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Lesson Plans and Classroom Activities



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Lesson Plans and Classroom Activities for the

Elementary Classroom





  • Compare and Contrast the Lives of Toussaint L’Ouverture and George Washington – Primary and Intermediate



  • A Child’s Life – Here and in Haiti – Primary and Intermediate



  • Haitian Heritage and Culture – Primary and Intermediate



  • The Haitian Earthquake of 2010 – The Story of Mitchialine – Primary and Intermediate



Haitian Heritage Month Elementary Lesson Plan


GRADE LEVEL: Social Studies – Elementary – Primary and Intermediate
TITLE: Biography of Toussaint L’Ouverture
OBJECTIVES: Objectives from the Florida Standards are noted with FS.


  1. The students will describe the contributions of Toussaint L’Ouverture to Haitian independence and history.

  2. The students will determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. (FS)

  3. The students will ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. (FS)

SUGGESTED TIME: 60 minutes
DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES:
TEACHER’S NOTE: Separate primary and intermediate reading assignments and questions are provided for this lesson. Teachers may use the reading most appropriate for their students. Primary teachers may choose to read the biography aloud to students.


  1. Show students an image of Toussaint L’Ouverture (provided) and ask them if they know who he was and why he was important to the history of Haiti. Explain that he led the Haitian Revolution over 200 years ago. He helped end slavery in Haiti and also helped Haiti become a free and independent country from France. He is considered a patriot and national hero in Haiti even though he died many years ago.

Explain the American Revolution was also fought in our country over 200 years ago to help secure our freedom from Great Britain. Ask students to name patriots from the American Revolution that helped our nation become free and independent. Explain that we call these men “patriots” for their efforts to help secure our freedom and rights. (Answers on American patriots will vary depending on the age of students, but George Washington is a likely response. Other patriots may include Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, John and Samuel Adams, and Benjamin Franklin.)


Show students several images of patriots from the American Revolution. (An image of George Washington may be found in the lesson that follows. Other images are easily found by searching for “images of American Revolution patriots” on the Internet.)


  1. Explain that students will now read about "Toussaint L’Ouverture and the Haitian Revolution.

Have students read the “Biography of Toussaint L’Ouverture” assignment (provided) and answer the questions about the reading (provided). The questions may be answered in writing or orally.


TEACHER’S NOTES:
Primary - You may choose to read the biography aloud to primary students.
Intermediate – Prior to the reading, discuss the difference between a biography (A story about a person’s life written by another person.) and an autobiography (A story about a person’s life written by that person.).


  1. Discuss the answers to the reading questions focusing on Toussaint L’Ouverture’s role as a leader of Haiti’s efforts to become a free nation.




  1. Review the students’ earlier responses regarding American patriots from the past. Explain that in the next lesson, students will compare and contrast the lives of two patriots - Toussaint L’Ouverture of Haiti and George Washington.


ASSESSMENT STRATEGY: Completion of the reading assignment and questions.
MATERIALS/AIDS NEEDED: Image of Toussaint L’Ouverture (provided); “Biography of Toussaint L’Ouverture” (provided); “Questions” (provided)
SOURCES: Reading adapted from:


  1. World Book (Advanced), http://www.worldbookonline.com/advanced/article?id=ar562640&st=haiti

  2. History Wiz, http://www.historywiz.com/toussaint.htm


Image of Toussaint L’Ouverture
http://www.umsoi.com/francais/wp-content/uploads/toussaint_louverture.jpg

Source:http://www.umsoi.com/francais/wp-content/uploads/toussaint_louverture.jpg


Biography of Toussaint L’Ouverture (Primary Reading)
Many years ago, Toussaint L’Ouverture (1743-1803) was the leader of the Haitian Revolution. He helped end slavery in Haiti. He also helped Haiti win its freedom from France.
Toussaint was born a slave on the Caribbean island of Saint Dominique. Saint Dominique is known as Haiti today. Toussaint was an intelligent boy. Even though he was a slave, he learned how to read and write. Toussaint loved to read books. Toussaint also learned to speak French, Creole, and some Latin.
When Toussaint was around 33 years old, he became a free man. Slaves in Saint Dominique also wanted to be free. They fought their slave owners with Toussaint as their leader. Toussaint was an excellent general. He led an army of slaves against the French and they won. Toussaint became the leader of Saint Dominique. Toussaint was a hero.
Napoleon was the leader of France. He wanted to take back control of Saint Dominique. Napoleon sent a large army to Saint Dominique. Toussaint and others once again fought for their freedom against the French. Toussaint was captured. He was placed in a prison in France, where he died on April 7, 1803.
Jean Jacques Dessalines followed Toussaint as leader of the Haitian Revolution. He declared Saint-Domingue the independent country of Haiti in 1804.

Sources: Adapted from:




  1. World Book (Advanced), http://www.worldbookonline.com/advanced/article?id=ar562640&st=haiti

  2. History Wiz, http://www.historywiz.com/toussaint.htm

Toussaint L’Ouverture (Intermediate Reading)
Toussaint L’Ouverture (1743-1803) was the leader of the Haitian Revolution. He helped end slavery in Haiti. He also helped Haiti win its freedom from France.
Toussaint was born a slave in the French colony of Saint Dominique. Saint Dominique is known as Haiti today. Toussaint’s slave owner knew that he was an intelligent boy. He encouraged Toussaint to learn how to read and write. Toussaint loved to read the books in his owner’s library. His reading taught him that equality and freedom are important for all people. Toussaint also learned to speak French, Creole, and some Latin. When Toussaint was around 33 years old, he became a free man.
In 1791, slaves revolted in Saint Dominique. They wanted their freedom. Toussaint became one of their leaders. He led an army of slaves against the French and they won. Slavery ended in the colony in 1793 and the blacks in Haiti were free. But, more work needed to be done. Toussaint next helped France defeat the British and Spanish that had invaded Saint Dominque. By April 1796, Toussaint was the leader of Saint Dominique. Toussaint was a hero.
Saint Dominque did well with Toussaint as its leader. However, Napoleon I, the leader of France, wanted to take back control of the colony. In 1802, Napoleon sent a large army to bring slavery back to Saint Dominique. Toussaint and others once again fought to free the colony from the French. Later that year, Toussaint was captured. He was placed in a prison in France, where he died on April 7, 1803.
Jean Jacques Dessalines followed Toussaint as leader of the Haitian revolution. He declared Saint-Domingue the independent country of Haiti in 1804.

Sources: Adapted from:

:


  1. World Book (Advanced), http://www.worldbookonline.com/advanced/article?id=ar562640&st=haiti

  2. History Wiz, http://www.historywiz.com/toussaint.htm


Questions – Biography of Toussaint L’Ouverture (Primary)
Name: ________________________________________________________


  1. What did Toussaint fight to end in Haiti?


  1. When Toussaint was a boy, what did he learn to do even though he was a slave?


  1. Who did Toussaint help lead in the fight against France? Did they win the fight?


  1. Who was the leader of France? What did he do to Toussaint?


  1. Why do you think Toussaint is called a hero in Haiti?

Questions – Biography of Toussaint L’Ouverture (Intermediate)
Name: ___________________________________________________________



  1. As the leader of the Haitian Revolution, what two things did Toussaint help accomplish for Haiti?


  1. When Toussaint was a boy, what did he learn to do even though he was a slave?


  1. Describe the events that happened in Saint Dominique (Haiti) between 1791 and 1796:


  1. Who was the leader of France during the Haitian Revolution? What did he decide to do in Haiti?


  1. Who followed Toussaint as the leader of the Haitian Revolution? What did he declare in 1804?


  1. Why do you think Toussaint is considered a hero even today in Haiti?


Haitian Heritage Month Elementary Lesson Plan


GRADE LEVEL: Social Studies – Elementary - Primary and Intermediate
TITLE: Compare and Contrast the Lives of Toussaint L’Ouverture and

George Washington


OBJECTIVES: Objectives from the Florida Standards are noted with FS.


  1. The students will compare and contrast the lives and achievements of the revolutionary patriots Toussaint L’Ouverture and George Washington.

  2. The students will describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. (FS)


SUGGESTED TIME: 60 minutes
DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES:
TEACHER’S NOTES: This lesson provides the opportunity to compare and contrast the lives and achievements of two revolutionary patriots. Separate readings are provided for primary and intermediate students.


  1. Primary Teachers: Consider utilizing this lesson if it is appropriate for the ability and maturity of the students. You may opt to substitute the reading on George Washington (provided) with the short video biography on YouTube, if available. The video is found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSeAGXmk3IA



  1. Intermediate Teachers: You may substitute the reading on George Washington with any other short biography on Washington you prefer. Sources for biographies on Washington include:




  • ABC Teach, http://www.abcteach.com/free/r/rc_washington_upperlem.pdf

  • Ducksters.com,

http://www.ducksters.com/biography/uspresidents/georgewashington.php

  • Enchanted Learning, http://www.enchantedlearning.com/history/us/pres/washington/

  • Mr. Nussbaum, http://mrnussbaum.com/presidents/georgewashington/




  1. Discuss the concepts of comparing (finding similarities) and contrasting (finding differences). To illustrate the concepts, have students compare and contrast basketball and soccer as a whole group activity. Record responses using the Venn diagram graphic organizer (included).

  2. Explain that students will be using the same Venn diagram graphic organizer to compare/contrast the lives of two important heroes/patriots from the past – Toussaint L’Ouverture, leader of the Haitian Revolution, and George Washington, the first President of the United States.

Show students the image of Toussaint L’Ouverture (provided with the previous lesson) and the image of George Washington (provided). Note that both of these men lived at approximately the same time in history and both helped lead their nation to freedom.

  1. Using the “Biography of Toussaint L’Ouverture” (included with the previous lesson) and the “Biography of George Washington” (provided), have students work in pairs to develop the Venn diagram.

TEACHER’S NOTE: Primary teachers may opt to complete the Venn diagram activity as a whole group activity.

  1. Following the activity, debrief by having students share the results of their work. Develop a master Venn diagram on the board for students to see. Correct student inaccuracies during the discussion.

ASSESSMENT STRATEGY: Completion of the Venn diagram compare/contrast activity.
MATERIALS/AIDS NEEDED:Biography of Toussaint L’Ouverture” (provided in previous lesson); image of Toussaint L’Ouverture (provided in previous lesson); image of George Washington (provided); “Biography of George Washington” (provided); blank Venn diagram (provided).

Image of George Washington http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f4/rembrandt_peale_-_george_washington_(porthole_type)_-_google_art_project.jpg
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f4/Rembrandt_Peale_-_George_Washington_(Porthole_type)_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

Biography of George Washington (Primary)
George Washington was the first President of the United States. He was also a famous general. He helped the United States become a new nation.
Early Life
George Washington was born in Virginia, on February 22, 1732. Virginia was a British colony.
His father died when George was just 11 years old. George’s older half-brother named Lawrence helped raise him. George learned subjects like reading and mathematics. 
When George was 16 years old, he went to work as a surveyor. He measured new lands.
Washington Becomes a Soldier and Hero
As a young man, George became an officer with the volunteer army in Virginia. George later became a hero in the French and Indian War when he helped the British defeat the French.
Later, George married Martha Dandridge Custis. George became a large land owner and was elected to the Virginia legislature. 
The American Revolution
Soon George and other landowners became upset with unfair taxes and treatment by their British rulers. They began to argue and fight for their rights. When the British would not agree to be fair, the colonists went to war. George Washington was the general that led the colonists. The war was called the American Revolution.
General Washington had a hard job. He had an army of colonial farmers to fight trained British soldiers. He led his army to victory over the British. The United States became a new and free nation.
President Washington 
George Washington was the nation’s first president. He helped the new nation form a government from the words of the Constitution. Washington was president for eight years. He felt it was important that the president not become powerful, like a king.
Just a few years after leaving the office of president, Washington caught a bad cold. He was very sick with a throat infection and died on December 14, 1799. 

Sources: Reading adapted from:




  1. ABC Teach, http://www.abcteach.com/free/r/rc_washington_upperlem.pdf

  2. Ducksters.com, http://www.ducksters.com/biography/uspresidents/georgewashington.php


Biography of George Washington (Intermediate)
George Washington was the first President of the United States. George Washington is also known for leading the Continental Army in victory over the British in the American Revolution.
Growing Up - George Washington was born in Pope’s Creek, Virginia, on February 22, 1732. His father, a landowner and planter, died when Washington was just 11 years old. Fortunately, Washington’s older half-brother named Lawrence helped to raise him and made sure that he was educated in the basic subjects like reading and mathematics. 
When Washington turned 16, he went to work as a surveyor, where he took the measurements of new lands. A few years later, Washington became an officer with the Virginia militia (volunteer army) and became involved in the start of the French and Indian War. In 1754, Washington fought against three hundred French soldiers at Fort Duquesne near what is now the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. By this time he had been promoted to colonel. At one point during the war, he narrowly escaped death when his horse was shot out from under him. 
Before the American Revolution  - After the French and Indian War, Washington settled down and married the widow Martha Dandridge Custis. He took over the estate of Mount Vernon and raised Martha's two children from her former marriage. George and Martha never had children of their own. George became a large land owner and was elected to the Virginia legislature. 
Soon George and his fellow landowners became upset with unfair taxes and treatment by their British rulers. They began to argue and fight for their rights. When the British refused, the American Revolution began in 1775. This war led to the creation of the United States of America.
The American Revolution and Leading the American Continental Army – Washington was one of Virginia's representatives at the First and Second Continental Congress. This was a group of representatives from each colony who decided to fight the British together. In May of 1775, they appointed George Washington as general of the American Continental Army. 
General Washington did not have an easy task. He had an army of colonial farmers to fight trained British soldiers. However, he managed to hold the army together even during tough times and losing battles. Over the course of six years, General Washington led the army to victory over the British. The British Army surrendered in Yorktown, Virginia on October 17, 1781. The United States was a new nation.
Washington's Presidency - George Washington served as president for two terms or eight years. During this time, President Washington established many roles and traditions of the President of the United States that still stand today. He helped build and guide the formation of the actual U.S. government from the words of the Constitution. He formed the first presidential cabinet which included Thomas Jefferson (Secretary of State) and Alexander Hamilton (Secretary of the Treasury). 
Washington stepped down from the presidency after 8 years, or two terms. He felt it was important that the president not become powerful or rule too long, like a king.
Just a few years after leaving the office of president, Washington caught a bad cold. He was soon very sick with a throat infection and died on December 14, 1799. 

Sources: Reading adapted from:



  1. ABC Teach, http://www.abcteach.com/free/r/rc_washington_upperlem.pdf

  2. Ducksters.com, http://www.ducksters.com/biography/uspresidents/georgewashington.php

Venn Diagram


http://www.clipartbest.com/cliparts/aiq/zex/aiqzexrqt.gif

Haitian Heritage Month

Elementary Lesson Plan

GRADE LEVEL: Social Studies – Elementary – Primary and Intermediate
TITLE: A Child’s Life – Here and in Haiti
OBJECTIVES: Objectives from the Florida Standards are noted with FS.


  1. The students will compare and contrast the daily life of children in the local community to the daily life of children in Haiti.



  1. The students will describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. (FS)



  1. The students will use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur). (FS)


SUGGESTED TIME: 60 minutes
DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES:
TEACHER’S NOTE: This lesson provides the opportunity for students to examine everyday life in Haiti from a child’s perspective. As the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, many of the photos provide a stark contrast to the lives lived by many children in our community. As the lesson progresses, introduce the hardships faced by Haiti over the years, as appropriate (e.g., poverty, political issues, natural disasters such as hurricanes and the 2010 earthquake). Work with students to understand that “different” does not mean “better” or “worse” when studying people who live in a different culture.


  1. Ask students to think about how they live and the activities they participate in every day. List some of these activities on the board (e.g., life at home, school, play, watching TV, working on the computer, sports, weekend fun with friends and family.)



  1. To begin to compare/contrast children’s lives in Haiti with children’s lives in the U.S. and to engage students in the lesson, show students the first few pictures of Haitian children in the packet of images entitled, “A Child’s Life in Haiti” (provided).

Briefly discuss the students’ first impressions of the pictures of Haiti. Explain that they will be comparing how children live in Haiti to how children live in our community.

  1. Assign students to work with a partner to examine all of the images in the packet entitled, “A Child’s Life in Haiti” (provided). While working in pairs, have students draw and complete the following chart:



My Life

Life in Haiti

Food: example: We eat pizza, sandwiches and drink juice.

They might eat rice and beans.

Clothes:





Houses:





School:





Family Activities:





Fun Activities:





Other:




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