Work in the eu: women and men at opposite ends



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25% 31%
2004
STEM, tertiary education
22%
30%
46%
50%
STEM, vocational education
8%
10%
36%
41%
EHW, tertiary education
57%
54%
56%
57%
EHW, vocational education
27%
49%
35%
52%
2014
Women
Men
Note: There are no data for Malta due to lack of comparable occupation data.
Sources: EU-LFS, calculations based on 2013-2014 microdata.
STEM = Science, technology, engineering and mathematics
EHW = Education, health and welfare
Figure 2.

Share of women and men with jobs matching their study field
© ian johnst on/Shutt erst ock
.c om


Why is this happening?
Gender stereotypes - the biggest culprit
Throughout our lives we often face social pressure from parents, peers or teachers to conform to traditional gender expectations that influence subject and career choices. Gender stereotypes discourage people from choosing and staying in professions that are atypical for their gender. For example, prejudices about men’s ability and suitability to work in education or personal care are largely responsible for occupational gender segregation.

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