H101 History of Art and Visual Culture Fall, 2015



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H101 History of Art and Visual Culture

Fall, 2015

Lecture: T + TH 11:20 - 12:20 RISD Auditorium

Section: 1 ½ hour various times and locations. Consult your class schedule
Course Staff:

Lecturers: Professor Mary Bergstein, Professor Bolaji Campbell, Professor Daniel Harkett, Professor, Leora Malz Leca, Professor Ijlal Muzaffar and Professor Susan Ward

Section Instructors: Professor Katheryn Howley, Professor Pascale Rihouet, Professor Suzanne Scanlan, Professor Rachel Silberstein, Professor Esther Thyssen, Professor Elena Varshavskaya, Professor Fatimeh Abbas Zahed and the course lecturers.
Course Coordinator: Professor Susan Ward (slward@risd.edu)

Course Description

History of Art and Visual Culture 101 is an introduction to global issues in art and visual culture. The course does not and does not intend to provide comprehensive art historical coverage. Its goals are to present elements of the world visual traditions and to introduce basic methodology to interpret them. With these tools in hand, students will be in the position to pursue their interests in specialized courses in subsequent semesters.


Forms of Assessment and Grading Breakdown

15% Attendance & Participation

15% First paper. Deadline: due the week of Oct. 1

25% Midterm exam: the week of Oct. 15

15% Second paper. Deadline: due the week of Nov .19

30% FINAL EXAM: THURSDAY DEC 10 2015



SEE YOUR SECTION INSTRUCTOR FOR YOUR SPECIFIC DUE DATES FOR ASSIGNMENTS.
Attendance & Absences

Per RISD policy, each student is allowed a total of two unexcused absences from lecture or section meeting. Each unexcused absence beyond this limit will reduce your attendance grade by a third of a letter grade. To have your absence excused in case of a personal emergency, you must contact the instructor as soon as possible and provide documentation of your emergency.


Punctuality

Please arrive on time for section meetings and lectures. Late arrivals disrupt the class and will affect your grade negatively. A late arrival might count as an unexcused absence.




Class Participation

Class participation is a vital element of this course. Our goal is to have lively discussions of the images, readings, and relevant issues. You should see effective participation as both an aid to learning and a skill that can be learned.


REQUIRED READINGS
BOOKS:

Willet, Frank. African Art. New York: Thames and Hudson, 2002.

Sontag, Susan. On Photography. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1977.
If you have never taken an art history course there are several excellent art history textbooks. We recommend: Stokstad, Marilyn & Michael W. Cothren. Art: A Brief History. Boston: Pearson, 2012.

The books listed above are on reserve at the RISD LIBRARY.


ARTICLES AND ONLINE RESOURCES listed in the course schedule are available on e-reserve at the RISD Library and in the class digication portfolio: https://digicationlogin.risd.edu
Paper Formatting Guidelines

Papers should be typed in twelve-point Times New Roman font and double-spaced. Margins should be one inch on all sides. Use the Chicago Manual of Style humanities style for citations. For a brief guide, with examples, go to:

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html
Assignments

All assignments should be completed in time and handed in on the date specified on the syllabus. Late papers will be downgraded by a third of a letter grade per day of delay. For example, a B paper that is one day late will get a B-; if it is three days late, it will receive a C. All papers should be submitted in print and stapled unless otherwise specified by the instructor.


Exams

Exams must be taken on the date and time specified on the syllabus. Students are not entitled to a make-up exam except in properly documented emergencies. If you have an emergency, you must contact the instructor as soon as possible. Students who fail both exams, fail the class regardless of grades in other assignments.


Academic honesty

Students are expected to be honest in their work and not engage in cheating, plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty. For further specifics see RISD’s Academic Code of Conduct: http://www.risd.edu/Policies/Academic/Code_of_Conduct/




LECTURE SCHEDULE:
Week 1

INTRODUCTIONS AND FOUNDATIONS
Thurs. Sept 10—Lecture 1: Introduction Professor Ward

Reading: Alexandra Peers, “Canon Fodder.” http://www.artnews.com/2006/02/01/canon-fodder/

Week 2

Tues. Sept 15 Lecture 2: Classical Art, Professor Bergstein



Reading: Mary Beard, “House and Home,” from Pompeii: The

Life of a Roman Town.   London: Profile Books, 2010. Pp. 81-119.

Marguerite Yourcenar, That Mighty Sculptor,



Time. Trans. Walter Kaiser. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1992.

Optional reading: Ingrid Rowland, "The Grandest Sculpture of the

Ancients", NewYork Review of Books, August2015. 

http://www.nybooks.com/shared/1aa754fc99e7cf3b62af9432f13aebab


Thurs. Sept 17 Lecture 3: Why won’t classical architecture go away? Professor Muzaffar

Reading: Sophia Psarra. “The Parthenon and the Erechtheion: the architectural formation of place, politics, and myth.” Journal of Architecture 9 (Spring 2004): 77-104.
Week 3

ART AND RELIGION

Tues. Sept 22 Lecture 4: The Christian Basilica, Professor Ward

Reading: Roger Stalley, “The Christian Basilica,” Chapter 1, Early Medieval Architecture. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. Pp. 17-36
Thurs. Sept 24 Lecture 5: Rock Art: Professor Campbell

Reading: Willett, Frank. African Art. New York: Thames and Hudson, 2002. Pp. 42-61

Week 4

Tues. Sept. 29 Lecture 6: Islamic Art and Architecture, Professor Ward



Reading: Jerrilyn Dodds, “The Great Mosque at Cordoba,” from Al-Andalus: The Art of Islamic Spain. Pp. 11-26. (metmuseum.org/research/metpublications/Al_Andalus_The_Art_of_Isamic_Spain)

Thurs. Oct. 1 Lecture 7 Masking Traditions: Honoring Our Mothers Professor Campbell

Reading: Willett, Frank. African Art. New York: Thames and Hudson,

2002. Pp. 130-149; 157-170


Week 5


Tues. Oct. 6 Lecture 8 Medieval Manuscripts and Sculpture Professor Ward

Reading: Illene Forsyth, “The Ganymede Capital at Vézelay,” Gesta 15 (1976): 241-246.



NATURALISM AND IDEALISM

Thurs. Oct. 8 Lecture 9 Sculptures of Ancient Nigeria: Nok, Igbo Ukwu, Ife, and

Benin, Professor Campbell

Reading: Willett, Frank. African Art. New York: Thames and Hudson, 2002. Pp. 63-75; 97-103


Week 6


NO SECTIONS MONDAY Oct. 12 RISD Holiday
Tues. Oct. 13 Lecture 10 Michelangelo in Rome, Professor Bergstein

Reading: Maria Loh, “Outscreaming the Laocoön: Sensation, Special Effects and the Moving Image.” Oxford Art Journal, 34 (2011): 393-414.

Sorabella, Jean. "The Nude in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. (January 2008).

Department of European Paintings. "The Papacy and the Vatican Palace". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–.(October 2002).

Department of European Paintings. "The Rediscovery of Classical Antiquity". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–.(October 2002).

Bambach, Carmen. "Renaissance Drawings: Material and Function". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–.(October 2002).


Thurs. Oct 15 Lecture 11 The Venetian Alternative, Professor Bergstein

Readings: Patricia Fortini Brown, “Venezianità: The Otherness of the Venetians,” from Art and Life in Renaissance Venice. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1997. Map and pp. 1-37.

Carboni, Stefano, and Trinita Kennedy, and Elizabeth Marwell. "Islamic Art and Culture: the Venetian Perspective". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–.(March 2007).

Carboni, Stefano, and Trinita Kennedy, and Elizabeth Marwell. "Venice and the Islamic World, 828–1797". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–.(March 2007).

Carboni, Stefano, and Trinita Kennedy, and Elizabeth Marwell. "Venice's Principal Muslim Trading Partners: the Mamluks, the Ottomans, and the Safavids". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–.(March 2007).

Week 7


MODERNITY
Tues. Oct. 20 Lecture 12 The Academy and the French Revolution, Professor Harkett

Reading: Félibien des Avaux, André. From the preface to Conférence de l’Academie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture (1669), translated by Linda Walsh. In Art and Its Histories: A Reader, edited by Steve Edwards. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999: 34-36

“David Commemorates the Martyrs of the Revolution.” In Neoclassicism and Romanticism, 1750-1850, edited by Lorenz Eitner. Vol. 1. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1970: 132-34.
Thurs. Oct. 22 Lecture 13 Representing the Modern City Professor Harkett

Reading Extract from Charles Baudelaire, “The Painter of Modern Life.” In The Painter of Modern Life and Other Essays, translated and edited by Jonathan Mayne. New York: Da Capo Press, 1986: 5-15.


Week 8

Tues. Oct. 27 Lecture 14 The Avant-Garde and the Female Nude, Professor Harkett

Reading: “Various authors on Manet’s Olympia.” In Art in Theory, 1815-1900: An Anthology of Changing Ideas, edited by Charles Harrison and Paul Wood, with Jason Gaiger. Oxford: Blackwell, 1998, 514-519.

Thurs. Oct. 29 Lecture 15 Bauhaus and the Making of the Modern Subject,

Professor Muzaffar

Readings: Leah Dickerman, "Bauhaus Fundamentals." In Bauhaus: Workshops for Modernity, edited by Barry Bergdoll and Leah Dickerman. New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2010. Pp. 15-39.

Week 9

MODERNISM AND ITS OTHERS
Tues. Nov. 3 Lecture 16 The Social History of Photography, Professor Bergstein

Reading: Susan Sontag. On Photography. New York: Farrar, Straus and

Giroux, 1977.
Thurs. Nov 5 Lecture 17 Modernism and Colonialism, Professor Maltz-Leca

Reading: Abigail Solomon-Godeau, “Going Native.” Art in America 77(1989): 118-129.


Week 10


Tues. Nov. 10 Lecture 18 Ornamentation and Structure in Modern Architecture: Loos and

Le Corbusier, Professor Muzaffar

Reading (ONLINE RESOURCE): 
Loos, Adolf. “Ornament and Crime (1908).” In Programs and manifestoes on 20th-century architecture, edited by Ulrich Conrads.
Thurs. Nov. 12 Lecture 19 Modernism and Abstraction, Professor Maltz-Leca

Reading: Malevich, Kazimir. Suprematism

Mondrian, Piet. Natural Reality and Abstract Reality (1919)

Week 11


Tues. Nov. 17 Lecture 20 Displaying Art: From the Salon to the White Cube, Professor

Harkett No Reading



THE MODERN COLONIAL AT HOME AND ABROAD
Thurs. Nov. 19 Lecture 21 Art and Popular Culture: American Art in the 1960s,

Professor Maltz-Leca

Reading: Anne M. Wagner, “Warhol Paints History, or Race in America.” Representations 55 (1996): 98-119.

Week 12


Tues. Nov. 24 Lecture 22 Architecture as Environment + Desired (Dys)topia: From

Capital Cities to Slums in the Third World, Professor Muzaffar

Reading: Rem Koolhaas, "Lagos: Harvard Project on the City," in

Mutations. Barcelona: ACTAR, 2000. Pp. 651-719.

Vikramaditya Prakash “Introduction,” in Chandigarh’s Le Corbusier: the Struggle for Modernity in Postcolonial India. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2001.



THANKSGIVING BREAK NO CLASSES Wednesday Nov 25-Sunday Nov. 29

Week 13


Tues. Dec. 1 Lecture 23 Postmodern, Postcolonial: Re-reading Modernism,

Professor Maltz-Leca

Reading: Hal Foster, "Postmodernism: 1984" Art Since 1900. New York: Thames and Hudson, 2005.
Thurs. Dec. 3 Lecture 24 Contemporary Art in and Out of Africa: Diasporic Resonance, Professor Campbell

Readings: Frank Willett. African Art. New York: Thames and Hudson,

2002. Pp. 220-255

Week 14


Sections meet Monday Dec. 7 and Wednesday Dec. 9. There are no classes (including lecture) on Tuesday Dec. 8
LIBERAL ARTS EXAM DAY THURSDAY Dec. 10.


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