The Dutch families of Losee, Koeck, Denton & Brush in New York, mid 1600's


NYC CENSUS “…Original tax assessment rolls complied in 1703 and a census taken in the



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1703 NYC CENSUS “…Original tax assessment rolls complied in 1703 and a census taken in the

same year…In addition to names, these lists provide the estimated value of the estate and number of bondsmen and dependents for the city’s householders and tenants….independent residents or heads of households in Manhattan’s five central wards, the East, West, North, South, and Dock.”


New York City, 1664-1710 Conquest and Change, Thomas J Archdeacon, p 43

Regarding Losee in these records, Abigail Ann Losee's father, Simon Losee lived at Osyter Bay, Long Island and which was not enumerated in the "Ward's" of New York City.” Isabelle Cluff



Documentary History of the State of New York, by E. B. O'Callaghan, p 612

Albany, 1849. [Contains entire 1703 census of New York City][I HAVE THIS.]

1704 New York "Mr. Burroughs went with me to Vendue where I bought about one hundred Rheem of paper which was



retaken in a fly-boat from Holland and sold very reasonably here - some ten, some eight shillings per Rheem by the Lott, which was ten Rheem in a Lott. And at the Vendue I made a great many acquaintances amongst the good women of the town, who courteously invited me to their houses and generously entertained me.

Madam Knight, a unique character from Boston, kept a journal, in wjhich ahe describes certain things in New York in 1704:…

The Cittie of New Yorke is a pleasant, well compacted place, situated on a Commoditous River which is a fine harbour for shipping. The buildings, brick generally, very stately and high, though not altogether like ours in Boston. The bricks in some of the houses are of divers coullers and laid in checkers, being glazed, look very agreeable. The inside of them are neat to admiration, the wooden work, for only the walls are plastered, and the Summers and Gist are plained and kept very white scower'd as so is all the partitions if made of Bords. The fire-places have no Jambs (as ours have) But the Backs run flush with the walls, and the Hearth is of Tyles and is as farr out into the room at the ends as before the fire, which is Generally Five foot in the Lower rooms, and the piece over where the mantle tree should be is made as ours with joyners work, and as I suppose is fasten'd with iron rodds inside. The House where the Vendue was, had Chimney Corners like ours, and they and the hearths were laid with the finest that I ever see, and the stair cases laid all with white tile which is ever clean, and so are the walls of the kitchen which had a brick floor. They were making great preparations to Receive their Governor, Lord Cornbury from the Jereseys, and for that end raised the militia to Gard him on shore to the fort".

"They are Generally of the Church of England, and have a New England Gentle­man for their minister, and a very fine Church, set out with all customary requisites. There are also a Dutch and Divers Conventicles as they call them, viz., Baptists, Quakers etc. They are not strict in keeping the. Sabbath as in Boston and other places where I had bin, But seem to Deal with great exactness as farr as I see or Deall with. They are sociable to one another and Courteous and civill to strangers and fare well in their houses".

The English go fasheonable in their dress. But the Dutch, especially the middling sort, differ from our women; in their habitt go loose; were French muches, which are like a Capp and a head-band in one, leaving their ears bare, which are sett out with jewells of a large size and many in number. And their fingers hoop't with rings, some with large stones in them of many Coullers, as were their pendants in their ears, which you should see very old women wear as well as young".

They have Vendues very frequently and make their earnings very well by them, for they treat with good Liquor Liberally, and the customers drink as Liberally, and generally pay for't as well, by paying for that which they Bidd up Briskly for, after the sack has gone plentifully about, though sometimes good penny worths are got there".

"Their diversions in the winter is Riding Sleys about three or four Miles out of Town, where they have houses of entertainment at a place called the Bowery, and some go to friends houses who handsomely treat them. Mr. Burroughs carry'd his Spouse and Danghter and myself out to one Madame Dowes, a Gentlewoman who lived at a farm house, who gave us a handsome entertainment of five or six dishes and choice Beer and metheglin, Cyder, etc., all of which she said was the produce of her farm; I believe we met fifty or sixty slays that day; they fly with great swiftness and some are so furious that they will turn out of the path for none except a Loaden Cart. Nor do they spare for any diversion the place affords, and sociable to a degree, they'r Tables being as free to their Naybours as to themselves". ­

Private Journal kept by Madam Knight in a Journey from Boston to New York in the year 1704, pp. 66-71.- Quoted from Dix, 159.

Found in - Ecclesiastical Records, State of NY, Hugh Hastings p 1550-1551

His Lordship has been pleased to encourage Religion, and discountenance Vice in the said Province by Proclamation, and has used his utmost endeavors to promote the Public Worship of God, and train up youth in the Doctrine and discipline of tile Church of England, particularly in the city of New York, and hath contributed to the building a French Church. And since the death of the late minister of the French Church. Resolves to use his interest to introduce a French Minister that shall have Episcopal ordination and conform to the constitution of the church.” [no french minister?]



“… a law for establishing, A Latin free school…”

Two other schools are likewise established in this City by his Excellency’s care…”



Ecclesiastical Records, State of NY, Hugh Hastings p 1552

1704 New York City The French Church (l'Eglise du St. Esprit) was built "on the north side of Pine St.

east of Nassau."

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

Scattered through all of this old cemetery are many field stones. Ther were all examined, but no markings distinct enough to record were found on any except those which appear in the above list. When the old cemetery was worked over in 1938 all small markers which were found were set up. Many of the ancient burials were made with just simple pieces of field stone with no markings at all on them”

Trinity Church & Huguenot Burial Records from New Rochelle.” Fiche #6075869

1704 New York “…the Inhabitants of this Province are of three nations, English, Dutch and French; of



these three the Dutch are very much the most numerous, and these are not Dutch by nation only by inclination, at least generally speaking, which appears here every day.

The French have during the disorders which have been happening here formerly always espoused the Interest of the English; among the English in this City there are a great many good men, but in the Countrey especially in Long Island most of the English are Dissenters, being for the most part people who have removed from New England and Connecticut, who are in no wise fond of monarchy, soe that they naturally incline to incroach as often as they can, upon the Prerogative; soe it is noe wonder if they are willing to extend the power of their Assemblys as far as they can. How far it will be for the interest of the Crown to suffer them to doe it.”



Ecclesiastical Records, State of NY, Hugh Hastings p 1592

1705 New York City Paving was ordered laid, south end of Broad Street & about the dock & custom house.

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1706 May 4 West Indies Andrew Lamoureux, captain of a merchantman "being lately master of a sloop was

before unfortunately taken by French Privateer in the West Indies, and having procured his releasement Shipt himself at Curasoa on board the Sloop Orange in order for his transportation hither, but that upon his arrival here he was impreset to serve on board her Maj-ties Ship Triton Prize"

"You are hereby required to re-lease the sd [said] Lamoureux from her Maj-ties sd ship and service..."

Letter to Capt Miles from "His Excy Edward Viscount Cornbury"

Fort Anne, NY Harbor 1706 NY Colonial Manuscripts Vol 51 p 125B

NY State Archives Referred to in the 1919 Record of L. Family
"...there were traders...New York... men whose small sloops and schooners plied up and down the seaboard and into the West Indies." "…only to British ports and ship... only in British vessels" "Navagation Acts... stiff taxes... guaranteed markets, naval protection, and a network of credit."

The American Revolution, Edward Countryman, p19-20

"Privateers ... were privately owned ships whose crew members had written permission ... to attack and seize any [enemy] ship during war. If the privateers were captured ... the sailors were supposed to be treated as prisoners of war. ... without the necessary permission letter . ... the crew could be tried for piracy... Privateer crews were allowed to sell the cargoes of ships they captured and divide the money among the sailors according to a prearranged formula. They also could keep the captured ships, outfit them for privateering, and put them to work."



Those Remarkable Women of the American Revolution, Karen Zeinert, p60
1706 Summer New York City "The city ... was much disturbed by the danger of an attack by French Privateers."

[1702-1713 In America called, Queen Ann's War; in Europe called, War of Spanish Succession]

"... reports that a French squadron under d'Iberville was coming to attack the city. One French privateer actually entered the Harbor." p 187

"The Atlantic had never been free from pirates, but during the war with France (the so-called William's War) their number had increased greatly. Many ships sailed under the commission of a privateer, though in reality a pirate. Large fortunes were made, and many of the pirates hailed from New York, where they were well received by people of quality."

The fort at the tip of the island was called several different names. Some of these include "Fort James" when James was in charge, then "Fort Anne", and "Fort George at the time of the Revolutionary War. It was the center of social and official New York.

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, I.N. Phelps Stokes, NY

"The court house records divide commerce into four spheres of activity: the importation of general merchandise, of rum, and of wine, and the exportation of furs. Each entry identifies the merchant responsible for the shipment and notes the value of the cargo and the duties paid in the case of imported rum and wine and exported furs. Using these figures, ... we can ...measure the extent of by individual merchants ..." p 60

[Mr Archdeacon divides merchants into economic groups.] "These least active importers and exporters usually obtained products for their own use or engaged in small speculative ventures to supplement their main source of income. They pursued a variety of non mercantile occupations, but most frequently identified themselves as master, or ship' captains.

"Masters engaged in commerce may often have been dealing in small parcels of trading goods given to them by merchants as primage to encourage the careful and expedient handling of their cargoes. In some cases, however, the masters did not import or export in their own vessels. This latter pattern suggests that they were as much part-time shippers who used their special knowledge to make promising small investments as they were 'merchants of opportunity' who only occasionally obtained items for trade."p 63

"... three-masted ships which were the mainstay of the transatlantic route. ... sloops ... dominated the West Indian and the mainland intercolonial trade.... 50 tons, near the maximum for this class of single-masted vessel which carried a yard or two of topsail as well as a fore-and-aft mainsail." p 67

"... some top New York merchants held shares in vessels." "Enterprising merchants also underwrote the privateering expeditions which began in New York in the 1690's. Respectable citizens found tempting the legal booty made available by the war with France and by the struggles against pirates." "Captain William ... Kidd was a man of standing in New York" before he was executed for piracy. Piracy and smuggling were a problem p 68

"European vessels visited New York most frequently in the blustery months between November and April. London had become the key point of contact in the city's transatlantic trade. ... of the 21 which dropped anchor in the harbor during 1701 and 1702, 18 identified London and 3 Bristol as their terminal ports.

"Sloops and brigs from the West Indies, the Atlantic Islands of the Azores and Madeira, and South America appeared in the city mostly in the spring months of April, May, June and in August." p 69

"Ships from other mainland English colonies crowed New York in August but also maintained contact during the other months." p 70

New York City, 1664 - 1710 Conquest and Change, Thomas J Archdeacon, 1976.

1708 Jan 21 New York City Gerret Dusjean, son of Gerret Dusjean and Elizabeth Lamoureux,

(dau of Andre') is baptized in the Dutch Reformed Church

"The Lamoureux Record", Oct 1919, AJ Lamoureux

1708 Mar NYC Lord Lovelace replaces Gov. Cornbury in Mar; he arrives in Dec. The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1708 Dec NYC Lord Lovelace arrives in Dec. The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1709 May NYC Lord Lovelace dies. Richard Ingoldsby fills in The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1709 June 4-6 New Rochelle “The French Church if New Rochelle, per Rev Mr Bondet, to Col Heath… offering to

conform to the Church of England.” “…in full conformity with the National Church of England… trust of your candor, sincerity & charity for the Refugee Protestants…”

Signed by 29 members of congregation.

Ecclesiastical Records, State of NY, Hugh Hastings p 1751

[Did Lamoreaux, Chaperon or etc sign this petition?]
1710 NY Census "…the very inaccurate census of 1710” is mentioned as "so unreliable that some have

discarded it altogether. It seems that the census taker did not speak French and made many mistakes.

"Early History of the Sicasrd-Secor Family" by H.G. Gray p 313

NY Genealogical & Biographical Record, v 66, Oct 1937

1710 abt Wheatly, L.I., NY Margaret Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married Sampson Crooker, 26 Oct 1730

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1710 June New York, NY Robert Hunter called as governor till 1719 New York City, 1664 - 1710 Conquest and Change, Archdeacon

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1711 NYC In common council a market place is established. The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1711 abt Wheatly, L.I., NY Mary Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married William Walters, 7 Dec 1728 – says chr 17 June 1722

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1712 NY A census of New York was taken in 1712 ... 5,840 people The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

History of Westchester Co, NY, From Early Settlement..., Shonnard, & Spooner

1712 abt Flatbush, L.I., NY Elizabeth Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married Joseph Ireland, 1735 – died 22 Apr 1802

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1713 abt of Queens Co., NBr Elizabeth and Jane (Jannettje) Losee, twins born to Simon Losee Jr & Margaret Koeck

Earlier record shows them born E abt 1712 & J abt 1731

Later married E- Joseph Ireland – about 1835[1753] J-Jehannes Boorum – 18 May 1853

Family Group Sheet by Isabelle Lamoreaux Cluff

1714 abt Flatbush, L.I., NY Sarah Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married John Haff – died before May 1760

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1714 Oct England Queen Anne dies, George I is King


The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1716 New York “John Fontaine, passing through New York in 1716 attended services twice at the



French church. States, ‘The church is very large and beautiful and within it there was

a very great congregation.’ He also speaks of a French club exieting in New York at that time.

New York French Church records, Staten Island, New York, 1694-1886



LDS Film #509,193

1716 abt Flatbush, L.I., NY Lawrence Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Live in 1763

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1718 New York "As the French population increased rapidly from the flood of Huguenot refugees,

a new church was needed. A fine stone structure was erected on King Street (now Pine Street)." [This was before 1719.]

"The Masse' & Mercereau Families" by Kimball S Erdman

[Find a better reference and time for this last entry.]
1718 abt Flatbush, Kings Co., N.Br Peter Losee is born to Simon Losee Jr & Margaret Koeck

Later married 1) Abigeltje Lewis about 1739 [or 1753]

2)___ said to have been in Dutchess Co, NY

Family Group Sheet by Isabelle Lamoreaux Cluff

1718 abt Oyster Bay, L.I. New York Pieter Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott -America/ Europe,

Flatbush, Kings, NY Pieter Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married 1) Abigeltje Lewis

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

[She lists their marriage date as 5 Mar 1759. Lists Huntington Church records.]
1719 Jan 29 Wheatly, NY "Simon Losee bought land at Wheatley, Long Island

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott- America/ Europe,

1719 abt Wheatly, L.I., NY Simon Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married Phebe Lewis

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1720 abt Wheatly, L.I., NY Ann Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married Josiah Totten or Isaiah Totten, 3 Apr 1734

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1720 Duchess Co, NY Daniel Lamoreaux Settled in Duchess Co, NY in 1720

Bard's History of French Huguenots in America as quoted in

"The Life Story of David Burlock Lamoreaux", by Edith Ivans Lamoreaux, p 2
"Once English became the vehicular language of the Huguenots, they changed their church affiliation from their French speaking churches to American congregations. Most of them identified themselves with the Establishment Church in the Colonies, the Episcopal Church; a minority became members of the Presbyterian Church which is, like the Huguenots themselves, based on Calvinist Reformation."

A Brief History of the Huguenots, Rev Herbert L Stein-Schneideer

1720 May New York, NYC William Burnet is Governor, "his transference to Mass. in 1728 was brought

about by enemies whome he had made through interfering in a quarrel between factions in the French Church ... and by his stopping the French trade."

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

"In 1695, after the return of political calm, the city expanded it's electoral base by reducing the fee for purchasing a freemanship, which authorized it's holder to carry on his business and to vote. ... the new fee was set at ninepence (9d.) for persons living in the city since 1686. But many New Yorkers were reluctant to pay even this modest charge, ...

Thomas J Archdeacon, New York City, 1664 - 1710 Conquest and Change,
1722 abt of Oysterbay, Nassau, NY Abigeltje Lewis is born

Later married Peter Losee

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1722 Aug 15 New York “In the name of God, Amen. I, ELIAS NEAU, of New York, merchant, being sick. I give and bequeath to the Parish Church and Corporation of the Church of England, called Trinity Church, the sum of ¤20.



“I leave to the Poor of the French Church, being Refugees, residing in the city of New York, ¤20.

I leave to Rev. Mr. Daniel Bondet, the present minister at New Rochelle, and to Rev. Lewis Row, minister of the French Congregation in New York, to each ¤10. To Rev. Mr. Thomas Poyer, minister at Jamaica, on Nassau Island, and to Rev. Mr. Jenny, Chaplain to the Forces at Fort George, in New York, to each ¤5. …



"I give the sum of ¤50 for and towards the printing of 152 Hymns, composed by myself; which said sum of money I desire may be deposited in the hands of Rev. Mr. Lewis Row, minister of the French Church in New York, for the better effecting, and printing said Hymns in the French Language."

I leave to Rev. Mr. William Vesey, Rector of Trinity Church, ¤25, and to Alexander Moore, of New York, ¤20, for their trouble in supervising this will. …



Dated, August 15, 1722 - Witnesses, Anthony Byvanck, Elisha Bonett, William Huddlestone.

Proved, September 17, 1722.

Isabelle Cluff"

Ancestry.com, Full Context of New York City Wills, 1708-28, Page 329

1723 New York City, ,NY A colonial census is taken population of the city is 7,248 The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

Shonnard & Spooner History of Westchester Co, NY, From Early Settlement...,

1723-1725 New York City There is "an unfortunate quarrel in the New York City French Church" over church

government. "Which caused the withdrawal of a number of families, some of whom went to New Rochelle. Among these" were Daniel & Jeanne Lamoureux.

The Lamoureux Record edited by AJ Lamoureux, Oct 1919, p 4

New York William Burnet was Governor, "his transference to Mass. in 1728 was brought about by

enemies whome he had made through interfering in a quarrel between factions in the French Church ... and by his stopping the French trade."

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

"This controversy seems to have been over the Dutch Reformed or Episcopalian affiliation of the Huguenot Church." pp 30-41.

Rev. A V Wittmeyer An Historical Sketch of L'elgise Francoise a Nouvelle York...,

[English government in NY wanted all churches to have a more Anglican church format. akrc]
"The Lamoureux apparently sided with the Episcopalian faction."

"Current View of Daniel Lamoreaux" by David Kendall Martin,

1725 abt Wheatly, L.I., NY Charity Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married Timothy Titus

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1725 Nov 1 New York, NYC "First Newspaper ever published in New York, 'The New- York Gazette,' a weekly" The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

"These early settlers, associating almost wholly with one another, held to their own language till nearly the middle of the century, if we may judge from the church records and their petition to have a French minister ..." [Speaking of the early New Rochelle settlers.]

"Early History of the Sicasrd-Secor Family" by H.G. Gray

NY Genealogical & Biographical Record, v 66, Oct 1937

"Shortly after the conformation to the Episcopal Church, [1710? or later?] a schism arose ... 'The seceders erected a meeting-house, styled themselves The French Protestant Congregation, and remained violently opposed to their lawful pastors; ...

Rev Pierre Stouppe ... writes: 'Dutch and Lutheran families generally unite with the church when the service is performed in English, & they bring their children to be baptized by the French Ministers.' New Rochelle, as well as Fordham, was considered within the spiritual jurisdiction of Westchester Village, then the only parish in the country. The French Church was named Trinity, and received, at the time, a charter from George the third, dated 1766."



The French Blood in America, L. J. Fosdick, Baltimore, 1973.

"In the 1750's participants in the Livingston-DeLancey dispute in New York City played upon the hostility between Presbyterians and Anglicans." [This seems to be a Dutch/English dispute as well as a church government dispute.]

New York City, 1664 - 1710 Conquest and Change, Thomas J Archdeacon

"The Huguenots of New Rochelle, New York, the only [group of people] still speaking French..." 1770's

Victorious in Defeat, W Brown

[Isabelle's note says, "This church was Referred to in 1753 as Trinity Church and in 1759 as The French Church.]
1726 abt Wheatly, L.I., NY Hannah Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married Seamans Albertus – also says christened 9 Nov 1753 ??

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1727Apr 7 Wheatly, L.I., NY Phebe Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married Jacob Weeks- 30 Sept 1750

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1727 England George II of Great Britain crowned.



1728 Spring New York John Mongomerie succeeded Gov. Burnet

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1729 abt Wheatly, L.I., NY Martha Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married Daniel Duryea

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1731 abt Wheatly, L.I., NY Jannetje Losee is born to Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck

Later married Johannes Boerum, 18 May 1753

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1731 New York A colonial census is taken

Shonnard & Spooner History of Westchester Co, NY, From Early Settlement...,

1736 Daniel Lamoureux family were living near Philipsburg

"The Life History of David B Lamoreaux, Edith I. Lamoreaux

Bedford, NY Daniel Lamoureux family in Bedford, NY. [Bedford is a section cut into the south part

of the Courtland Manor. See Maps.]

Duane L'Amoureux "A L'Amoureux Family History as we Approach 300 Years…

1737 New York A colonial census is taken

Shonnard & Spooner History of Westchester Co, NY, From Early Settlement...,

New York Population of New York City and County was 10,664, the bulk o f the



population still lived below Wall Street.

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

"Once English became the vehicular language of the Huguenots, they changed their church affiliation from their French speaking churches to American congregations. Most of them identified themselves with the Establishment Church in the Colonies, the Episcopal Church; a minority became members of the Presbyterian Church which is, like the Huguenots themselves, based on Calvinist Reformation."

A Brief History of the Huguenots, Rev Herbert L Stein-Schneideer,

"These early settlers, associating almost wholly with one another, held to their own language till nearly the middle of the century, if we may judge from the church records and their petition to have a French minister ..." [Speaking of the early New Rochelle settlers.]

"Early History of the Sicasrd-Secor Family" by H.G. Gray

NY Genealogical & Biographical Record, v 66, Oct 1937

The French language, which was used in all the services of the church, gradually fell into disuse; and the Huguenots of the second and third generations, understanding and speaking English better than French, naturally drifted into English speaking churches.

Eglise Francoise a la Nouvelle york, Registers of the births, marriages, and deaths from 1688 to 1804; Rev Alferd V Wittmeyer

"Shortly after the conformation to the Episcopal Church, [1710? or later?] a schism arose ... 'The seceders erected a meeting-house, styled themselves The French Protestant Congregation, and remained violently opposed to their lawful pastors; ...

Rev Pierre Stouppe ... writes: 'Dutch and Lutheran families generally unite with the church when the service is performed in English, & they bring their children to be baptized by the French Ministers.' New Rochelle, as well as Fordham, was considered within the spiritual jurisdiction of Westchester Village, then the only parish in the country. The French Church was named Trinity, and received, at the time, a charter from George the third, dated 1766."



The French Blood in America, L. J. Fosdick, Baltimore, 1973.

"In the 1750's participants in the Livingston-DeLancey dispute in New York City played upon the hostility between Presbyterians and Anglicans." [This seems to be a Dutch/English dispute as well as a church government dispute.]

New York City, 1664 - 1710 Conquest and Change, Thomas J Archdeacon

"The Huguenots of New Rochelle, New York, the only [group of people] still speaking French..." Victorious in Defeat, W Brown

1770's “The Dutch language was not abandoned at New Paltz because of an influx of English-speaking

people. Neither, may we say, had the French tongue been previously aban­doned because the Dutch element had come into the town in large numbers. No doubt the influence of church and school and of surrounding communities brought about a change in the language. The father of the writer has told him that he did not learn to speak English till he went to school. This was not an exceptional case. No doubt there were many in this community who knew no tongue but the Dutch until they went to that famous Irish schoolmaster, Gilbert Cuthbert Rice, who from about 1815 to about 1825 taught the young ideas how to shoot in different communi­ties in the vicinity of New Paltz. Quite probably the grand­parents of some of the children who thus learned to talk English had themselves known no tongue but the French until they went to school, and there from a Dutch-speaking schoolmaster and Dutch-speaking children learned to use that language.

A story that has come down to us from the old people re­lates that when the three brothers, sons of Isaac LeFevre, were living in the three stone houses on the banks of the Wallkill at Bontecoe, a child sent from one of the houses to another to borrow some article asked for it in Dutch and was indignantly told to go back home and learn to ask for it in French. This was about 1760, and the story shows that even where the children were of pure French blood, as was the case at that time with the Bontecoe LeFevres, they had somehow learned to speak in Dutch, but received a stern rebuke for using that tongue”.



History Of New Paltz, New York And Its Old Families, 1678 – 1820 By LaFevre

Many New Rochelle families came from the French Islands… St Christopher. The French made it hard for them there so they moved to New Rochelle. “Here, too, lived the first pastor of New Rochelle, David de Bonrepos.” Charles W. Baird, History of the Huguenot Emigration to America, p 211

“’Concerning those who may frequent the islands for the purpose of trade, they may be tolerated, but without any exercise whatsoever of their religion.’”



Charles W. Baird, History of the Huguenot Emigration to America, p 216

As the violence of persecution increased in France, other Huguenots sought refuge in the Antilles, Among these, in 1679, came Elie Neau…” left his home in Soubise, in Saintonge, at the age of 18. “He spent several years in the Dutch & French islands of the West Indies.”



Charles W. Baird, History of the Huguenot Emigration to America, p 213

"Shortly after the conformation to the Episcopal Church, [1710? or later?] a schism arose ... 'The seceders erected a meeting-house, styled themselves The French Protestant Congregation, and remained violently opposed to their lawful pastors; ...

Rev Pierre Stouppe ... writes: 'Dutch and Lutheran families generally unite with the church when the service is performed in English, & they bring their children to be baptized by the French Ministers.' New Rochelle, as well as Fordham, was considered within the spiritual jurisdiction of Westchester Village, then the only parish in the country. The French Church was named Trinity, and received, at the time, a charter from George the third, dated 1766."



The French Blood in America, L. J. Fosdick, Baltimore, 1973.

1737 New York Population of New York City and County was 10,664, the bulk o f the population still

lived below Wall Street.

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1738 New York Doctors visit ships in the Harbor to prevent epidemics of small-pox, etc.

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1735-45 Colonial America Great Awakenings - Itinerate preachers - religious reforms
1739 May 27 Huntington, LI Rebecka Brush baptized [no parents are listed]

Records Of The First Church In Huntington, ­Long Island,1723-1779. By The Rev. Ebenezer Prime. page 34

1739 Oct 28 Huntington, L.I. NY Margaret Brush, female baptized by E.P. [no parents are listed]

[Wife of Simon Losee; Mother of Abigail Losee]

Records of the First Church in Huntington, Long Island 1723-1779, p 34

New York "Margaret Brush is baptized; dau of Jonas b 1702 Huntington & Amy Pearsall of

Huntington. She was the sister of Ann Brush who married Tunis Van Cott"

Annie A Van Cott, The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott –America/Europe,

1739/40Jan. 13 Huntington, LI Eliphelet Brush is baptized [no parents are listed]

Records of the First Church in Huntington, Long Island 1723-1779, p 34

1740 abt of Oysterbay, Nassau, NY Simon Losee is born to Peter Losee & Abigeitje Lewislater married Margaret Brush

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1740 Oyster Bay, L.I. New York "Simon Losee, yeoman was overseer of the highways in Oyster Bay

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott -America / Europe,

Hand written note on the back of p 54

1740 Aug 3 Huntington, LI Temperance Brush is baptized [no parents are listed]

Records of the First Church in Huntington, Long Island 1723-1779, p 34

1740 Aug 10 Huntington, LI Rebacka Brush is baptized [no parents are listed]

Records of the First Church in Huntington, Long Island 1723-1779, p 35

1740 Sept 14 Huntington, LI Ezekiel Brush is baptized [no parents are listed]

Records of the First Church in Huntington, Long Island 1723-1779, p 34

1740/1 Mar 8 Huntington, LI Elizabeth Brush is baptized [no parents are listed]

Records of the First Church in Huntington, Long Island 1723-1779, p 35

1740/1 Mar 22 Huntington, LI Smith Brush is baptized [no parents are listed]

Records of the First Church in Huntington, Long Island 1723-1779, p 35

1741 May 31 Huntington, LI Nathaniel Brush is baptized [no parents are listed]

Records of the First Church in Huntington, Long Island 1723-1779, p 35

1741 Jun 21 Huntington, LI Joseph Brush is baptized [no parents are listed]

Records of the First Church in Huntington, Long Island 1723-1779, p 35

1742 Oyster Bay, L.I New York Simon Losee,”In June 1742, he sold his property in Oyster Bay to Rowmone Townson.

Sampson Crooker was Justice of the Peace for Queens County.”

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe,

Hand written note on the back of p 54

"Cornelius Losee [Simon Losee’s father] first native born is still alive this year.”

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe,

1743 New York Commodore George Clinton replaces Clark as Gov.

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1744 New York "The frequent recurrence of dangerous epidemics [small pox]" draw attention" to… the

unsanitary condition of the streets..." p 197

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1746 New York A colonial census is taken Population is 11,717

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

& History of Westchester Co, NY, From Early Settlement..., Shonnard & Spooner

1748 Apr Wheatly, L.I, .NY Simon Losee chosen at a town meeting to oversee highways for Wheatly L.I.

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe,

Hand written note on the back of p 54

1700 - 1749 pre-revolution New York Continuous fighting with the French (& Indian)

H. Swiggett, War out of Niagara

1749 American Colonies A colonial census is taken

History of Westchester Co, NY, From Early Settlement..., Shonnard & Spooner

1749 Wheatly, L.I, NY. Simon Losee chosen at a town meeting to oversee highways for Wheatly again

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe,

[I have parts copied.] Hand written note on the back of p 54

1753 New York Gov Clinton "secured his own recall" "His successor Danvers Osborn ... hanged

himself..."both events partly because of opposition of lieutenant-governor James DeLancey, who was then made governor. p 198

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1753 Oyster Bay, L.I, NY. Peter Losee and Abigelje Lewis, of Flatbush are married

PIETER LOSEE, son of Simon Losee and Margaret Koeck, married about 1753 Abigeltje

Lewis of Flatbush. He later moved to Dutchess Co. N.Y.

“Children born in Oyster Bay, last 3 not sure:

Grietje Bp 14 May 1754.

Phebe b abt 1756 md a Mr Queen.

Martha b abt 1758; d 19 Dec 1817 md Van Velser.

Simon b abt 1760 md Margaret Brush.

James ? b abt 1762 md 17 Mar 1784 Rachel Bedel of Hemp.

Margaret b abt 1766 md 8 Nov 1787 John Lawrence of Hemp.

Mary b abt 1764 md 20 Aug 1782 Epenetus Wood of Hemp

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe

1754-1763 American Colonies Fighting against the French and Indians resumes and continues "the last of the series

of struggles between French and English for dominance in America." The colonies made their first attempt to unite with a convention.

"New York ... was vitally interested in these campaigns." p 199

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1754 May 14 Oysterbay, Nassau, NY Grietje Losee is born to Peter Losee and Abigelje Lewis

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1755 New York Charles Hardy appointed and arrived as Gov. of N Y

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1756 abt of Oysterbay, Nassau, NY Phebe Losee is born to Peter Losee and Abigeltje Lewis

Later married Mr Queen

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1756 American Colonies A colonial census is taken.
Background of Family Relationships

"During Daniel's lifetime the family seems to have been kept well together, but after his death, perhaps influenced in some degree by the restlessness of the people just before the Revolution, his sons began to scatter. The Revolution introduced another disturbing element, sending two of his sons into exile. Only one of them remained near the old homestead, two went to Orange Co, and one (with two of Andrew's sons) to Albany Co. It was a period of comparative poverty, hard work, hard living, much ignorance, and large families. All of Daniel's sons, so far as I have records, had large families, the smallest 7 children, the largest 13. They were all typical pioneers, however, and they met the hardships of pioneer life bravely and cheerfully. When Daniel settled at Philipstown, he was in the backwoods, as I have said, for the Indians still lived in that vicinity, and hunting and trapping filled no small part of the settler's regular life. His sons were accustomed therefore to the rough fare and simple wants of the backwoodsmen, and their outlook upon life was unquestionably that of the frontiersman who have done so much to make the early history of our country."

"The Lamoureux Record", Oct 1919, AJ Lamoureux, in Yesteryears Magazine

1758 abt of Oysterbay, Nassau, NY Martha Losee is born to Peter Losee and Abigeltje Lewis

15 Feb1776 married William Van Velser; died 19 Dec 1817

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1759 Mar 5 Long Island, NY "Simon Losee, son of Peter Losee and Abigeltje Lewis, married Margaret Bush (Brush)

of Huntington," [Parents of Abigail Ann Losee]

SIMON LOSEE son of Pieter Losee and Abigeltje Lewis, married Margaret Bush of Huntington, 5 Mar. 1779. They moved first to Dutchess Co. N.Y. and later to New Brunswick, Canada where this son was born, may be other children:

X194.David b 10 Sept.1785;d.25 Sept.1844; md.abt.1813.”

They also had Abigail Ann Losee

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe

References: Records of the First Church of Huntington. p. 94.

Huntington Historical Society, Huntington, Long Island, New York, 1743

Huntington, LI Married, 5 March 1759 - Simon Losee, of Oysterbay, and Margaret Brush, of Huntington

Records Of The First Church In Huntington, ­Long Island,1723-1779. By The Rev. Ebenezer Prime.

Simon & Margaret Brush Losee have 8 children listed – Abigail Ann Losee, David Losee, Jonas Losee, Lewis Losee, Peter Losee, Amy Losee, Mary Losee, and Margaret Losee, all of Waterborough, Queens, N-Br.

Simon Losee and Margaret Bush are said to have moved from Long Island to Dutchess Co., NY soon after their marriage.” Note by Isabelle



Abigail married John McCord Lamoreaux, 30 May 1805, she died 1839.

David married Lydia Huff about 1813 – He died in Nauvoo, Ill. On 25 Sept 1844

Jonas married Zuba Peter married Caulerbury Hart

Cluff, Isabelle Lamoreaux Family Group Sheet for Simon Losee & Margaret Brush

THIS Is from the Huntington Church records

[NOTE: Our "Simon Losee, wife Margaret Bush; how could they have 4 children over 10? NOTE: The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott in America and Europe, by Annie A Van Cott, says they were married 5 Mar 1779!]
LOSEE, Simon: from Long Island. NY. He was a shoemaker by trade. He arrived in NB, May 1783, aboard the ship "Union", accom­panied by his wife, four children over the age of ten and one under ten. He settled in Queens Co. Two daughters were married at Gagetown. Queens Co, in 1805: Margaret m Norman Harvey and Abigail m John Lammereux.”

Sharon Dubeau, New Brunswick Loyalist

1759 Dec 11 Huntington, LI Rebecca Brush and Gilbert Carll are married

Records Of The First Church In Huntington, ­Long Island,1723-1779. By The Rev. Ebenezer Prime.

1760 Oyster Bay, L.I, NY. Simon Losee is born to Peter Losee and Margaret Koeck

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe,

1760 Apr 23 Westchester Co NY , Muster roll lists "Joshua Lumerix"; 5'8"; "Black hair & black eyes"

"Men raised and passed in the Co of Westchester for Captain Jon'th Haight Company, May ye 13, 1760." [Isabelle says he fought with Brit 18 Mo. WHERE is this reference?]

Westchester, NY "Joshua Lumerix" "Enlisted 23 Apr - age 21, born in Westchester Co, cordwainer,

Volunteer in Capt. Phil. Verplanck's Co." Enlisted by Capt. Haight

[Isabelle says he fought with Brit 18 Mo. WHERE is this reference?]

Muster Roll, 13 May 1760 Capt. Haight Co State of NY, Report of the State Historian 1897,Colonial series v Mesa FHC US, NY, H2, 3
NOTE: [1760 was pre-Revolutionary War. They were probably mustered for fighting the French & Indian War]

[Were Losee & etc on any Muster Rolls? akrc]
1760 May 13 Wheatly, LI, NY Simon Losee writes a will

I, Simon Losee, of Wheatly in the Township of Oysterbay in Queen Co. on Nassau Island in Province of New York, 13 May 1760, very far advanced in years and is old knowing in a short time I must yield unto death, but my understanding sound and memory as good as can be expected, considering my age, I am willing to set my house in order before my final charge doth come and to dispose of my outward estate wherewith it has pleased allmighty God to bless me with in this life. I do will and doyle the same in the following manner.



I will and bequeath unto my well beloved wife Margaret Losee, one of the best featherbeds which I have in my house with full furniture thereunto belonging….”

Will was proved 18 Oct 1863.

Historical Documents Section of Queens College,

See Also The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe

1700 - 1749 pre-revolution New York Continuous fighting with the French (& Indian)

H. Swiggett, War out of Niagara

1754-1763, American Colonies “…the Fighting against the French and Indians resumes and continues "the last of the

series of struggles between French and English for dominance in America." "New York ... was vitally interested in these campaigns." p 199

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1762 abt of Oysterbay, Nassau, NY James Losee is born to Peter Losee and Abigeltje Lewis

17 Mar 1784 married Rachel Bedal of Huntington,17 Mar 1784

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1763 The treaty of Paris was signed, ending the conflict between English & French, giving the

English control of North America east of the Mississippi. p 199

The Iconography of Manhattan Island 1498 * 1909, Stokes

1763 New York "The 22,000 people of NYC were crammed into the area that the financial district now

occupies, with the rest of Manhattan, and all of Queens, Kings, Staten Island, and northern NJ lying almost empty.

The American Revolution, Edward Countryman

1763 Oct 15 of Oyster Bay, Nassau., NY Simon Losee son of Cornelius Losee & Geertje Denton

married to Margaret Koeck – his will proved 15 Oct 1763.

Family Group Sheet: Simon & Margaret Koeck Losee by Isabelle Lamoreaux Cluff

1763 Oct 18 Wheatley, NY Simon Losee's will written 13 May 1760, is proved "I, Simon Losee of Wheatley in the

town of Oyster Bay, Queens Co., being very far advanced in years and well knowing that in a short time I must yield unto death, but my understanding and memory is good as can be expected, and am willing to set my house in order. I leave to my wife, Margaret (Koeck?) one of my best feather-beds that I have in the house, with full furniture. My executors may sell all lands, meadows, and houses and rights of land and all personal estate. I leave to my daughter, Martha, a bed and furniture and also a cow. My executors are to put 25 lbs. at interest for my wife for her support and if the interest is not sufficient, my executors are to pay more. After her death or marriage the principal to be paid to my sons, Laurens and Pieter, and my grandsons, James and Simon, sons of my son Simon, deceased. To my daughter Martha, 25 lbs. After paying debts and funeral charges of all the rest of my estate, I leave to my sons Laurence and Pieter 1/13 (out of this is to be taken 59 lbs. 5 s, 6d, which I have paid to Lewis Hewlett, as being bondsman for my son-in-law, John Huff, and the remainder to the children of my said daughter , Sarah Huff, viz., Pieter, Sarah and Martha, and her grandchild, Martha Sammis). To the children of my son, Simon deceased, James, Simon, Ann and Sarah, 1/13. To my daughter, Margaret Crooker, 1/13. To my daughter, Hannah Albertus, 1/13. To my daughter, Mary Walters, 1/13. To my daughter Elizabeth Ireland 1/13. To my daughter Ann Totten, 1/13. To my daughters Charity Titus and Phebe Weeks, each 1/13. My wife "

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe

Her sources: Doc Hist of the Dutch Congregation of Oyster Bay by Stoutenburgh, pp 289, 290. NY 012A

Adventures for God by Haight, p165 – Records of Huntington, p94

N.Y. record 12 pages 79, 81, 142 & 66 f 363.

1763 Nov 2-3 Wheatley, NY “Indenture made 3 Nov 1763 between Laurence Losee of the Manor of Cortland in

Westchester Co.; Peter Losee of Hempstead, in Queens Co., and Joseph Ireland of Huntington, Suffolk Co., and James Losee of Oyster Bay, Queens Co., executor of the will of Simon Losee, lately deceased of Wheatley in Oyster Bay of the one part and Isaac Rushmore Oyster Bay of the other part, witness that Simon Losee in his last will did empower them to sell and dispose of his lands, appeared May 13, 1760. Will executed 2 Nov 1772.

From Oyster Bay Town Records vols 5 & 6 – quoted in

Annie A Van Cott The Female Ancestors of Losee Van Cott - America /Europe,

1764 abt of Oysterbay, Nassau, NY Mary Losee is born to Peter Losee and Abigeltje Lewis

20 Aug 1782 married Epenetus Wood 20 Aug 1782

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1763-65 New York Marriages in State of New York – lists Losee Marriages – none mine.

Provost, ?? .Secretary of the Province of N.Y. page 237

1765 American Colonies Stamp Act; "...emigration,(to Canada) beginning as early as the Stamp Act crisis in

1765, took place throughout the revolutionary period and even beyond."

Victorious in Defeat, Wallace Brown, 1984, p 30

1765-1775 Philipse Josue' Lamoureux is on the tax rolls

[Were Losee & etc there?Loyalist Petitions give information on the Lamoreaux family. Are there similar petitions written by the Losee family?]
1766 abt of Oysterbay, Nassau, NY Margaret Losee is born to Peter Losee and Abigeltje Lewis

8 Nov 1787 married John Lawrence- 8 Nov 1787

Family Group Sheet by Sarah Christina Merrell

1770's Duchess Co, NY Josue' Lamoraux "Resided at Duchess Co, NY... was obliged to leave his property to the

value of two hundred pounds N York currency in land and movable estate ... Beside services as a vollintear at the outpost with Col Dellincar (Delancy) was taken prisoner and wounded and very badly treated while with them But got exchanged and remained till the treaty of peace"

[I think this means he & family remained in New York City, Morrisania, Long Island or etc.]

Loyalist Petition #271 & 273 & cover 20 Mar 1786

Fredricton, NB, Dept of Nat'l Resources,

1770's Peeks Kill, NY Josue' nephew Daniel's petition says "...formerly of Peekskill, West Chester, New York

...his aged father & numerous family were all faithful to his majesty ... were exceedingly persecuted and all driven from a very valuable and pleasant farm ... served 18 months with Cole. James

Morisania, NY De Lancy at Morisania [Daniel says he built a house at Morisania] --- a very Hazard and

important Post where there was attacks and continual apprehension from an enraged and cruel Enemy ---where he rec. no pay except rations, nor did he choose to live or enrich him self by Plunder" "That for his loyalty, he has in the vigor of his youth, lost his native Country -- the Hopes of a pretty Patrimony, his tender Parents and affectionate Friends ..."

Loyalist Petition #148 by Daniel Lamoureux, 30 Mar 1786

Fredricton, New Brunswick Dept of Nat'l Resources,

Josue' said they lived "in the worst part of New York ... very close and cannons fired over their land."

Petition #

NOTE: [Remained? Where? NYC? Are there records of prisoner exchanges? Some are listed in 1777, not Josue']

1770's New York Joshua, ... having been forced to flee from his native state, New York, where he, with

others loyal to old King George of England, had been branded as Tories in their refusal to fight with American patriots in the Revolutionary War."

Edith Ivans Lamoreaux "The Life Story of David Burlock Lamoreaux",

1771, American Colonies A colonial census is taken; this is the last of the colonial census

History of Westchester Co, NY, From Early Settlement..., Shonnard & Spooner

1775 American Colonies According to Memorials written later, by John McCord Lamoreaux, Joshua "joined the

British Standard" in 1775. Family tradition states they were in the worst area of fighting. War started 1775 even before Declaration.

See later petitions

"Perhaps the hardest condition for both sides to bear during the years of the long fight in the (Hudson) valley was the bitter dissension among neighbors."

[Daniel's sons are listed on both sides of the fighting.]

The Lordly Hudson, Carl Cramer

New York in the Revolution As Colony and State, Second Edition. James A. Roberts. 1898 lists the following Losee men in the general index: [no Lamoreaux listed]

John Lose, 153; Abraham Losee 137; Abraham L Losee, 137,246; George Losee, 246; Jacob Losee, 137; James Losee, 249; John Losee, 137; John A Losee, 137, 147; Simeon Losee, 137; Simon Losee, 249; Channy Lossee, 246.

IN the index for the Militia (Land Bounty Rights) – Dutchess County, Sixth Regiment:

James Losee, and Simon Losee

IN the index for the Militia (Land Bounty Rights) – Dutchess County, Second Regiment:

Abraham Losee, Abraham L Losee, Jacob Losee, John Losee, John A Losee, Simeon Losee

Also in this list are listed Benjamin Ogden and Joseph Ogden page 411,249,& 137.

Roberts, James A. New York in the Revolution As Colony and State, Second Edition.

1776 July 4 American Colonies Declaration of Independence is signed

NOTE: The Loyalist families were forced to evacuate their Hudson River farms and go into New York City by 1779 through 1783. Housing was crowded and inadequate. Parts of the City had been burned. Food was rationed out by the British.]
1776 American Colonies "Many of the younger generation joined the army as patriots, ... some, Joshua being

among them, had fled northward into Canada to escape imprisonment or even death.

Edith Ivans Lamoreaux, "The Life History of David B Lamoreaux

[This is unclear. Josué Lamoreaux and Simon Losee did leave and go into Canada but not till after the end of the war. Josué was wounded, captured and traded. He and his family probably were in NYC from ?__? till the end of the war. Although they are not on any Vitualling list in NY City, they left NY City on a British Summer Fleet to go into Canada.]



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