World Blind Union Office 1929 Bayview Avenue Toronto, on m4G 3E



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Toronto, ON M4G 3E



Telephone: 1-416-486-9698

Fax: 1-416-486-8107

E-mail: info@wbuoffice.org


WBU User Requirements for Television Receiving Equipment


2011
[Volume 1]

World Blind Union

Acknowledgements

This WBU User Requirements for Television Receiving Equipment document has been written and developed by:


Larry Goldberg- National Center for Accessible Media, WGBH

Mark Magennis - National Council for the Blind of Ireland

Raheel Mallick - Royal National Institute of Blind People

Dipendra Manocha - Saksham Trust

Chris Mikul - Media Access Australia

Richard Orme - Royal National Institute of Blind People [Chair]

Sonali Rai - Royal National Institute of Blind People

Paul Schroeder - American Foundation for the Blind

Mike Townsend - European Blind Union

ONCE 
Sincere thanks to Heather Cryer (RNIB) and Joan Greening (RNIB) for reviewing, proof-reading and commenting on the content of this draft.


If you want to contact WBU’s office staff, please use the following email address: info@wbuoffice.org

For further information about this document please contact:

Sonali Rai

Media and Culture Development Officer

Royal National Institute of Blind People

105 Judd Street

London

WC1H 9NE


Phone: 020 7391 3270

Email: sonali.rai@rnib.org.uk


Table of Contents


World Blind Union Office 1929 Bayview Avenue 1

Toronto, ON M4G 3E 1



Telephone: 1-416-486-9698 1

E-mail: info@wbuoffice.org 1

WBU User Requirements for Television Receiving Equipment 1

Acknowledgements 2

Table of Contents 3

Introduction 6

1. Scope 6

2. Terms and definitions 11

3. Background - accessible television 14

4. Access to television - user requirements 22

References 34

Website: http://www.allformp3.com/dvd-faqs/145.htm; Accessed on September 30 2010 36

Appendix 1: User profiles 37

Appendix 2: Current level of delivery of audio description in different countries and relevant legislations 42

"Public broadcasters in only five Member States provided any of their programmes with audio description (for visually impaired people) in 2006 and, where they did, the levels provided amounted to a very small percentage of their overall programming; only in one country [UK] did any commercial broadcaster provide any AD.” 44

Appendix 3: Existing consumer equipment standards and guidelines 45

Appendix 4: RNIB Clear Print Guidelines 47

Appendix 5: Standards and guidelines for remote controls 51

[In the order of appearance] 51

Appendix 6: Current audio description standards 53

World Blind Union Office 1929 Bayview Avenue 1

Toronto, ON M4G 3E 1



Telephone: 1-416-486-9698 1

E-mail: info@wbuoffice.org 1

WBU User Requirements for Television Receiving Equipment 1

Acknowledgements 2

Table of Contents 3

Introduction 7

1. Scope 7

2. Terms and definitions 12

3. Background - accessible television 15

4. Access to television - user requirements 23

References 35

Website: http://www.allformp3.com/dvd-faqs/145.htm; Accessed on September 30 2010 37

Appendix 1: User profiles 38

Appendix 2: Current level of delivery of audio description in different countries and relevant legislations 43

"Public broadcasters in only five Member States provided any of their programmes with audio description (for visually impaired people) in 2006 and, where they did, the levels provided amounted to a very small percentage of their overall programming; only in one country [UK] did any commercial broadcaster provide any AD.” 45

Appendix 3: Existing consumer equipment standards and guidelines 46

Appendix 4: RNIB Clear Print Guidelines 48

Appendix 5: Standards and guidelines for remote controls 52

[In the order of appearance] 52

Appendix 6: Current audio description standards 54



Foreword


"How can a blind person watch television?" is a question I am often asked. This question illustrates the lack of knowledge and appreciation surrounding the needs of blind and partially sighted people.
Blind and partially sighted do watch television, in fact most of us have some perception of light therefore can see shadows or shapes, not to mention the audible experience. Television just like radio becomes a central source of information as well as helping to ensure the very important and personal sense of social inclusion.
It is often assumed that television is a visual medium and therefore out of reach of people with no sight. But even for people who are totally blind, television offers a rich experience and one that is shared with family and friends.
It can be said with a degree of certainty that the past few years have changed the way we watch television. That is apparent not only in the medium's increasingly interactive nature, but also in the numerous formats available or being introduced, such as high-definition [HD] or 3D. Apart from being astounding, the advances made in this audio-visual technology have brought it closer to our lives, catering to our appetite for information, entertainment, shopping, education and training. However, despite the progress, access to television for people with visual disabilities is still a cause for concern. If not solved in the near future, this problem could potentially lead to unacceptable social exclusion of this segment from an audio-visual medium that is likely to be the focal point of all future household communication. "Design for all" or "universal design" is the desirable starting point, and it translates into manufacturing television equipment that can be used by all citizens.
Maryanne Diamond

President


World Blind Union


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