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TEACHER ENCOURAGEMENT OF PARENT INVOLVEMENT



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TEACHER ENCOURAGEMENT OF PARENT INVOLVEMENT

Teachers welcome ideas, questions, or concerns as a means to establish effective communication among parents, educators, and the students. Recognizing the involvement of the parent(s) or guardian(s) is essential in the education of the gifted child, teachers can encourage parents to become involved in their child’s education.


Parents can participate in the education of gifted children in a variety of ways including:


  1. Joining PACE –Parents and others for Academic Challenge and Excellence

  2. Keeping abreast of what is happening in the gifted classroom

  3. Communicating any concerns directly with the gifted teacher or other teacher providing services

  4. Becoming aware of student interests in areas outside the curriculum

  5. Encouraging student participation in activities that are a part of the gifted classroom. Some of these activities may not be a part of the normal school day

  6. Assisting students with library, research, and study skills

  7. Visiting the class to see what is happening

  8. Working to become a mentor to other students in the programs and/or recommending mentors

  9. Volunteering in the classroom

  10. Becoming acquainted with resources relating to gifted education such as those included at the end of this manual

  11. Attending the Ohio Association of Gifted Children Conference held each fall



PARENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES

Parent-teacher conferences will be held at various times throughout the year. Conferences may be requested by the parents or the teacher as needed.



PACE

Parents and others for Academic Challenge and Excellence invite any interested community members to attend their monthly meetings. Having a child in Voyage or Challenge is not required for participation. The intent of the group is to improve services to high achieving students by supporting advanced courses and opportunities to help children develop to their full potential. Parents are also able to discuss with other parents issues relevant to raising and coping with gifted children.


RESOURCES
Books

Adderholdt, M., Goldberg, J. (100). Perfectionism: What’s bad about being too good? Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing

Delisle, J. (2006). Parenting gifted kids: Tips for raising happy and successful children. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

Delisle, J. R. & Galbraith, J. (2002). When gifted kids don’t have all the answers. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.

Delisle, J., & Lewis, B. A. (2003). The survival guide for teachers of gifted kids. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing

Galbraith, J. (1999). The gifted kid’s survival guide: A teen handbook. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing

Galbraith, J. & Delisle, J. (1996). The gifted kid’s survival guide: For ages 10 and under. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing

Heacox, D. (2001). Differentiating instruction in the regular classroom: How to reach and teach all learners. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.

Kerr, B. A. (1997). Smart girls. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.

Kerr, B. A. & Cohen, S. J. (2001). Smart boys. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.

Kingore, B. (2001). The Kingore observation inventory (2nd Ed.) Austin, TX: Professional Associates Publishing.

Matthews, D. J. & Foster, J. F. (2004). Being smart about gifted kids: A handbook for parents and educators. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.

McCune, Diane. Gifted goes thinking. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.

Nichols, J., Thomson, S., Wolfe, M., & Merritt, D. (1997). Primary education thinking skills. Dayton, OH: Pieces of Learning.

Nichols, J., Thomson, S., Wolfe, M., & Merritt, D. (1998). Primary education thinking skills 2. Dayton, OH: Pieces of Learning.

Nichols, J., Thomson, S., Wolfe, M., & Merritt, D. (2001). Primary education thinking skills 3. Dayton, OH: Pieces of Learning.

Parker, J. (1989). Instructional strategies for teaching the gifted. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon, Inc.

Rakow, S. (2005). Educating gifted students in middle school: A Practical Guide. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

Rogers, K. (2002). Reforming gifted education. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.

Smutny, J. F., Walker, S. Y., & Meckstroth, E. A. (1997). Teaching young gifted kids in the regular classroom. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.

Strip, C.A. & Hirsch, G. (2000). Helping gifted children soar. A practical guide for parents and teachers. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.

Tomlinson, C. (1999). The differentiated classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Tomlinson, C. (2003). Differentiation in practice: A resource guide for differentiating curriculum grades K-5. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Tomlinson, C. (2003). Differentiation in practice: A resource guide for differentiating curriculum grades 5-9. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Tomlinson, C. (2003). Fulfilling the promise of the differentiated classroom. Alexandria,

VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Tomlinson, C. (1995). How to differentiate instruction in mixed ability classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

VanTassel-Baska, J. (1988). Comprehensive curriculum for gifted learners. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, Inc.

Walker, S. Y. (2002). The survival guide for parents of gifted kids. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.

Webb, J.T. (2005). Misdiagnosis and dual diagnoses of gifted children and adults: ADHD, bipolar, OCD, Asperger’s, depression, and other disorders. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.

Winebrenner, S. (2001). Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.

Wyatt, S., & Merritt, D. (2007). PETS Kindergarten. Dayton, OH: Pieces of Learning.

Colangelo, N., Assouline, S.G., Gross, M.U.M. (2004). A nation deceived: How schools hold back their brightest students Iowa City, IA: Templeton Foundation.
Magazines

Gifted Child Quarterly Parenting for High Potential

Journal for the Education of the Gifted Gifted Child Today

Journal of Secondary Gifted Education Creative Kids
Web Sites

Nat'l Assoc. for Gifted Children (NAGC) www.nagc.org

Ohio Assoc. of Gifted Children (OACG) www.oagc.com

Social Emotional Needs of Gifted (SENG) www.sengifted.org

Hoagies' Gifted Page www.hoagiesgifted.org

Gifted Development Center www.gifteddevelopment.com

Genius Denied www.geniusdenied.org

GT-Cybersource www.gt-cybersource.org

Nat'l Research Center on Gifted &Talented www.gifted.uconn.edu/nrcgt.html

Center for Gifted Education cfge.wm.edu/curriculumresources.php

Gifted Online Conferences www.neiu.edu/~ourgift/index.html

Bertie Kingore www.bertiekingore.com

Prufrock Press www.prufrock.com

Great Potential Press www.giftedbooks.com

Pieces of Learning www.piecesoflearning.com:
Nancy Polette Literature Guides www.nancypolette.com/litguides.asp

Interact Simulations www.interact-simulations.com



GEMS Math and Science www.lhs.berkeley.edu/gems/GEMS.html




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