25th Anniversary 25 years of improving worker protection through the Development of Standards Committee F23 on Protective Clothing



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25th Anniversary



25 YEARS OF IMPROVING WORKER PROTECTION

Through the Development of Standards




Committee F23 on

Protective Clothing

25th Anniversary of

ASTM F23 Committee on Protective Clothing
Anniversaries are a time for celebration, remembering the past, looking at where we are today and considering the future. Committee F23 on Protective Clothing has a long, successful record of developing voluntary consensus standards, practices, guides and specifications for protective clothing. These standards serve to improve the well-being of workers across a broad range of occupations.
We began in the mid-1970’s, stimulated in part by the passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. Preventing worker contact with chemical carcinogens was the initial concern. In 1977 a group of users and producers of protective clothing met in Valley Forge to discuss the creation of a new technical committee on protective clothing. The group established scope and mission statements and formed ASTM Committee F23 on Chemical Protective Clothing.
The first actual committee meeting was held 18-19 January 1978 at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia. The early activities of the committee focused on leadership and technical committee structure. Standard chemical and physical test methods for protective clothing were needed. Hence, chemical and physical sub-committees were established as well as a planning committee. Early chairmen were Jerry Hess and Gerard Coletta. In 1983 the first test method was adopted, ASTM F739 on chemical permeation resistance. A molten metal test method for heat transfer, ASTM F955 was adopted in 1985. Now there are close to 40 standards for protective clothing, ranging from chemical, physical, biological to chain saw and fire protection.
Membership on the committee has grown from about 50 to over than 220 persons. The initial nucleus of people set a course that changed the protective clothing industry and how the world approached the use of clothing for worker protection. Governmental agencies such as NIOSH, OSHA, EPA, NASA, CDC, the Army, the Coast Guard, FEMA and the FDA were active participants. The Committee became “the” forum for technical discussions of protective clothing performance and evaluation. The Committee initiated an international symposium series that continues today. We became participants in ISO (International Standard Organization) long before globalization was recognized as critical to commerce.
Important results of our standards are new protective clothing products developed to be more resistant to chemical, physical and biological hazards and to offer comfort and less ergonomic stress. These standards have direct applicability to the growing concern for protection from agents and weapons of mass destruction and bio-terrorism. September 11th and its aftermath clearly made evident the importance of our contributions as society saw military personnel, fire fighters and emergency responders wearing some of the latest protective clothing products.
In all, our committee has contributed much to improve the safety and health of workers over the past 25 years. While technology, industry and the workforce will change in the future, there will always be a need for protective clothing. ASTM Committee F23 will continue to play a key role in minimizing contact with hazards and improving the safety and well-being of workers and the general population. From mines to hospitals to waste sites to agricultural to space missions, protective clothing enables human accomplishment. Committee F23 has a proud history and an important future.


HIGHLIGHTS IN THE HISTORY OF COMMITTEE F23
Committee F23 has focused its attention on clothing that is used to protect against occupational hazards. These hazards may be physical, chemical, biological, or thermal in nature. The committee was organized in 1977 by individuals representing both producers and users of chemical protective clothing. They were motivated by occupational health concerns, because it was becoming increasingly apparent that protective clothing was not an impermeable barrier to all hazards in the workplace. With emphasis being placed on reducing and controlling occupational, chemical contacts, standard methods for evaluating the performance of protective clothing were needed. The first task of Committee F23 was to develop voluntary standard test methods for evaluating performance of chemical protective clothing.
The committee worked for several years on a series of chemical resistance test methods, encompassing the degradation, penetration, and permeation resistance of materials to chemicals. Resistance to the thermal properties of molten metals became the next area where performance standards were developed for protective clothing. After numerous interlaboratory tests and balloting processes three standard methods evolved from Committee F23. These included Test Method F739, for measuring permeation resistance, Test Method F903, for measuring penetration resistance, and Test Method F955 for measuring thermal resistance of protective clothing to molten metals.
By this time the committee was gaining recognition and additional members were becoming involved in its activities. Regulatory agencies and government groups, such as the Environmental Protection Agency, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and U. S. Coast Guard, were sending representatives to meetings. At this time, it became evident that the committee should expand to address concerns in several areas related not only to chemical and molten metal protection but other areas where the need for protective clothing existed.
After the first test methods were developed, the Chemical Subcommittee worked to provide tools to further promote the use of these test methods. Guide F1001 established a battery of chemicals for chemical resistance testing and has become the industry benchmark for claiming material barrier performance against chemicals. Similarly, Classification F1186 and Guide F1194 created chemical identification and report formatting needed with the extensive chemical resistance that industry was beginning to generate. Finally, the overall test selection and reporting process for chemical protective clothing envisioned by Committee F23 was embodied in Guide F1296.
With standards covering the evaluation of materials for chemical resistance completed, Committee F23 turned to the need to evaluate complete products and a new subcommittee was established. Its first standard was Practice F1052 for pressure testing totally encapsulating chemical protective suits for inward leakage of vapors and gases. This standard, now a test method, is used in evaluating nearly every totally encapsulating suit manufactured in the United States and is also used by local hazardous materials teams for ascertaining the continuing performance of their suits. A related standard, Practice F1359 (now also a test method), was measures the leakage of liquids into entire clothing ensembles. Practice F1154 established a procedure for evaluating the comfort, fit, function, and integrity of chemical protective suits and ensembles using human test subjects.
The Subcommittee on Heat and Flame developed Specification F1002, which set requirements for flame and molten metal protective clothing. Test method F1060 measures conductive heat transfer through insulative materials. Although originally developed under the Physical Properties Subcommittee, Test Method F1358 provided a modified method for measuring the flame resistance of protective clothing, which was not primarily intended for flame or heat protection. The subcommittee also released Guide F1449 for the care and maintenance of flame and thermally protective clothing.
During the 1990s, the Chemical Subcommittee continued to make advances in developing improving its existing standards and adding new standard. The permeation test method (F739) underwent several changes in conjunction with interlaboratory testing to improve the method by which results were uniformly interpreted by test laboratories and included techniques for using other detection systems and determining method sensitivity. A battery of gases was added to Guide F1001 and alternative test protocols were created for conducting penetration testing (F903). Two new test methods were added – Test Method F1383 for conducing intermittent contact permeation testing and Test Method F1407 for a field-type permeation test method.
To assist the healthcare industry with defining the barrier of medical clothing under OSHA’s then new bloodborne pathogen standard, a new subcommittee on biological protection was established. This subcommittee created F23’s first emergency standards ES 21 and ES 22 with the development of test methods to measure protective clothing material resistance to penetration by synthetic blood and a living micro-organism. The two standards, which became Test Methods F1670 and F1671, respectively, defined the basis for medical device claims for surgical gowns and drapes as well as being cited in other clothing standards where bloodborne hazards exist. Test Method F1819 was later developed as a mechanical pressure method for ranking healthcare materials at levels below that demonstrated in F1670.
Concurrently, the Physical Protection Subcommittee worked on a series of test methods and clothing specifications aimed at setting protection levels for protective footwear and chaps used for protection from chainsaws. Separate test methods (F1414 and F1458) were first established and then became part of specifications for the footwear and leg protection items (F1818 and F1897). These standards were augmented by the development of test methods for puncture resistance (F1342) and cut resistance (F1790) improving upon existing industry practice for the measurement of these clothing properties.
The Human Factors Subcommittee, started in the late 1980, addressed growing concerns in the tradeoffs between the protection offered by the clothing and its impact on wearer comfort and function. Its first standard, Test Method F1291, provided a means for measuring the thermal insulation provided by clothing. Practice F1731 was later developed for ensuring consistent body measurements for sizing uniforms and other thermal hazard protective clothing. More recently the subcommittee developed a bench scale method for measuring the breathability and heat transfer characteristics of materials and material system related to comfort as found in Test Method F1868. A new dexterity test method for gloves was also established in Test Method F2010.
F23’s subcommittee on protective clothing programs developed standards to address specific broad needs related to the protective clothing end user community. Practice F1301 established a uniform means for labeling chemical protective clothing to permit ready identification by wearers. Practice F1461 created a comprehensive approach for end users to establish a chemical protective clothing program. Practice F2061 was developed to address procedures for care and maintenance of chemical protective clothing.
During the late 1990s, many of the subcommittees went through changes in direction. The subcommittee on biological hazards focused much of its activity toward the area of medical facemasks. This included the development of synthetic blood penetration resistance test specific to facemasks (Test Method F1862), a bacterial filtration test (Test Method F2101), and a specification for facemask materials (Specification F2100).
Though its efforts to create a universally-accepted thermal protective performance test were not realized, the subcommittee on heat and flame hazards developed two new tests methods. The first involved a very sophisticated instrumented manikin test for evaluating protective garments against very high heat and flame exposures (Test Method F1930). The second provide standardized procedures for conducting radiant heat resistance testing of clothing materials (Test Method F1939).
While the Subcommittee on Particulates was eventually dissolved, its members led the creation of Guide F2053 for documenting particulate testing of protective clothing materials. Similarly, several task groups under the chemical subcommittee worked for years on test methods for evaluation clothing materials against pesticides. These efforts were realized with the development of Test Method F2130 in 2000.
Throughout its years in developing standards, Committee F23 has maintained liaison with several groups, both in the United States and internationally. Many ASTM standards developed by Committee F23 are cited in clothing standards developed by other organizations such as the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). For several years, the U.S. government held joint organization meetings in conjunction with F23 meetings, seeking ways to cooperate on research and avoid duplication of effort. Committee F23 has also been a focal point for international research on protective clothing, particularly through its series of seven international symposia on the performance of protective clothing (see below).
In responding to industry needs and for its own needs to remain efficient, Committee F23 has been reorganized several times with both the addition and dissolution of subcommittees. With some fall off in membership and with a renewed focus on end item specifications, the committee is now organized among five technical committees and six administrative committees:
Technical Subcommittees

F23.20 – Physical Hazards

F23.30 – Chemical Hazards

F23.40 – Biological Hazards

F23.60 – Human Factors

F23.80 – Heat and Flame Hazards


Administrative Subcommittees

F23.90 – Executive

F23.91 – Editorial

F23.92 – Education

F23.93 – Publicity

F23.94 – Symposia

F23.95 – Planning

F23.96 – ISO Technical Advisory Group


While the above history for Committee F23 has been recounted along technical accomplishments, the work of the administrative subcommittees should not go unnoticed. The Editorial Subcommittee is responsible for creating, supplementing, and maintaining the terminology standard (Terminology F1494). The Education and Publicity Subcommittees have presented training programs related to protective clothing during F23 Symposia.
The Symposium Subcommittee has been incredibly successful in arranging well-attended and informative conferences on protective clothing research and development. The first symposium was held in Raleigh, North Carolina and helped to expand both the topics considered by Committee F23 as well as its membership. Successive symposia in Tampa, San Diego, Montreal, San Francisco, Orlando, and Seattle have similarly provided wide exposure of Committee F23 through both the presentations and the Special Technical Publications that have resulted.
For the past decade Committee F23 has participated in the activities of CEN and ISO. Committee F23 holds the Technical Advisory Group from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for ISO Technical Committee 94 Subcommittee 13 on Protective Clothing. In this role, Committee F23 members have promoted the acceptance of our consensus standards by ISO and the harmonization of our standards with those of the standards of national standards bodies. These efforts help bridge the differences between testing approaches and help U.S. businesses to be competitive worldwide.
The achievements of Committee F23 are the result of voluntary contributions from our committee members. Composed of individuals from varied backgrounds, education, training and experience, Committee F23 has made significant contributions toward improving the protection of our fellow workers in the workplace. Their participation is often supported by their employers, to whom we are indebted.
There are many opportunities and challenges ahead for Committee F23. In particular, we can not over emphasize the need for training, education and communication of the standards already developed by Committee F23. Certainly in a climate where some protective clothing technologies have matured, the committee must seek new areas of activity to maintain both membership and continue its contributions for protection of individuals. In a more global economy, Committee F23 must also decide how it will position its standards and interact with other organizations that generally permit less participation than afforded by ASTM. Dealing with these issues will be at the forefront of Committee F23’s work through the next 25 years.
The vision for the future is to help man accomplish his goals with appropriate protective clothing that meets fair and necessary standards. Indeed, if protective clothing is the last line of defense, F23's standards should be developed to give the best protection.
LIST OF STANDARDS
F23 Standards by Year of Introduction

The listing does not follow the alphanumeric listing of standards since some approvals were delayed after the designation of the standard was assigned.
1981
F739-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Protective Clothing Materials to Permeation by Liquids or Gases under Conditions of Continuous Contact
1984
F903-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing to Penetration by Liquids
1985
F955-96 Standard Test Method for Evaluating Heat Transfer through Materials for Protective Clothing Upon Contact with Molten Substances
1986
F1002-96 Standard Performance Specification for Protective Clothing for Use by Workers Exposed to Specific Molten Substances and Related Thermal Hazards
1987
F1052-97 Standard Test Method for Pressure Testing Vapor Protective Ensembles
F1060-01 Standard Test Method for Thermal Protective Performance of Materials for Protective Clothing for Hot Surface Contact
1988
F1154-99a Standard Practices for Qualitatively Evaluating the Comfort, Fit, Function, and Integrity of Chemical-Protective Suit Ensembles
F1186-99 Standard Classification System for Chemicals According to Functional Groups
1989
F1001-99a Standard Guide for Selection of Chemicals to Evaluate Protective Clothing Materials
F1194-99 Standard Guide for Documenting the Results of Chemical Permeation Testing of Materials Used in Protective Clothing
1990
F1301-90(2001) Standard Practice for Labeling Chemical Protective Clothing
F1291-99 Standard Test Method for Measuring the Thermal Insulation of Clothing Using a Heated Manikin
F1296-98 Standard Guide for Evaluating Chemical Protective Clothing
1991
F1296-98 Standard Guide for Evaluating Chemical Protective Clothing
F1342-91(1996) Standard Test Method for Protective Clothing Material Resistance to Puncture
F1359-97 Standard test Method for Determining the Liquid Penetration Resistance Protective Clothing or Protective Ensembles under a Shower Spray While on a Mannequin
1992
F1383-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Protective Clothing Materials to Permeation by Liquids or Gases under Conditions of Intermittent Contact
F1407-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Chemical Protective Clothing Materials to Liquid Permeation-Permeation Cup Method
F1414-99 Standard Test Method for Measurement of Cut Resistance to Chain Saw in Lower Body (Legs) Protective Clothing
F1449-92(2000) Standard Guide for Care and Maintenance of Flame Resistant and Thermally Protective Clothing
1993
F1494-01 Standard Terminology Relating to Protective Clothing

F1461-93(1998) Standard Practice for Chemical Protective Clothing Program



1995
F1358-00 Standard Test Method for Effects of Flame Impingement on Materials Used in Protective Clothing Not Designated Primarily for Flame Resistance
F1670-98 Standard Test Method for Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing to Penetration by Synthetic Blood; Originally published as ES 21
F1671-97b Standard Test Method for Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing to Penetration by Blood-Borne Pathogens Using Phi-X174 Bacteriophage Penetration as a Test System; Originally published as ES 22
1996
F1731-96 Standard Practice for Body Measurements and Sizing of Fire and Rescue Services Uniforms and Other Thermal Hazard Protective Clothing
1997
F1790-97 Standard Test Method for Measuring Cut Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing
F1818-97 Standard Specification for Foot Protection for Chain Saw Users
F1819-98 Standard Test Method for Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing to Penetration by Synthetic Blood Using a Mechanical Pressure Technique
1998
F1458-98 Standard Test Method for Measurement of Cut Resistance to Chain Saw of Foot Protective Devices
F1862-00a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Medical Face Masks to Penetration by Synthetic Blood (Horizontal Projection of Fixed Volume at a Known Velocity)
F1868-98 Standard Test Method for Thermal and Evaporative Resistance of Clothing Materials Using a Sweating Hot Plate
1999
F1930-00 Standard Test Method for Evaluation of Flame Resistant Clothing for Protection against Flash Fire Simulations Using an Instrumented Manikin
F1939-99a Standard Test Method for Radiant Protective Performance of Flame Resistant Clothing Materials
2000
F2010-00 Standard Test Method for Evaluation of Glove Effects on Wearer Hand Dexterity Using a Modified Pegboard Test
F2053-00 Standard Guide for Documenting the Results of Airborne Particle Penetration Testing of Protective Clothing Materials
F2061-00 Standard Practice for Chemical Protective Clothing Care and Maintenance Instructions
2001
F2100-01 Standard Specification for Performance of Materials Used in Medical Face Masks
F2101-01 Standard Test Method for Evaluating the Bacterial Filtration Efficiency (BFE) of Medical Face Mask Materials, Using a Biological Aerosol of Staphylococcus aureus
F2130-01 Standard Test Method for Measuring Repellency, Retention, and Penetration of Liquid Pesticide Formulation through Protective Clothing Materials

F23 Standards by Subcommittee

The listing is based on current committee structure. The year at the end is the year the standard was originally approved

Subcommittee F23.20 on Physical Hazards

F1342-91(1996) Standard Test Method for Protective Clothing Material Resistance to Puncture (1991)


F1414-99 Standard Test Method for Measurement of Cut Resistance to Chain Saw in Lower Body (Legs) Protective Clothing (1992)
F1458-98 Standard Test Method for Measurement of Cut Resistance to Chain Saw of Foot Protective Devices (1998)
F1790-97 Standard Test Method for Measuring Cut Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing (1997)
F1818-97 Standard Specification for Foot Protection for Chain Saw Users (1997)
F1897-98 Standard Specification for Leg Protection for Chain Saw Users (1998)

Subcommittee F23.30 on Chemical Hazards

F739-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Protective Clothing Materials to Permeation by Liquids or Gases under Conditions of Continuous Contact (1981)


F903-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing to Penetration by Liquids (1984)
F1052-97 Standard Test Method for Pressure Testing Vapor Protective Ensembles (1987)
F1001-99a Standard Guide for Selection of Chemicals to Evaluate Protective Clothing Materials (1989)
F1186-99 Standard Classification System for Chemicals According to Functional Groups (1988)
F1194-99 Standard Guide for Documenting the Results of Chemical Permeation Testing of Materials Used in Protective Clothing (1989)
F1296-98 Standard Guide for Evaluating Chemical Protective Clothing (1991)
F1301-90(2001) Standard Practice for Labeling Chemical Protective Clothing (1990)
F1359-97 Standard test Method for Determining the Liquid Penetration Resistance Protective Clothing or Protective Ensembles Under a Shower Spray While on a Mannequin (1991)
F1383-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Protective Clothing Materials to Permeation by Liquids or Gases under Conditions of Intermittent Contact (1992)
F1407-99a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Chemical Protective Clothing Materials to Liquid Permeation-Permeation Cup Method (1992)

F1461-93(1998) Standard Practice for Chemical Protective Clothing Program (1993)

F2053-00 Standard Guide for Documenting the Results of Airborne Particle Penetration Testing of Protective Clothing Materials (2000)


F2061-00 Standard Practice for Chemical Protective Clothing Care and Maintenance Instructions (2000)
F2130-01 Standard Test Method for Measuring Repellency, Retention, and Penetration of Liquid Pesticide Formulation through Protective Clothing Materials (2001)

Subcommittee F23.40 on Biological Hazards

F1670-98 Standard Test Method for Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing to Penetration by Synthetic Blood (1995); Originally published as ES 21


F1671-97b Standard Test Method for Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing to Penetration by Blood-Borne Pathogens Using Phi-X174 Bacteriophage Penetration as a Test System (1995); Originally published as ES 22
F1819-98 Standard Test Method for Resistance of Materials Used in Protective Clothing to Penetration by Synthetic Blood Using a Mechanical Pressure Technique (1997)
F1862-00a Standard Test Method for Resistance of Medical Face Masks to Penetration by Synthetic Blood (Horizontal Projection of Fixed Volume at a Known Velocity) (1998)
F2100-01 Standard Specification for Performance of Materials Used in Medical Face Masks (2001)
F2101-01 Standard Test Method for Evaluating the Bacterial Filtration Efficiency (BFE) of Medical Face Mask Materials, Using a Biological Aerosol of Staphylococcus aureus (2001)

Subcommittee F23.60 on Human Factors

F1154-99a Standard Practices for Qualitatively Evaluating the Comfort, Fit, Function, and Integrity of Chemical-Protective Suit Ensembles (1988)


F1291-99 Standard Test Method for Measuring the Thermal Insulation of Clothing Using a Heated Manikin (1990)
F1731-96 Standard Practice for Body Measurements and Sizing of Fire and Rescue Services Uniforms and Other Thermal Hazard Protective Clothing (1996)
F1868-98 Standard Test Method for Thermal and Evaporative Resistance of Clothing Materials Using a Sweating Hot Plate (1998)
F2010-00 Standard Test Method for Evaluation of Glove Effects on Wearer Hand Dexterity Using a Modified Pegboard Test (2000)

Subcommittee F23.80 on Thermal Hazards

F955-96 Standard Test Method for Evaluating Heat Transfer through Materials for Protective Clothing Upon Contact with Molten Substances (1985)


F1002-96 Standard Performance Specification for Protective Clothing for Use by Workers Exposed to Specific Molten Substances and Related Thermal Hazards (1986)
F1060-01 Standard Test Method for Thermal Protective Performance of Materials for Protective Clothing for Hot Surface Contact (1987)
F1358-00 Standard Test Method for Effects of Flame Impingement on Materials Used in Protective Clothing Not Designated Primarily for Flame Resistance (1995)
F1449-92(2000) Standard Guide for Care and Maintenance of Flame Resistant and Thermally Protective Clothing (1992)
F1930-00 Standard Test Method for Evaluation of Flame Resistant Clothing for Protection against Flash Fire Simulations Using an Instrumented Manikin (1999)
F1939-99a Standard Test Method for Radiant Protective Performance of Flame Resistant Clothing Materials (1999)

Subcommittee F23.91 on Editorial

F1494-01 Standard Terminology Relating to Protective Clothing (1993)




SPECIAL TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS

ASTM STP 900, Performance of Protective Clothing, ASTM STP 900

Editors: R. L. Barker and G. C. Coletta, 1986, 48 papers, pp. 641.
ASTM STP 989, Performance of Protective Clothing: Second Symposium

Editors: S. Z. Mansdorf, R. G. Sager, and A. P. Nielson, 1988, 84 papers, pp. 876.


ASTM STP 1037, Chemical Protective Clothing Performance in Chemical Emergency Response, Editors: J. L. Perkins and J. O. Stull, 1989, 20 papers, pp. 282.
ASTM STP 1133, Performance of Protective Clothing: Fourth Volume

Editors: J. P. McBriarity and N. W. Henry, 1992, 81 papers, pp. 1023.


ASTM STP 1237, Performance of Protective Clothing: Fifth Volume

Editors: J. S. Johnson and S. Z. Mansdorf, 1996, 46 papers, pp. 641.


ASTM STP 1273, Performance of Protective Clothing: Sixth Volume

Editors: J .O. Stull and A. D. Schwope, 1997, papers, pp. 358.


ASTM STP 1386, Performance of Protective Clothing: Issues and Priorities for the 21st Century: Seventh Volume, Editors: C. N. Nelson and N. W. Henry, 2000, papers, pp. 583.

MEETINGS

Organizational Meeting – October 4, 1977 - Valley Forge, PA


January 18-19, 1978 – Philadelphia, PA

June 26-19, 1978 – Boston, MA

January 30-31, 1979 - Lake Buena Vista, FL*


May 22-23, 1979 - San Francisco, CA

January 21-22, 1980 - Ft. Lauderdale, FL*


June 24-25, 1980 - Chicago, IL

January 28-29, 1981 - New Orleans, LA*

June 8-10, 1981 - Philadelphia, PA*


January 18-20, 1982 - Houston, TX

June 22-23, 1982 - Toronto, Canada

January 24-26, 1983 - Atlanta, GA*


June 22-24, 1983 - Kansas City, MO

January 23-25, 1984 - San Diego, CA


July 16-19, 1984 - Raleigh, NC*

(1st Symposium)


January 14-16, 1985 - Reno, NV

June 3-5, 1985 - Washington, DC*

February 3-5, 1986 - Cocoa Beach, FL*

June 18-20, 1986 - Louisville, KY

January 19-23, 1987 - Tampa, FL

(2nd Symposium)

June 24-26, 1987 - Cincinnati, OH

January 25-27, 1988 - Albuquerque, NM

June 29-July 1, 1988 - Baltimore, MD

January 15-20, 1989 - San Diego, CA* (3rd Symposium)

June 28-30, 1989 - Minneapolis, MN*

January 21-24, 1990 - Las Vegas, NV

June 12-14, 1990 - Williamsburg, VA*

January 9-11, 1991 - St. Petersburg, FL*


June 17-21, 1991 - Montreal, Canada*

(4th Symposium)


January 29-31, 1992 - New Orleans, LA

June 10-12, 1992 - Rosemont, IL*


January 20-22, 1993 - San Antonio, TX

June 23-25, 1993 - Atlanta, GA


January 25-27, 1994 – San Francisco, CA* (5th Symposium)

June 8-10, 1994 - Pittsburgh, PA*


February 12-15, 1995 - Tempe, AZ*

June 21-23, 1995 - Denver, CO


January 31-Feb 2, 1996 - Atlanta, GA


June 16-17, 1996 - Orlando, FL

(6th Symposium)

January 15-17, 1997 - New Orleans, LA

June 18-20, 1997 - St. Louis, MO

January 14-16, 1998 - San Diego, CA

June 17-19, 1998 - Atlanta, GA

January 27-29, 1999 - Memphis, TN

June 28-July 1, 1999 - Seattle, WA

(7th Symposium)

January 26-28, 2000 - New Orleans, LA

June 21-23, 2000 - Toronto, Canada

January 24-26, 2001 - Reno, NV

June 27-29, 2001 - Norfolk, VA

January 23-24, 2002 - Dallas, TX




* Independent meeting (not part of an ASTM Committee Week)

SYMPOSIA



International Symposium on the Performance of Protective Clothing

Symposium Chairmen: Roger L. Barker (North Carolina State University) and Gerard C. Coletta (Risk Control Services)

July 16-20, 1984 –Mission Valley Inn, Raleigh, NC


Second International Symposium on the Performance of Protective Clothing

Cosponsors: Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden and Personal Protective Devices Committee of the American Industrial Hygiene Association

Symposium Chairmen: Zack Mansdorf (S. Z. Mansdorf & Associates), Richard G. Sager (Sager Corporation), and Alan P. Nielson (U. S. Environmental Protection Agency)

January 19-21, 1987 – Hyatt Regency, Tampa, FL


Third International Symposium on Protective Clothing: Chemical Protective Clothing Performance in Chemical Emergency Response

Symposium Chairmen: Jimmy L. Perkins (University of Alabama at Birmingham) and Jeffrey O. Stull (Texas Research Institute)

January 16-17, 1989 –Town & Country Hotel, San Diego, CA


Fourth Symposium on the Performance of Protective Clothing: Challenges for Developing Protective Clothing for the 1990s

Cosponsor: Institut de Recherche en Sante et en Securite du Travail de Quebec (IRSST)

Symposium Chairmen: James P. McBriarity (ICI Americas) and Norman W. Henry, III (E. I. Dupont de Nemours & Company)

June 18-20, 1991 – Hotel des Gouverneurs Le Grand, Montreal, Quebec


Fifth International Symposium on the Performance of Protective Clothing: Improvement through Innovation

Cosponsor: Institut de Recherche en Sante et en Securite du Travail de Quebec (IRSST)

Symposium Chairmen: James S. Johnson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and Zack Mansdorf (Liberty International)

January 25-27, 1994 – San Francisco Hilton and Towers, San Francisco, CA

Sixth International Symposium on the Performance of Protective Clothing: Emerging Protection Technologies

Symposium Chairmen: Jeffrey O. Stull (International Personnel Protection) and Arthur D. Schwope (Arthur D. Little)

June 18-19, 1996 – Rosen Omni Hotel, Orlando, FL


Seventh International Symposium on the Performance of Protective Clothing: Issues and Priorities for the 21st Century

Symposium Chairpersons: Cherilyn N. Nelson (Ansell Perry) and Norman W. Henry, III (E. I. Dupont de Nemours & Company)

June 28-30, 1999 – Sheraton Towers, Seattle, WA



PAST CHAIRPERSONS AND VICE CHAIRPERSONS




Chairman:

Gerald Hess, 1977-1979

Gerard Coletta, 1980-1985

Norman W. Henry III, 1986-1989

Arthur D. Schwope, 1990-1993

S. Z. “Zack” Mansdorf, 1994-1995

Earl Trawick, 1996-1999

Cherilyn Nelson, 2000 - Present



Vice Chairman:

Alan Sisson, 1977-1978

R. Ladick, 1979-1981

Bobby Sasser, 1982-1985

Gerard Coletta, 1986-1989

Jeffrey O. Stull, 1990-1993

Roger L. Barker, 1994-1995

James S. Johnson, 1996-1999

Jeffrey O. Stull, 2000 - Present

STAFF MANAGERS

Jim Thomas, 1977-1979

Drew Azzara, 1980-1986

Ann McKlindon, 1987-1988

John Vowell, 1989-1991

Steve Mawn, 1992- Present


AWARDS OF MERIT

Coleman Bryan, 1985

Arthur D. Schwope, 1988

Norman W. Henry III, 1993

S. Z. “Zack” Mansdorf, 1995

Jeffrey O. Stull, 1999






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