
Provide enrichment pull-out (2x/week) for advanced readers (Book Club)
Independent Study
Provide enrichment pull-out (2x/week) for advanced readers (Book Club)
Independent Study
1
Enrichment exercises

Provide resource ideas to general education teachers
Enrichment exercises

Compacting curriculum

Clustering


Enrichment exercises

Clustering

Compacting curriculum

Flexible grouping across classes in grade

2



Enrichment exercises

Provide resource ideas to general education teachers
Enrichment exercises

Compacting curriculum

Clustering


Enrichment exercises

Clustering

Compacting curriculum

Flexible grouping across classes in grade

3
Pull-out 1x weekly
Pull-out 1x weekly

Inclusion services at PES/KES/EES 1x/month

Consulting and enrichment services 1x/month


Pull-out 1x weekly

Clustering

Inclusion services at PES/KES/EES 1x/month

Consulting and enrichment services 1x/month

Pull-out 1x weekly
Clustering

Inclusion services at PES/KES/EES 1x/month

Consulting and enrichment services 1x/month


4
Pull-out 1x weekly
Pull-out 1x weekly

Inclusion services at PES/KES/EES 1x/month

Consulting and enrichment services 1x/month


Pull-out 1x weekly

Clustering

Inclusion services at PES/KES/EES 1x/month

Consulting and enrichment services 1x/month

Pull-out 1x weekly
Clustering

Inclusion services at PES/KES/EES 1x/month

Consulting and enrichment services 1x/month


5
Pull-out 1x weekly
Pull-out 1x weekly

Inclusion services at PES/KES/EES 1x/month

Consulting and enrichment services 1x/month


Pull-out 1x weekly

Clustering

Inclusion services at PES/KES/EES 1x/month

Consulting and enrichment services 1x/month

Pull-out 1x weekly
Clustering

Inclusion services at PES/KES/EES 1x/month

Consulting and enrichment services 1x/month


6
Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted math

Enrichment with support aide


Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted math

Enrichment with support aide


Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted math

Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted math

7
Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted math

Enrichment with support aide


Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted math

Enrichment with support aide


Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted math

Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted math

8
Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted math

Enrichment with support aide


HS math opportunity

Gifted ELA - Challenge

Enrichment with support aide

Gifted science

Foreign language (HS)


HS math opportunity

Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted science


Foreign language (HS)
HS math opportunity

Gifted ELA - Challenge

Gifted science


Foreign language (HS)
HS



AP/Honors Classes: AP Literature & Composition, AP Language and Composition, AP Calculus, AP Statistics
AP/Honors Classes: AP Literature & Composition, AP Language and Composition, AP Calculus, AP Statistics, AP Chemistry
AP/Honors Classes: AP Literature & Composition, AP Language and Composition, AP Calculus, AP Statistics, AP Chemistry, AP SS
GIFTED DEFINITION

Gifted students are those who by virtue of their outstanding abilities are capable of superior performance and achievement. These abilities, either potential or demonstrated, include general intellectual ability, specific academic aptitude, creative thinking ability, and visual and/or performing arts ability. These students, in order to more fully realize their potential and achieve at levels commensurate with their abilities, require educational programs and services beyond those normally provided in the regular school program.


According to Ohio Administrative Code 3301-51-15, students are identified as gifted in a particular area if they meet the following criteria:


  1. Superior Cognitive: A score on a nationally normed standardized ability test of two standard deviations above the mean, minus the standard error of measurement. For instance if a test has a standard deviation of 16, with 100 as the mean, a score of two standard deviations above the mean would be a score of 132. If the standard error of measurement is 3 for a particular test, then the score would be 129 (132 minus 3). Any child with an ability of 129 or above on that particular test meets the states guidelines as being superior cognitively gifted.




  1. Specific Academic: A score on a nationally normed standardized achievement test of 95th percentile on a composite subject test, such as the overall math score, or language score. The state recognizes students as being gifted in the areas of math, reading/language, science, or social studies.




  1. Creative Thinking Ability: This area requires that students meet two criteria. First, a score on a nationally normed standardized ability test of one standard deviation above the mean, minus the standard error of measurement. Again with 16 as the standard deviation, we see a score of 116. If the standard error of measurement is 5, a student must score 111 (116 minus 5) to meet the first part of the criteria. Secondly, a student must meet a certain score required by the state on a checklist of creative behaviors.




  1. Visual/Performing Arts: This area also requires that students meet two criteria. First, they must meet a certain score required by the state on a checklist of artistic behaviors. Second, they must demonstrate their abilities to trained individuals.

GIFTED IDENTIFICATION CHART

CRITERIA ESTABLISHED BY

THE OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Superior Cognitive Ability



Specific Academic Ability

Creative Thinking Ability



Visual and/or

Performing Arts Ability

Score two standard deviations above the mean minus the SEM on an individual or group Intelligence Test*
OR

Score at the 95th percentile or above on an individual or group Achievement Test* (Basic or Composite)
OR

Attain an approved score** on an above grade level standardized, nationally normed approved test*

(E.g.: Scoring well on the ACT or SAT as an 8th grader)




Score at the 95th percentile or above on an individual or group Achievement Test* in any of the following areas:

Math, Social Studies, Science,

Reading, or Writing

Score one standard deviation above the mean minus the SEM on an Intelligence Test*,
AND

Demonstrate

Superior Ability* by: Display of work, Audition,

Performance or Exhibition
AND


Attain a sufficient score** on an individual or group Test of Creative Ability*
OR

Attain a sufficient performance rating** on a Checklist of Creative Behaviors*


Attain a superior performance rating** on a

Checklist of Behaviors*


* From ODE-approved list of instruments

** ODE established scores

TESTING
The Ohio Department of Education has established a group of nationally normed, standardized tests acceptable for gifted identification. The Ohio Achievement Tests (OAT) are not on this list and cannot be used in identifying gifted children. The OAT measures mastery of minimum grade level standards and is not able to determine maximum potential ability. Therefore, the OAT may not be used for gifted identification and service placement.
Currently, Southwest Licking Local School District tests children using instruments approved by the state. Every child is tested in grades 2, 5, and 7 using the Terra Nova Achievement Test and InView Test of Abilities. These instruments allow for students to be screened or identified as gifted in reading, mathematics, science, social studies, and/or superior cognitive ability. Students with scores at the levels indicated on the previous page are identified as gifted. Students with scores that are close will be reevaluated to determine if additional testing is necessary. See the chart on the following page for more details. Parents and teachers may request retesting if they think the scores received are incorrect. Additional student information will be reviewed and a determination will be made whether further testing is appropriate.
In addition to district provided testing opportunities, other instruments may be used for identifying students as gifted and talented. High School students scoring at or above the 95th percentile in any section of the ACT or SAT tests will be identified as gifted in that area. Similarly, elementary and middle school students who take the EXPLORE, SAT, or ACT test early as part of a program such as the Midwest Academic Talent Search may be identified as gifted if they earn a qualifying score as designated by the Ohio Department of Education.

TESTING PROCESS

Whole Grade Screening

Grades 2, 5, 7



Individual Nomination

Permission to Test

Individual Screening

Identified as Gifted

Permission for Additional Assessment

Additional Assessment

Not Identified as Gifted

93-94 on reading, math, science, social studies or total battery on Terra Nova OR 124 CSI on InView

< 93 on Terra Nova subject tests OR < than 124 CSI on InView

< 93 on achievement test subject tests OR < than 124 CSI on cognitive test


93-94 on reading, math, science, social studies or total battery on achievement test OR 124 CSI on cognitive test


< 95 on achievement test subject tests OR < than 127-130 SAI on cognitive test (depends on test)


>= 95 on achievement test subject tests OR > than 127-130 CSI on cognitive test (depends on test)


>= 95 on achievement test subject tests OR > than 127-130 CSI on cognitive test (depends on test)

>= 95 on Terra Nova subject tests OR >= than 129 CSI on InView




Option 1

Option 2

Characteristics of the Gifted/Talented



Superior Cognitive Ability

High ability students identified by an ability score (IQ) of about 127 or above


  • Advanced vocabulary for age

  • Independent reading, frequent preference for adult-level books

  • Rapid learning and easy recall

  • Quick perception of cause-effect relationships

  • High level of curiosity

  • Enjoyment of being with older children

  • Pursuit of interests and of collecting things

  • Long attention span for age

  • Preference for new and challenging experiences

  • Retention of information

  • High level of planning, problem solving, and abstract thinking compared to peers

  • Ability to generalize quickly from principles and to look for similarities and differences

  • Possession of an unusually large storehouse of information about a variety of topics

  • Tendency to become easily bored with routine tasks

  • Concern for ethical issues, questions of right and wrong, and “adult” topics such as religion and politics


Specific Academic Ability

Knowledgeable in a specific area. Identified with an achievement score of 95th percentile or above on a standardized test in reading, writing, math, science, or social studies.


  • Long attention span for activities related to a specific academic area

  • Advanced understanding of concepts, methods, and terminology of the subject

  • Ability to apply concepts from the subject to activities in other subjects

  • Willingness to devote a large among of time and effort to achieve high standards in subject

  • Competitiveness and motivation in subject

  • Rapid learning in subject


Creativity

Highly imaginative. Identified by an ability score of about 111 AND an approved score on a creative abilities checklist.


  • Inquisitiveness

  • Tendency to do things their own way

  • Preference for working alone

  • Experimentation with whatever is at hand

  • Active imagination

  • Ability to think up many ways to accomplish goal or solve a problem

  • Tendency to respond with unexpected, clever, or smart aleck answers

  • Production of original ideas

  • Uninhibited expression of what may be non-conforming opinions

  • Adventurousness and willingness to take risks

  • Possession of a keen sense of humor

  • Sensitivity to beauty

  • Nonconformity and lack of interest in detail

  • Lack of concern with social acceptability


Visual/Performing Arts – Music

Unusually advanced talent for the chronological age. Identified by a checklist AND superior performance or exhibition.


  • Makes up original tunes

  • Enjoys and seeks out musical activities and opportunities to hear and create music

  • Respond sensitively to music and move body in accord with tempo and mood changes

  • Easily remember and reproduce melodies and rhythm patterns

  • Pick out and discuss background sounds, chords, and individual instruments played

  • Play a musical instrument or express a strong desire to do so

  • Have good pitch


Visual/Performing Arts – Art

Unusually advanced talent for the chronological age. Identified by a checklist AND superior performance or exhibition.


  • Fill in extra time by drawing, painting, etc.

  • Demonstrate extraordinary imagination

  • Draws a variety of things – not just people, houses, and flowers

  • Remember things in detail

  • Take art activities seriously

  • Have long attention span for art activities

  • Plan the composition of artwork

  • Experiment with different media and techniques

  • Arrive at unique solutions to artistic problems

  • Produce highly original work with distinctive style, balance, and unity

  • Demonstrate accelerated development of technical skill in art

  • Show adeptness at representing movement

  • Ask for explanations and instruction

  • Respond to unusual subjects in art

  • Are keen observers

  • Set high standards of quality and rework their creations to achieve these standards

  • Show interest in other children’s products by spending time discussing and studying them



*Adapted from Kitano, Margie K. and Kirby, Darrell F., Gifted Education: A Comprehensive View. Boston: Little, Brown, 1986.



BRIGHT CHILD GIFTED LEARNER

1. Knows the answers. 1. Asks the questions

2. Is interested 2. Is highly curious

3. Is attentive. 3. Is mentally and physically involved

4. Has good ideas 4. Has wild, silly ideas

5. Works hard 5. Plays around, yet tests well

6. Answers the questions. 6. Discusses in detail, elaborates

7. Top group. 7. Beyond the group

8. Listens with interest 8. Shows strong feelings and opinions

9. Learns with ease 9. Already knows

10. 6-8 repetitions for mastery 10. 1-2 repetitions for mastery

11. Understands ideas 11. Constructs abstractions

12. Enjoys peers 12. Prefers adults

13. Grasps the meaning 13. Draws inferences

14. Completes assignments 14. Initiates projects

15. Is receptive 15. Is intense

16. Copies accurately 16. Creates a new design

17. Enjoys school 17. Enjoys learning

18. Absorbs information 18. Manipulates information

19. Technician 19. Inventor

20. Good memorizer 20. Good guesser

21. Enjoys straightforward, 21. Thrives on complexity

sequential presentation

22. Is alert 22. Is keenly observant

23. Is pleased with own learning. 23. Is highly self-critical


**The traits listed may or may not accurately indicate giftedness. Gifted identification is determined by formal testing as guided by state and local policy.

CHARACTERISTICS FOR HELPING TO IDENTIFY GIFTED STUDENTS



Positive Characteristics/

Behaviors




Negative Characteristics/

Behaviors

  • able to generate many ideas to solutions and problems

Fluency

lots of ideas



  • may dominate others

  • may have difficulty bringing task to closure

  • has high tolerance for ambiguity

Flexibility

variety of ideas



  • may be impatient with details or restrictions

  • able to express ideas in unique and unusual ways

Originality

unique or original ideas



  • may be considered unusual or "silly" by peers and teachers

  • may refuse to accept authority and be non-conforming

  • able to add detail beyond expectations

Elaboration

incorporates descriptive details



  • intensely interested in a wide variety of things

  • asks many questions

Curiosity

perceptive, intuitive.

asks many questions


  • may interrupt or ignore classroom activities to pursue individual interests

  • uses fun and fantasy to enhance learning and exploration

Imagination

uses imagination for pleasure and problem solving



  • may be considered unproductive and "silly"

  • has knowledge which is unusually advanced for age

Knowledge

wide range of information, high level of conceptualization



  • may be intolerant of others

  • may become inhibited in sharing information

  • above average

  • able to progress at a more rapid pace

Skills

above-average mastery of skills

processes information quickly and easily


  • may dominate others because of abilities

  • may be bored with routine and repetitive tasks

  • relates positively to peers and adults

Social Relationships

responds and relates to others



  • may have difficulty relating to peers and adults

  • persistent, self-motivated and able to stay on task

Task Commitment

demonstrates a commitment to a task

or goal


  • may have difficulty bringing task to closure

by Judy Luker



SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF GIFTED CHILDREN WITH DUAL EXCEPTIONALITIES
Characteristics of Gifted Students with Specific Disabilities
Gifted Students with Visual Impairment

  • Fast rate of learning

  • Superior memory

  • Superior verbal communication skills and vocabulary

  • Advanced problem-solving skills

  • Creative production or thought that may progress more slowly
    than sighted students in some academic areas

  • Ease in learning Braille

  • Great persistence

  • Motivation to know

  • Sometimes slower rate of cognitive development than sighted students

  • Excellent ability to concentrate

(Whitmore & Maker, 1985)
Gifted Students with Physical Disabilities

  • Development of compensatory skills

  • Creativity in finding alternate ways of communicating and accomplishing tasks

  • Impressive store of knowledge

  • Advanced academic skills

  • Superior memory

  • Exceptional problem-solving skills

  • Rapid grasp of ideas

  • Ability to set and strive for long-term goals

  • Greater maturity than age mates

  • Good sense of humor

  • Persistence, patience

  • Motivation to achieve

  • Curiosity, insight

  • Self-criticism and perfectionism

  • Cognitive development that may not be based on direct experience

  • Possible difficulty with abstractions

  • Possible limited achievement due to pace of work
    (Cline, 1999; Whitmore & Maker, 1985; Willard-Holt, 1994)


Gifted Students with Hearing Impairments

  • Development of speech-reading skills without instruction

  • Early reading ability

  • Excellent memory

  • Ability to function in the regular school setting

  • Rapid grasp of ideas

  • High reasoning ability

  • Superior performance in school

  • Wide range of interests

  • Nontraditional ways of getting information

  • Use of problem-solving skills in everyday situations

  • Possibly on grade level

  • Delays in concept attainment

  • Self starters

  • Good sense of humor

  • Enjoyment of manipulating environment

  • Intuition

  • Ingenuity in solving problems

  • Symbolic language abilities (different symbol system)
    (Cline, 1999; Whitmore & Maker, 1985)


Gifted Students with Learning Disabilities

  • High abstract reasoning ability

  • Good mathematical reasoning ability

  • Keen visual memory, spatial skills

  • Advanced vocabulary

  • Sophisticated sense of humor

  • Imaginative and creative

  • Insightful

  • Exceptional ability in geometry, science, arts, music

  • Good problem-finding and -solving skills

  • Difficulty with memorization, computation, phonics, and/or spelling

  • Distractibility and/or disorganization

  • Supersensitivity

  • Perfectionism

  • Grasp of metaphors, analogies, satire

  • Comprehension of complex systems

  • Unreasonable self expectations

  • Often, failure to complete assignments

  • Difficulties with sequential tasks

  • Wide variety of interests
    (Baum, Owen, & Dixon, 1991; Silverman, 1989)


ADD/ADHD Issues

Research indicates that in many cases, a child is diagnosed with ADHD when in fact the child is gifted and reacting to an inappropriate curriculum (Webb & Latimer, 1993). The key to distinguishing between the two is the pervasiveness of the "acting out" behaviors. If the acting out is specific to certain situations, the child's behavior is more likely related to giftedness; whereas, if the behavior is consistent across all situations, the child's behavior is more likely related to ADHD. It is also possible for a child to be BOTH gifted and ADHD. The following lists highlight the similarities between giftedness and ADHD.



Characteristics of Gifted Students Who Are Bored

  • Poor attention and daydreaming when bored

  • Low tolerance for persistence on tasks that seem irrelevant

  • Begin many projects, see few to completion

  • Development of judgment lags behind intellectual growth

  • Intensity may lead to power struggles with authorities

  • High activity level; may need less sleep

  • Difficulty restraining desire to talk; may be disruptive

  • Question rules, customs, and traditions

  • Lose work, forget homework, are disorganized

  • May appear careless

  • Highly sensitive to criticism

  • Do not exhibit problem behaviors in all situations

  • More consistent levels of performance at a fairly consistent pace
    (Cline, 1999; Webb & Latimer, 1993)


Characteristics of Students with ADHD

  • Poorly sustained attention

  • Diminished persistence on tasks not having immediate consequences

  • Often shift from one uncompleted activity to another

  • Impulsivity, poor delay of gratification

  • Impaired adherence to commands to regulate or inhibit behavior in social contexts

  • More active, restless than other children

  • Often talk excessively

  • Often interrupt or intrude on others (e.g., butt into games)

  • Difficulty adhering to rules and regulations

  • Often lose things necessary for tasks or activities at home or school

  • May appear inattentive to details

  • Highly sensitive to criticism

  • Problem behaviors exist in all settings, but in some are more severe

  • Variability in task performance and time used to accomplish tasks.
    (Barkley, 1990; Cline, 1999; Webb & Latimer, 1993)


Questions to Ask in Differentiating between Giftedness and ADHD

  • Could the behaviors be responses to inappropriate placement, insufficient challenge, or lack of intellectual peers?

  • Is the child able to concentrate when interested in the activity?

  • Have any curricular modifications been made in an attempt to change inappropriate behaviors?

  • Has the child been interviewed? What are his/her feelings about the behaviors?

  • Does the child feel out of control? Do the parents perceive the child as being out of control?

  • Do the behaviors occur at certain times of the day, during certain activities, with certain teachers or in certain environments?


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