C. A. Jennings us geological Survey



Download 279.04 Kb.
Page2/3
Date conversion31.03.2018
Size279.04 Kb.
1   2   3

Acknowledgements

This project was funded by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Coastal Resources Division (CRD) and the Federal Sportfish Restoration Fund. D. Haymans and S. Woodward helped all along the way to the project’s completion. C. Belcher provided critical guidance and technical assistance. B. Warren provided insightful editorial comments to an earlier draft of this manuscript. J. Franks provided invaluable technical advice on many aspects of tripletail life history and biology. Staff at GADNR CRD including P. Geer, C. Kinstle, C.Kalinowsky, G. Gaddis, S. Jordan, E. Robillard, D. McDowell, K. Herrin, L. Willis, K. Wolfe, G. Meeks, J. Mericle, D. Guadagnoli, P. Medders, W. Hughes, J. Page, B. Readdick, R. Flournoy, E. Butler and D.Varnadoe provided field and technical assistance with the project.

Anglers including those from the Coastal Conservation Association of Georgia and especially G. Hildreth provided assistance with field sampling. The GA Cooperative Research Unit is jointly sponsored by the GA Department of Natural Resources, the University of Georgia, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Wildlife Management Insitute. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
References

Armstrong, M. P., Crabtree R. E., Murphy, M. D., & Muller, R. G. (1996). A stock assessment of tripletail, Lobotes surinamensis, in Florida waters. Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Marine Research Institution Publication.

Baughman, J. L. (1941). On the occurrence in the Gulf Coast waters of the United

States of the tripletail, Lobotes surinamensis, with notes on its natural history. The American Naturalist 75, 569-579.

Benson, N. G. (1982). Life history requirements of selected finfish and shellfish in the

Mississippi Sound and adjacent areas. US Fish and Wildlife Service Biological



Services Program Technical Report No. 81.

Breder, C. M. (1949). On the behavior of young Lobotes surinamensis. Copeia 4, 237-242.

Brown-Peterson, N. J., Overstreet, R. M., Lotz, J. M., Franks, J.S., & Burns, K. M.. (2000). Reproductive biology of cobia, Rachycentron canadum, from coastal waters of the southern United States. Fisheries Bulletin 99, 15-28.

Brown-Peterson, N. J. & Franks, J. S. (2001). Aspects of the reproductive biology of

tripletail, Lobotes surinamensis, in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Proceedings of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute 52, 586-597.

Brown-Peterson, N. J., Wyanski D. M., Saborido-Rey, F., Macewicz, B. J., &

Lowerre-Barbieri, S. K. (2011). A standardized terminology for describing reproductive development in fishes. Marine and Coastal Fisheries 3, 52–70.

Ceapa, C., Williot, P., Le Menn, F., & Davail-Cuisset, B. (2002). Plasma sex steroids and vitellogenin levels in stellate sturgeon (Acipenser Stellatus Pallas) during spawning migration in the Danube River. Journal of Applied Ichthyology 18, 391-396.

Cooper, D. C. (2002). Spawning Patterns of Tripletail, Lobotes surinamensis, on the Atlantic Coast of Florida. Master’s Thesis. Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL.

Denslow, N. D., Chow, M., Kroll, K. J., & Green, K. J. (1999). Vitellogenin as a biomarker of exposure to estrogen or estrogen mimics. Ecotoxicology 8, 385-398.

Ditty, J. G. and Shaw, R. F. (1994). Larval development of tripletail, Lobotes surinamensis

(Pisces, Lobotidae), and their spatial and temporal distribution in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Fishery Bulletin 92, 33-45.

Franks, J. S., Warren, J. R., Wilson, D. P., Garder, N. M. & Larsen, K. M. (1998). Potential of fin spines and fin rays for estimating the age of tripletail, Lobotes surinamensis, from the northern Gulf of Mexico. Proceedings of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute 50, 1022-1037.

Franks, J. S., Ogle, J. T., Hendon, R., Barnes, D. N. & Nicholson, L. C. (2001). Growth of captive juvenile tripletail Lobotes surinamensis. Gulf and Caribbean Research 1, 75-78.

Freund, R. J. & Littell, R. C. (1991). SAS system for regression, 2nd edition. SAS Institute, Cary, North Carolina.

Goncalves, J. M. S. & Erzini, K.. (2000). The reproductive biology of Spondyliosoma cantharus (L.) from the SW Coast of Portugal. Scienta Marina 64, 403-411.

Gudger, E. W. (1931). The triple-tail, Lobotes surinamensis, Its names, occurrence on our

coasts and its natural history. The American Naturalist 65, 49-69.

Hardy, J. D. (1978). Development of fishes of the Mid-Atlantic Bight: an atlas of egg,

larval and juvenile stages. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Biological Service Program FSW/BSP78/12.

Heise, R. J., Bringolf, R. B., Patterson, R., Cope, W. G. & Ross, S. T. (2009). Plasma vitellogenin and estradiol concentrations in adult Gulf Sturgeon from the Pascagoula River Drainage, Mississippi. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 138, 1028-1035.

Heppell, S. A & Sullivan, C. V. (2000). Identification of gender and reproductive maturity in the absence of gonads: muscle tissue levels of sex steroids and vitellogenin in Gag (Mycteroperca microlepis). Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 57, 148-159.

Kelly, H. A. (1923). Triple-tail numerous in North Carolina. Copeia 124, 109-111.

Lowerre-Barbieri, S. K., Brown-Peterson, N. J., Murua, H., Tomkiewicz, J., Wyanski, D. M. & Saborido-Rey, F. (2011). Emerging issues and methodological advances in Fisheries Reproductive Biology. Marine and Coastal Fisheries 3, 32-51.

Merriner, J. V. & Foster, W. A. (1974). Life history aspects of the tripletail, Lobotes surinamensis (Chordata-Pisces-Lobotidae), in North Carolina Waters. Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 90, 121-124.

Nikolsky, G. (1963). The Ecology of Fishes. Academic Press, New York.

Parr, R.T. 2011. Age, growth, and reproductive status of tripletail (Lobotes surinamensis) in the aggregation nearshore Jekyll Island, GA, USA. MS Thesis. University of Georgia.

Streich, M. K., C. A. Kalinowsky, & Peterson, D. L. (2013). Residence, habitat use, and movement patterns of Atlantic tripletail in the Ossabaw Sound Estuary, Georgia. Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management and Ecosystem Science 5, 291-302.

Strelcheck, A. J., Jackson, J. B., Cowan Jr., J. H., & Shipp R. L. (2004). Age, growth,



diet and reproductive biology of tripletail, Lobotes surinamensis, from the north-central Gulf of Mexico. Gulf of Mexico Science 22, 45-53.

West, G. (1990). Methods of assessing ovarian development in fishes: A Review. Australian Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research 41, 199-222.

Wildhaber, M. L., Papoulias, D. M., DeLonay, A. J., Tillitt, D. E., Bryan, J. L. & Annis, M. L. (2007). Physical and hormonal examination of Missouri River shovelnose sturgeon reproductive stage: A Reference Guide. Journal of Applied Ichthyology 23,382-401.

Table I. Reproductive phases of individual male tripletail (n = 122) captured in 2009 and 2010 near Jekyll Island, GA, USA. All males in this study in the regressing phase were spawning capable but were not undergoing active spermatogenesis. GE = germinal epithelium.

 

 

Developing

 

Spawning Capable

 

 

Month

Immature

Early

Developing

 

Early GE

Mid GE

Late GE

Regressing

Regenerating

March

0

0

0




0

0

0

0

0

April

0

1

0




0

2

1

1

0

May

0

1

4




6

9

6

8

0

June

1

0

0




5

20

21

3

0

July

0

0

0




3

12

12

1

0

August

0

0

0




0

2

2

1

0



Table II. Reproductive phases of individual female tripletail (n = 102) captured in 2009 and 2010 near Jekyll Island, GA, USA.

 

 

Developing

 

Spawning Capable

 

 

Month

Immature

Early

Developing

 

Spawning Capable

Actively Spawning

Regressing

Regenerating

March

0

1

0




1

0

0

0

April

7

6

0




0

1

0

2

May

14

2

0




0

0

2

5

June

18

0

0




0

1

2

15

July

4

0

3




5

0

0

9

August



0

 0

 

2

 0

1

1





Figure 1. Tripletail sampling location near Jekyll Island, GA, USA. Inset shows a map of the southeast United States with the Jekyll Island area indicated by the arrow. Each point on the map indicates that one or more tripletail were captured at that location from March to August 2009 and 2010.

Figure 2. Non-linear regression of sexually mature female tripletail in 50-mm length bins captured near Jekyll Island, GA, USA from March to August 2009 and 2010. Closed data points represent actual cumulative percent maturity of females, whereas males are represented by the open data points. The dashed line denotes the length (459 mm) at which 50% of female tripletail are mature. The dotted line represents the minimum size limit (457 mm) currently enforced by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Non-linear regression models for males were unable to converge and therefore were unable to be modeled; however, only one male captured in this study was classified as immature.



Figure 3. Non-linear regression of sexually mature female and male tripletail by age class captured near Jekyll Island, GA, USA from March to August 2009 and 2010. Closed data points represent actual cumulative percent maturity of females; males are represented by the open data points. The dotted line denotes the age at which 50% of males (0.55 years) and females (1.17 years) are mature.



Figure 4. Mean gonadosomatic index values for (A) female (n = 101) and (B) male (n = 116) tripletail captured near Jekyll Island, GA, USA from March to August 2009 and 2010. Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals.

1   2   3


The database is protected by copyright ©ininet.org 2016
send message

    Main page