Mis 730: Integrating is technologies



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MIS 730:

Integrating IS Technologies



Semester: Fall 2014

Class Location: Babbio 320

Jeffrey Nickerson

jnickerson@stevens.edu

Babbio 631

Office hours: Thursday 3-5 pm.




Overview / Catalog Description

This course focuses on ways of designing and integrating an information systems architecture. The course explains the different forms of corporate information systems and their interaction. While in the past, large computer systems were often self-contained, in current systems, it is more likely that such systems are part of an overall architecture including many smaller hardware devices and operating systems. The student will learn about the building blocks of current IS architectures, and then will learn how to connect them to solve problems. In particular, the student will gain an understanding of principles of design, including the control of memory hierarchies, ways of modularizing, ways of parallelizing tasks, ways of generating a new architecture, and ways of evaluating the architecture.


Introduction to Course

While information systems students are trained in ideas relating to enterprise systems, they often are not familiar with full extent of the technologies underlying an integrated information systems architecture. This course grounds students in this underlying technology, and then teaches them how to connect components to form an architecture that will answer the needs of institutions.


These architectures are important to those dedicated a career in information systems: the architectures must be understood in order to function in an IS department. These architectures are important for managers as well as analysts and programmers: managers are expected to understand a systems diagram of present systems and speak to the fit of a proposed architecture for accomplishing institutional goals.
Thus, the course will make students proficient in the vocabulary and grammar of modern enterprise systems, the techniques for integrating them, and this proficiency will be useful throughout the students’ careers.



Learning Goals




  1. By the end of this course, students will be able to formulate a series of plausible alternative designs for integrating technologies.

  2. Students will know the different components of IS architectures, how they work, and how they integrate with each other.

  3. Students will improve their ability to communicate about design in group and presentation settings.




Required Text

The instructor will supply readings and notes periodically in class.

In addition, the following Wikipedia entries are required reading. When reading the entries, you are encouraged to read more deeply in the related entries.

Personal Information Manager

Personal Information Management

Cache


Software Architecture

Abstraction layer

Network devices

Internet Protocol Suite


Merge-sort

Storage hierarchy

Moore’s law

Disk Drives

Data Parallelism

Task Parallelism

RAM memory

Artificial Intelligence

Multi-core

Scalability

RAID

SaaS (Software as a Service)



Cloud Computing

Solid State Drives

Autonomic computing

Social Network



Map Reduce

Client-Queue-Client

Tradeoff

Two-phase locking


Service-oriented Architecture

Message Passing

Unified Modeling Language

Design Pattern

Asynchronous I/O

Decision Tree

Bayesian Inference

Cognition






Suggestions for supplemental reading

There are three suggested texts, which complement each other. The first book is general, about design, providing methods for designing systems and other things. The second book explains the ideas and standards relating to enterprise architecture. The third book is more technical, discussing the kinds of problems architects will face, and providing some potential solutions. The books do not address in detail some of specific issues that drive the design of systems, and so I have assigned Wikipedia articles that supplement the books and the lectures.


Brooks, F. P. The Design of Design: Essays from a computer scientist, Addison-Wesley 2010.
A book about the design of systems (and other things) from the author of the mythical man month
Lankhorst, M. Enterprise Architecture at Work: Modelling, Communication and Analysis, 2nd ed., 2009, Springer (or the 1st edition, available in the library in electronic form for download.)
A high-level look at systems architecture
Garland, J., and Anthony, R. Large-Scale Software Architecture: A Practical Guide using UML, Wiley, 2003.
A software architecture book, using UML. More technical than the Lankhorst text.
Other Texts:

Maier, M.W. and Rechtin, E. The Art of Systems Architecting,2nd Edition, CRC Press, 2000.
The book contains good heuristics for how to design systems, with a focus on military systems.
Fowler, M. Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture, Addison Wesley, 2002.
This is a technical book, more so than Garland, with Java code associated with the different patterns.
Erl, T. SOA Design Patterns, Prentice Hall, 2009.
This book focuses specifically on Service Oriented Architecture.
Baldwin, C. Y. and K. B. Clark (2000). Design rules. Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press.
This book is about modularity.
Shaw, M. and D. Garlan (1996). Software architecture: perspectives on an emerging discipline. Upper Saddle River, N.J., Prentice Hall.
A good academic book on software.







Assignments

Students will master the conceptual material through the lectures and the associated readings. They will be quizzed weekly. Towards the end of the course, they will engage in a large-scale group design project, to be presented by the last class of the semester.


I encourage you to build on the ideas of others, and I require you to cite the work that influences your design. Please follow this link and read carefully: http://www.plagiarism.org/.





Assignment

Grade

Percent


Quizzes and homework

60%

Final Design

30%

Participation

10%

Total Grade

100%



Ethical Conduct


The following statement is printed in the Stevens Graduate Catalog and applies to all students taking Stevens courses, on and off campus.
“Cheating during in-class tests or take-home examinations or homework is, of course, illegal and immoral. A Graduate Academic Evaluation Board exists to investigate academic improprieties, conduct hearings, and determine any necessary actions. The term ‘academic impropriety’ is meant to include, but is not limited to, cheating on homework, during in-class or take home examinations and plagiarism.“

Consequences of academic impropriety are severe, ranging from receiving an “F” in a course, to a warning from the Dean of the Graduate School, which becomes a part of the permanent student record, to expulsion.



Reference: The Graduate Student Handbook, Academic Year 2003-2004 Stevens

Institute of Technology, page 10.

Consistent with the above statements, all homework exercises, tests and exams that are designated as individual assignments MUST contain the following signed statement before they can be accepted for grading. ____________________________________________________________________

I pledge on my honor that I have not given or received any unauthorized assistance on this assignment/examination. I further pledge that I have not copied any material from a book, article, the Internet or any other source except where I have expressly cited the source.

Signature _________________________ Date: _____________

Please note that assignments in this class may be submitted to www.turnitin.com, a web-based anti-plagiarism system, for an evaluation of their originality.




Course/Teacher Evaluation

Continuous improvement can only occur with feedback based on comprehensive and appropriate surveys. Your feedback is an important contributor to decisions to modify course content/pedagogy which is why we strive for 100% class participation in the survey. 


All course teacher evaluations are conducted on-line.  You will receive an e-mail one week prior to the end of the course informing you that the survey site (https://www.stevens.edu/assess) is open along with instructions for accessing the site.  Login using your Campus (email) username and password. This is the same username and password you use for access to Moodle. Simply click on the course that you wish to evaluate and enter the information. All responses are strictly anonymous.  We especially encourage you to clarify your position on any of the questions and give explicit feedbacks on your overall evaluations in the section at the end of the formal survey which allows for written comments.  We ask that you submit your survey prior to end of the examination period.  






#

Title


Description

Assignments due

Reading due

1

8/28

Introduction

Overview of the course
What will you learn?
Actors and scenarios
Design space








2

9/4


Architecture Process

What does an institution want out of an architecture?
Why is an architecture so hard to create?
What are the steps?

Personal Information System 1

Wikipedia:

Software architecture

Personal Information System, Personal Information Manager, Cache




3

9/11


Representing the architecture

Table of contents for an architecture document.
Diagramming conventions

Personal Information System 2

Wikipedia:

Unified Modeling Language


4

9/18


Architecture Patterns

Design Patterns
Asynchronous methods for integration


Group project 1

Wikipedia:

Design Pattern

Asynchronous I/O


Further reading:

Fowler, Wikipedia: process calculus



5

9/25


Design Scenarios

Several practice problems and the kinds of questions that should be asked in solving them

Group project 2




6

10/2


Layers and Components

Ways of subdividing a system.


The value of abstraction



Individual assignment 2 v1

Wikipedia:

Abstraction layer

Network devices


Internet Protocol Suite


Mainframe computer


7

10/09


Storage Hierarchy

Memory and Disk

Moore's law

How storage speeds drive design decisions


Individual assignment 2 v2

Wikipedia:

Storage hierarchy

Moore’s law

Disk Drives


8

10/16


Midterm






Wikipedia:

Data Parallelism

Task Parallelism

RAM memory

Multi-core

Scalability

RAID


Map Reduce

Client-Queue-Client




9

10/23


Parallelism

Data and task parallelism
How mainframes provide data parallelism
How Google and other search companies handle large amounts of data.

Individual assignments due for review.
Final project starts

Wikipedia:

Decision tree

Bayesian Inference

Tradeoff

IBM Parallel Sysplex


Two-phase locking



10

10/30


Evaluating Architecture

How do you know if an architecture is good or bad?
Transactions

Security


Recoverability




Wikipedia:

Service-oriented Architecture

Message passing




11

11/6


Changing the architecture

How do you change an architecture?
Transitions, green fields, and legacies.




Wikipedia:

Cognition

Social Networks


12

11/13


Emerging infrastructure technologies

Clouds, virtualization, solid state disks, AI, autonomic computing




Wikipedia:

SaaS (Software as a Service)

Cloud Computing

Solid State Drives

Autonomic computing

Artificial Intelligence


13

11/20


Review










14

12/4


Summary, final presentations

Students present their projects to the class

Final project due











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