Guy Fawkes ks2 lesson plan Two lessons on the Gunpowder Plot and Guy Fawkes Curriculum areas: History, Citizenship Supporting Resources: Remember, Remember poem, acrostic poem worksheet, storyboard worksheet, ‘Have Your Say’ worksheet



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Guy Fawkes KS2 lesson plan

Two lessons on the Gunpowder Plot and Guy Fawkes


Curriculum areas: History, Citizenship Supporting Resources: Remember, Remember poem, acrostic poem worksheet, storyboard

worksheet, ‘Have Your Say worksheet

Lesson 1
Starter

Begin with class discussion about how much the students know about Guy Fawkes

& Bonfire Night. Explain that Bonfire Night is to remember the famous plot in 1605 when seven men attempted to blow up the King and Parliament and that it became known as the Gunpowder Plot.

Whole class activity

Explain the event to the class and also explain that the cellars in Parliament are still checked by guards every year just before the start of the Royal State Opening of Parliament ceremony.

Look at the ‘Remember, Remember’ poem. The whole class could recite this

together.




Group activity

Ask the students to carry out a storyboarding task in small groups, using the storyboard worksheet. They should cut out the storyboard cards and put them into the correct sequence for the story. This will check their understanding of the story.



Summary of key points

In small groups, pairs or individually, the students should write an acrostic poem using the words ‘Gunpowder Plot’ and selecting key points from the story.


Plenary

Write a class acrostic poem, using ideas from the students’ own poems.


Lesson 2
Starter

Hand out the storyboard card sort from the previous lesson and see which group can put the story together in the fastest time.


Whole class activity

Each person should choose a character from the story. In pairs they should discuss (or write down) three facts about what happened to that person and how they must have felt at different points in the story. Ask for a volunteer to ‘take the hot seat’. Ask that person (in character) a series of questions about their identity, their role in the plot, their motivations for their actions and how it made them feel. Always reassure the students that the person in the hot seat is in character and not answering the questions as themselves.

The class should try to think of questions to ask. Ask for further volunteers to take the hot seat.
Group activity

In pairs or small groups ask the students to ‘have their say’ on what Robert Catesby and the gang did and what happened to them. They should record their thoughts on the ‘Have Your Say’ worksheet.


Summary of key points

Ask students to feedback their opinions from this exercise and facilitate a whole class discussion. This exercise will allow you to explore the concept of taking responsible action to bring about change. Summarise the discussion into three or four key points.


Plenary

Take a look back at the ‘Remember Remember’ poem. Ask the students to create a

new poem, song or rap in remembrance of the Gunpowder Plot. Finish by sharing some of these with the class.

Gunpowder Plot worksheet


Remember, Remember
Remember, remember the fifth of November, The gunpowder treason and plot.

I see no reason why gunpowder treason

Should ever be forgot.


Guy Fawkes, ‘twas his intent

To blow up King and parliament. Three score barrels were laid below To prove old England's overthrow.


By God's mercy he was catched,

With a dark lantern and lighted match. Holler boys, holler boys, let the bells ring Holler boys, holler boys, God save the King



Gunpowder Plot worksheet

Acrostic poem

G is for the guards searching the cellar for the gunpowder. U ................................................................................................................................ N ................................................................................................................................ P ................................................................................................................................. O ............................................................................................................................... W ................................................................................................................................ D ................................................................................................................................. E ................................................................................................................................. R .................................................................................................................................

P ................................................................................................................................ L ................................................................................................................................ O ................................................................................................................................ T .....................................................................................................................


Key words from the story: tunnel, dig, cellar, letter, Lord Monteagle, Robert Catesby, Parliament, hung, drawn, quartered, Tower of London, torture, rack, Catholic, Protestant, religion, arrest, barrels, matches, Royal State Opening of Parliament ceremony.

Gunpowder Plot worksheet

Have Your Say

Robert Catesby and the plotters were all Catholic. The Protestant King and Parliament would not let them practice their religion. What do you think about this?


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Do you think Robert Catesby and the plotters were right to challenge the

King and Parliament? Explain your answer.
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What do you think about the way they decided to take action?


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Do you think it was right that the plotters were put to death? Explain your answer.


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Gunpowder Plot worksheet

Storyboard

Plotting

Robert Catesby gathers a group of seven men to help him in a plot to blow up the King James I and Parliament at the Royal State Opening of Parliament on 5 November. He has to persuade them to join him. He reminds them that the King is not letting Catholics practise their religion. The gang are very angry and think the King deserves to die.



Digging the Tunnel

In May 1604 Guy Fawkes and Thomas Percy find a house very near to Parliament and rent it. Fawkes called himself John Johnson and pretends he is Percy's servant. They then began to dig a tunnel underground from their rented house to Parliament to smuggle in the gunpowder. They dig, and they dig and they dig...



Planting the gunpowder

In March1605 the gang have a stroke of luck. A cellar underneath the House of Lords comes up for rent. They can abandon their digging and rent the cellar. They put 36 barrels of gunpowder in the cellar ready for the Royal State Opening of Parliament. They cover the barrels with fire wood to disguise them in case anyone looked inside.



Lord Monteagles letter

Lord Monteagle, a very important man and friend of King James, is given a letter at dinner on October 26th 1605. A tall, mysterious stranger had handed it to his servant in the street earlier in the evening. He takes his mystery letter to show to friends in the government, but they are slow to act. King James I is away hunting and many ministers are suspicious that it is a fake.




Guy Fawkes in the cellar

The gang find out about the letter but they are determined to carry out their plot. On the afternoon of 5 November 1605, Guy Fawkes takes up his position in the cellar with his matches and waits

for the ceremony to start. Soldiers come to check the cellar. On first look they find nothing and just question Guy Fawkes. They return to check again and find the gunpowder. Guy Fawkes is

arrested and taken to see the King.


King, Tower and Torture

King James I is furious. He demands that Guy Fawkes reveal the names of anyone else involved with the plot. Guy Fawkes is determined not to give them up, even when the King threatens him with imprisonment in the Tower of London. He is sent to the Tower where is he tortured on a rack.



He eventually gives them the names of the other plotters.


Hung, Drawn and Quartered!

The gang are caught and publically hung, drawn and quartered. Their heads are placed on sticks for everyone to see what punishment awaits anyone who might plot to kill the King.


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