Northumbria university undergraduate programme specification



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NORTHUMBRIA UNIVERSITY

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION


1.

Programme or Pathway Title, and Award

Applied Computing BSc (Hons)




2.
UCAS or Other Admissions Code

C510 BSc/AC




3.
Northumbria Programme Code

CGA04BC, CGA04BD, IZA04AC (Jan) (FT)




4.

Mode of Delivery

On Site

YES




Distance Learning






Distance Delivery







5.

Mode of Attendance

Full Time

YES




Sandwich







Part Time







6.

Location of Delivery

Northumbria

City




Other UK please specify










Overseas please specify







7.

Collaborative Provision if applicable

Franchised







Validated







Joint







Dual













Partner Institution






8.

Date(s) of Approval/ Review

Reviewed Feb 2011, July 2014




9.

QAA Subject Benchmark Group

Computing




10.

PSRB accreditation if applicable

n/a
















11.

Educational Aims of the Programme Specified in terms of the general intentions of the programme and its distinctive characteristics; these should be consistent with any relevant benchmark and with the Mission of the University.




This programme will provide one year of full-time level 6 study in computing, for students to gain a 'completion' BSc(Hons) award. Students will enter this programme with approved advanced standing from Foundation Degree or Higher National awards (or equivalent) in the UK or overseas.
All students on this programme will be required to take a 20 credit Case Project, which includes elements of both individual and group work. In support of the project, all students will take 3 core modules, 20 credits of Project Management and Professional Issues, 20 credits of Object Oriented Modelling and Design and 20 credits of Object Oriented and Web Programming. Additionally, they will take 20 credits of Social Issues in Computing, which will prepare students for adopting an academic approach to their study and explore Professional, Ethical, Legal and Social issues. The remaining 20 credits will be an option, chosen from existing modules elsewhere in the School, to match each student's aspirations and prior skills, knowledge and experience.
Regardless of the option chosen, the programme will aim to extend – both broaden and deepen – students’ existing computing knowledge and skills with an emphasis on applying this knowledge and these skills to practical applied computing problem domains. Additionally, it will develop students' critical abilities and general problem solving skills and lay a foundation for continuing education and self-improvement.

Students graduating from this programme should be able to:



  • Plan, manage and undertake a substantial piece of group project work.

  • Work professionally as a computing practitioner.

  • Successfully exploit a range of methods and tools in developing workable solutions to complex information system problems.

  • Explore social and current issues in the computing field.

  • Critically appraise the suitability of current and emerging computing technologies to support a variety of domains.

  • Develop transferable/key skills:

      • Communicate effectively (in writing and orally) at the appropriate business and technical level with users, management, customers and technical specialists.

      • Work individually and in teams, exercising initiative and personal responsibility, managing their time and learning experience.










12.

How Students are Supported in their Learning/Employability/Career Development eg curriculum design, personal development plans, placements, fieldwork, practical projects.




Students are supported by



  • The Programme Leader who will always be able to deal with questions relating to the programme and study in general.




  • Programme Induction: Students will be supplied with details of programme structure, assessment, University support (Student Services), the Student Support Team in the School Office, the University Library and the University’s e-learning portal Blackboard. Students will be given advice re study and time management, familiarisation with laboratory hardware and software. Details of option choices and careers guidance will also be provided.




  • The students’ Programme Handbook detailing programme structure, assessment schedule, regulations, advice re study skills and time management, available support, module descriptors.




  • The University’s e-learning portal Blackboard detailing staff, programme and module information and learning materials.



  • Direct access to all staff by e-mail, and feedback provided by staff on assessment work undertaken.




  • Direct academic support in seminars/computer lab. sessions.




  • Student Representatives who represent their views and concerns at Staff-Student Liaison Committee and Programme Committee meetings.




  • The dedicated Student Support Team based in the School Office.




  • Qualitative and quantitative feedback will be provided for all summative assessments. Formative feedback is widely used throughout the programme to help the students improve and enhance various aspects of their learning.

The design of this degree expressly supports the employability of its graduates: the choice of skill and knowledge areas, tools, techniques and methods has been made to ensure graduates are immediately useful to employers, in the UK and overseas, no matter which option they select. Industry practice and subject benchmarking have strongly influenced the design, and the programme content will evolve in line with developments in the industry, in the subject as an academic discipline, and in the market place.


Opportunities for applying and demonstrating abilities in key transferable skills exist throughout the year. The ability to work effectively as an individual, both as a student and as a practitioner, is a critical skill demonstrated through formative and summative work over the year. Learning independently, managing oneself and others on project tasks, evaluating and reflecting upon practitioner experience are all essential skills of the computing professional which the modules help to develop.


13.
Learning Outcomes of Programme Specified in terms of performance capabilities to be shown on completion of the programme/pathway. Please identify numerically to correspond to the map of learning outcomes in section 18.



  1. Knowledge and Understanding



A1: Techniques, tools and issues involved in developing workable software solutions to complex information system problems.

A2: Current and emerging computing technologies used to support business information systems development and operation.

A3: The professional, ethical and legal and social issues involved in the development and operation of computer-based information systems.






  1. Intellectual Skills



B1: Select, plan and manage individual and team-based development projects.

B2: Discuss and critically evaluate available development tools, methods, and technologies

B3: Identify a problem and select and apply effective methods and tools for its solution

B4: Integrate and evaluate information and data from a variety of sources including literature searches

B5: Demonstrate and exercise independence of mind and thought

B6: Reflect on the professional and ethical issues surrounding computer-based information system development and use





  1. Practical Skills



C1: Use a range of tools, techniques, knowledge and technologies in the solution of complex computing and business information system problems.

C2: Design and build high quality components of computer-based systems.

C3: Use appropriate techniques and tools to support effective management of the development and operation of software systems.







  1. Transferable/Key Skills



D1: communicate information, ideas, problems and their solution, in both written and oral form.

D2: manage their time and resources efficiently.

D3: work effectively both individually and as a member of a team.

D4: exercise initiative and personal responsibility.

D5: learn independently using a diverse range of resources.

D6: evaluate and criticise their own learning experience.





14.

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy Specified to enable learners to achieve and demonstrate the above learning outcomes.



Although much of the initial LEARNING and TEACHING on taught modules take place via lectures supported by small-group seminars or computer laboratory sessions, students are quickly expected to become independent learners: (self-)critical, reflective, and creative as professional computing practitioners.


Seminars are key vehicles for developing these skills and providing opportunities for their use. Seminars are also used to discuss, reinforce and extend concepts, issues, techniques, tools and technologies learned in earlier studies and work experience and during this programme.
Laboratory work is a vital element of some modules for the development of advanced practical skills. In these sessions students can learn, apply and receive formative feedback on the use of such skills.
Lecturers are free to adopt teaching styles to suit the material delivered, and their own personalities and abilities. However, IT, in particular the internet and the eLP, will be used extensively to support lectures, seminars, laboratory work and independent learning.
At this level seminars and laboratory sessions involve more open-ended and complex problem domains in line with the School’s Learning and Teaching Strategy. Students are expected to select and apply a range of different solutions to problems which they will need to recognise and define from the given domain. Case studies and individual and group activities will be used to develop these higher order skills with students increasingly working independently of staff.
Integration of the knowledge and skills developed on the programme is achieved through a Case Project. This project, in which aspects of both individual and team work are undertaken to produce a computing product (normally a software application) and a written evaluation, provides a key focus for application of students' intellectual skills, developed in earlier study and in parallel modules on this programme. Students work both independently, to create various elements of a software product, and as a team to integrate the individual components.
ASSESSMENT of a module includes a mix of summative and formative elements. A key goal of the School is to avoid overloading student summative assessment. To that end, each learning outcome on a module is only summatively assessed once whenever possible. The form of summative assessment is specified by the Module tutor as are its weightings, appropriate to the particular module, and may comprise coursework and/or examination. All modules are 20 credits and so must have a maximum of two assessment components. This assessment approach is detailed in the School’s Assessment Strategy.









15.

Programme Structure Diagrams can also be used to demonstrate the structure.







Programme Structure. Refer if necessary to appended diagrams
Progression for Honours Programme
















Level 6

On this one year programme, 100 credits of study is core, of which 20 credits is the Case Project. Students also choose one 20 credit option, in discussion with the Programme Leader
Please refer to the PROGRAMME STRUCTURE DIAGRAM, and the list of modules accompanying this Programme Specification for more detail.


Students must have achieved 120 credits at level 4 and 120 credits at level 5 before starting this programme, or equivalent
Honours Degree awarded for total of 360 credits, including the 240 credits achieved prior to starting this programme.
Pass Degree awarded for total of 300 credits.

16.

Interim Awards Credit Structure and Programme Learning Outcomes for Interim Awards. Please delete or add rows as appropriate, with reference to section 8 of the Assessment Regulations for Northumbria Awards and specify learning outcomes for each of the interim awards.




Award
Credit Structure

Programme Learning Outcomes May be completed with reference to section 13.




Pass Degree






Students must complete 60 credits of modules at level 6. For module-specific learning outcomes refer to Module Descriptors.




17.
Variation From Assessment Regulations. Provide details of any approved variations from the standard University regulations.




Compliant with Standard Assessment Regulations.





18.
Mapping of Learning Outcomes




This section shows how the individual modules (with module learning outcomes as written in the module descriptor) together contribute to programme learning outcomes. It should be presented as a matrix of programme learning outcomes (as identified numerically in section 13), against modules. Where a module contributes to a programme learning outcome it should be flagged. Standard practice will be for a single symbol to indicate a learning outcome is addressed in the module. See guidance notes for discussion of alternative practices.





Code

Core/ option

a Knowledge & Understanding

b) Intellectual Skills

c) Practical Skills

d) Transferable Key Skills







1

2

3

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

1

2

3

4

5

6

Level 6























































CM0656

C


x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

CM0647

C








x

x










x

x







x




x

x

x

x

x

CM0615

C


x

x




x

x

x




x




x

x




x

x

x

x

x



CM0667

C


x

x







x

x




x




x

x







x




x

x



CM0668

C








x




x




x

x

x













x

x

x

x

























































For optional modules see appendices below.




19.

Admission Requirements




The ability to benefit from the programme is the key admissions’ criterion. This is assessed by a combination of academic and personal qualities which can be demonstrated in a number of ways. Successful completion of academic courses is just one way. Students who can in other ways demonstrate their ability to benefit from a Northumbria University programme, in particular mature students without formal qualifications, will always be considered and are invited to contact the University’s admissions office or the Programme Leader to discuss their application.

Applicants should use the personal statement on their application to illustrate their abilities, aptitudes, skills, qualifications and experiences which might be taken into account as well as or instead of any of the formal qualifications listed below. It is University policy to recognise a wide variety of evidence, and potential applicants may wish to discuss this aspect of their application with the admission tutor.






Admission with Advanced Standing: Direct entry into level 6 with 120 credits (or equivalent) of appropriate level 5 study (UK or overseas) will be the normal entry on to this ‘completion’ programme. Each application will be considered on an individual basis.
Applicants from Shenyang Normal University whose first language is not English will be asked for evidence of an IELTS score of 6.0 (minimum component score 5.5) or equivalent.
Applicants with non-standard qualifications, or with advanced standing, are assessed individually by the Admissions Office or the International Office in consultation with the Programme Leader, and admitted if it is felt that they are likely to succeed on the programme.

Interviews

Interviews may be held where



  • the suitability of a candidate is in doubt and further evidence is sought

  • candidates present an unusual set of qualifications taken or pending, and an appropriate conditional offer needs to be determined

  • candidates may need advice on the appropriateness of a programme, or on the appropriateness of a proposed preparatory course of study

Applicants invited for an interview will always be told its purpose.








20.

Application Procedure Amend as appropriate




Applications may either processed by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS), for students studying in the UK, or directly to the University Admissions Office who assess applicants in conjunction with the programme leader. Applications from students from outside the EU will be processed by the University’s International office in conjunction with the programme leader.


Appendix 1

Programme Structure Diagram
September Start


S1

CM0647

Project Management and Professional Development

(20 credits)


CM0668

Social Issues in Computing

(20 credits)


CM0667

Object Oriented and Web Programming

(20 credits)


CM0615

Object Oriented Modelling and Design

(20 credits)


S2

CM0656

Case Project

(20 credits)


Option

(20 credits)


January Start




S2

CM0647

Project Management and Professional Development

(20 credits)


CM0668

Social Issues in Computing

(20 credits)


CM0668

Object Oriented and Web Programming

(20 credits)


CM0615

Object Oriented Modelling and Design

(20 credits)


S1

CM0656

Case Project

(20 credits)


Option

(20 credits)


Shaded modules are core to this programme.


Appendix 2 Option Modules
Option Modules that will be offered are:
For September start students in their 2nd semester (Jan-May)

CM0636 Networks 2 (20 credits)

CM0603 Strategic Systems Management (20 credits)

CM0573 Mobile Application Development (20 credits)

EN0632 Principles of Wireless Mobile Networks (20 credits)
For January start students in their 2nd semester (Sept-Dec)

CM0602 Effective Systems Development

CM0566 Interactive Story and Sound Design

New option modules may be introduced when available or new modules may replace option modules that are discontinued in future.


Appendix 3 - Sept 2011 Run out plan for Jan start Students
Run out Plan September 2011
For September 2011 a run out programme will be required for Jan start students completing on the currently existing structure. Students will be required to choose 30 or 40 credits of options. For this reason 2 modules will be retained for one semester of 10 credit size.
It is proposed that the following modules should be exceptionally run:
CG0119 Web Databases (10 credits)

CM0653 Object Oriented Programming in Java (10 credits)


In addition the following 20 credit options will be available from the new structure.

CM0602 Effective Systems Development (20 credits)

CM0566 Interactive Story and Sound Design (20 credits)

Appendix 1 Existing Programme structures



Structure 1 (Individual YL Project)




Sem 1




Project Management & Professional Development CM0647



Option or

(OOMD CM0615*)


Option

or

CM0561 Academic Communi-cation**


Sem 2

Project***



30 credits of options



*Core module for all students unless they have studied development method(s) to a significant level. Otherwise this is an option to be chosen from the current list of options

**Core for none native speakers of English, otherwise an option (slot)

***Either CM0645 Software Engineering Project or CM0646 Individual Project


Structure 2 (Group Project)

– involves the students choosing to undertake a case project (involving group work) in the form of a workshop (the structure below would apply).









Sem 1

Option

(CM0561 Academic Communi-cation**)


Project Management & Professional Development CM0647



Option or

OOMD CM0615*

Option

Sem 2

Case Project



40 credits of options


Students study 60 credit credits of modules each semester

*Core module for all students unless they have studied development method(s) to a significant level.

**Compulsory for non-native speakers of English.
Options
Semester 1 (starting in a September 2008 or 2009 …)

Object Oriented Programming in Java CM0653 (10 credits)

Web Database Systems CG0119 (10 credits)

Entrepreneurship & Small Bus. Start up in Informatics CM0617 (10 credits)

Applied Computer Networks 1 CM0635 (10 credits)

Applied Computer Networks 2 CM0636 (20 credits)

Application Integration Technologies CM0610 (20 credits)

Effective Systems Development CM0602 (20 credits)


Semester 2 (starting in January 2009 or 2010 …)

Social and Current Issues in Computing CG0052 (10 credits)

Object Oriented Programming in Java CM0653 (10 credits)

Entrepreneurship & Small Bus. Start up in Informatics CM0617 (10 credits)

Advanced Programming for computer Games CG0141 (10 credits)

Applied Computer Networks 1 CM0635 (10 credits)

Applied Computer Networks 2 CM0636 (20 credits)

Strategic Systems Management CM0603 (20 credits)


NOTE: Not all modules may be offered at any one time, however new modules may be added to this list.

Appendix 2 Proposed Structure




Sem 1


CM0647

Professionalism and Project Management

20 credits


CM0615

Object Oriented Modelling and Design



Cm0668
Social Issues in Computing

Cm0667
Object-Oriented and Web Programming

Sem 2

CM0656 Case Project

Option

The structure will be the same for both September and January starts, although options offered will be different.




LETTER OF RECOGNITION




LOG OF CHANGES

Any changes made to an approved Programme Specification (other than typographical corrections) should be logged below and the sheet appended to the Programme Specification. Subsequent changes can then be added. Where it is not practicable to change an existing Programme Specification, a new version is required.





Brief summary of change to Programme Specification

(including section number)



Programme code(s) affected by change

Programme title(s)

Date of approval / amendment

Admin change1

Y/N

Change takes effect

Stage/year of programme

eg Year 3

Semester/ academic year

eg S2;05/06

1.



Reduction of 10 credit modules – replacement with 20 credit modules




BSc (Hons) Applied Computing

16.2.11

No

Level

S1, 2011

2.
























3.
























4.

























HEAR SUPPLEMENT

The HEAR Supplement should be completed for all new and existing undergraduate honours degrees. Information in sections 7, 8 and 9 should apply to students gaining awards in the current academic year (with the possibility that this could differ from related information in the main programme specification). Once approved, it will be entered by Faculty support staff onto SITS and will be reviewed annually.



1.

Academic Year

2012/13




2.

Northumbria Programme Title and Route Code

BSc (Hons) Applied Computing - ACM1




3.

Mode/s of Attendance

Full Time

YES




Sandwich







Part Time













Other please specify







4.

Partner Institution/s

No




5.

Date of Approval










6.

Programme Entry Requirements (150 words maximum) This section should indicate any subject specific requirements, a statement regarding advanced entry to the programme and English language entry requirements (in line with the English language policy, IELTS component requirements should be specified in the Supplement and in section 19 of the programme specification). UCAS entry tariffs should not be specified.



As well as GCE and VCE ‘A levels’, the University accepts a wide range of entry qualifications including BTEC National Awards,

Scottish Highers and Advanced Highers, Irish Leaving Certificate, Access courses and the International Baccalaureate. Entry

requirements are usually expressed as UCAS tariff points and can be found in programme specifications and the on-line prospectus. In addition to achieving the UCAS tariff points for entry to the programme, students must also be able to demonstrate that they have studied an appropriate

minimum number of units at Level 3, which is usually not less than two full GCE or VCE A levels or equivalent (though for

programmes at sub degree level this requirement is usually not less than one full GCE or VCE A level or equivalent). Applicants

may be required to have studied a particular subject or subjects to a certain level. Where the first language is not English, an IELTS

score of 6.0 (with a minimum score of 5.5 in each component) will normally be required for entry.


Students may be admitted to the programme with advanced standing based on accredited prior learning or accredited prior experiential learning.


7.

Programme Statement (250 words maximum) This should be written primarily for an external audience (eg employers) clarifying the aims of the programme, pathways, professional body implications (including where an alternative award title indicates that professional requirements have not been met) and opportunities for work experience/placements or study abroad. Please note that further information on professional status is required in section 10 below.




The Applied Computing course has been specially designed for those who have studied a Foundation Degree or Higher National Diploma (or equivalent) in the UK or overseas and who wished to 'top-up' to a BSc (Hons) degree, where they have studied a wide range of topics, from systems development and strategic systems management, to social and current issues in computing, and professional management and practice. They have also completed a case project, which provided them with the opportunity to apply all of their existing skills to a substantial software development problem.

They were taught using a range of methods, including lectures and seminars, but also practical workshops, where they developed their skills in specialist computing laboratories.

Graduates are able to:


  • Plan, manage and undertake a substantial piece of group project work.

  • Work professionally as a computing practitioner.

  • Successfully exploit a range of methods and tools in developing workable solutions to complex information system problems.

  • Explore social and current issues in the computing field.

  • Critically appraise the suitability of current and emerging computing technologies to support a variety of domains.

  • Develop transferable/key skills:

      • Communicate effectively (in writing and orally) at the appropriate business and technical level with users, management, customers and technical specialists.

      • Work individually and in teams, exercising initiative and personal responsibility, managing their time and learning experience.



8.

Learning Outcomes applicable to students gaining awards in the current academic year. If these are the same as the main programme specification, please indicate ‘see section 13 of the main specification’ below.



The learning outcomes for an Honours degree are as follows:


Knowledge and Understanding:

1: Techniques, tools and issues involved in developing workable software solutions to complex information system problems.

2: Current and emerging computing technologies used to support business information systems development and operation.

3: The professional, ethical and legal and social issues involved in the development and operation of computer-based information systems.


Intellectual Skills:

1: Select, plan and manage individual and team-based development projects.

2: Discuss and critically evaluate available development tools, methods, and technologies

3: Identify a problem and select and apply effective methods and tools for its solution

4: Integrate and evaluate information and data from a variety of sources including literature searches

5: Demonstrate and exercise independence of mind and thought

6: Reflect on the professional and ethical issues surrounding computer-based information system development and use
Practical Skills:

1: Use a range of tools, techniques, knowledge and technologies in the solution of complex computing and business information system problems.

2: Design and build high quality components of computer-based systems.

3: Use appropriate techniques and tools to support effective management of the development and operation of software systems.


Transferable Skills:

1: communicate information, ideas, problems and their solution, in both written and oral form.

2: manage their time and resources efficiently.

3: work effectively both individually and as a member of a team.

4: exercise initiative and personal responsibility.

5: learn independently using a diverse range of resources.

6: evaluate and criticise their own learning experience.

An unclassified degree or lower level qualification may also be awarded where students have not met all learning outcomes.




9.

Professional status (100 words maximum) Please provide a statement on the professional status of the programme for students graduating in the current academic year, noting the following extract from guidance from the Higher Education Better Regulation Group (HEBRG)1 for the collection of data for the KIS:

The outcome of a successful programme accreditation by a PSRB may include one or more of the following:

    1. graduates are able to practise as a professional in a specific field, and in some cases receive a license to practise that is required by law;

    2. graduates are granted chartered status;

    3. graduates are granted exemption from all or part of professional exams;

    4. graduates are eligible for entry to membership of a professional association or learned society;

    5. the programme is confirmed as meeting externally designated standards and quality.

If not applicable, this section should be left blank and a default statement will appear on the HEAR.




11 Administrative changes are defined in section of Approval Processes for Taught Programmes and Modules

http://northumbria.ac.uk/sd/central/ar/lts/approval/



1 http://www.hesa.ac.uk/component/option,com_studrec/task,show_file/Itemid,233/mnl,12061/href,accreditation_guidance.html/


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